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Community as Partner Theory and Practice

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780781744546

ISBN10:
0781744547
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/8/2003
Publisher(s):
Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

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This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 10/8/2003.
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Summary

The thoroughly updated Fourth Edition of this AJN award-winning text examines the contemporary public health nurse's role as a hands-on caregiver, community detective, and epidemiologist. Emphasizing primary care, community assessment, and program planning, the book provides a practical how-to model for working with a community and includes case studies from communities throughout the world. This edition highlights a broader perspective on community ethics and development, an increased focus on epidemiology, and critical thinking questions.

Table of Contents

PART I Theoretical Foundations
CHAPTER 1 Primary Health Care
3(25)
Janet Gottschalk and Susan Scoville Baker
Introduction
3(1)
Globalization
4(8)
Primary Health Care
12(12)
Nurses for the 21st Century
24(4)
CHAPTER 2 Epidemiology, Demography, and Community Health
28(28)
Sandra A. Cashaw
Introduction
28(2)
Demography
30(1)
Levels of Prevention in Community Health Practice
30(1)
Descriptive Measures of Health
31(6)
Analytic Measures of Health
37(5)
Criteria for Determining Causation
42(1)
Sources of Community Health Data
43(3)
Screening for Health Conditions
46(3)
Epidemiologic Approaches to Community Health Research
49(7)
CHAPTER 3 Environment and the Health of Communities
56(27)
Ruth Grubesic
Introduction
56(1)
Pollution
57(14)
The Complex Human Environment
71(2)
Application: A Regional Case Study
73(4)
Model Application
77(2)
Policy Implication
79(4)
CHAPTER 4 Ethical Quandaries in Community Health Nursing
83(14)
Susan Scoville Baker
Introduction
83(1)
What Is Ethics?
84(2)
Seven Principles Essential in Health Care Ethics
86(5)
Ethical Quandaries in Community Health
91(6)
CHAPTER 5 Community Empowerment and Healing
97(17)
Bruce Leonard
Introduction
97(1)
Perspectives on Community Health Partnerships
98(2)
Community Participation and Healing
100(2)
Healing in the Community
102(1)
Developing Right-Relationships
103(2)
Transforming Communities Through Empowerment
105(2)
Empowering a Community Through Participatory Action Research
107(7)
CHAPTER 6 Cultural Competence in Partnerships With Communities
114(22)
Judith C. Drew
Introduction
115(1)
Diversity, Ethnicity, and Culture
116(2)
Culture, Health and Illness, and Nursing
118(1)
Cultural Health Care Systems
119(3)
Decision Making
122(1)
Conflict Among Sectors
123(2)
The Culturally Competent Provider
125(1)
Cultural Awareness Exercises
126(1)
Eliciting Health and Illness Beliefs
127(2)
Adapting Skills
129(1)
The Agency
130(6)
CHAPTER 7 Health Policy for Healthy Communities and Cities
136(17)
Beverly C. Flynn
Introduction
136(1)
World Conferences on Health Promotion and Healthy Public Policy
137(1)
Health Promotion
138(1)
Healthy Public Policy
139(5)
Health Policy Actions of Healthy Cities and Communities
144(2)
Opportunities for Community Health Nursing
146(7)
PART II The Process
CHAPTER 8 A Model to Guide Practice
153(16)
Elizabeth T. Anderson
Introduction
153(1)
Models
154(10)
Assessment
164(1)
Diagnosis and Planning
165(1)
Intervention
165(1)
Evaluation
166(3)
CHAPTER 9 Community Assessment
169(53)
Elizabeth T. Anderson and Judith McFarlane
Introduction
169(2)
Community Assessment
171(3)
Community Core
174(6)
Physical Environment
180(5)
Health and Social Services
185(11)
Economics
196(4)
Safety and Transportation
200(8)
Politics and Government
208(1)
Communication
209(1)
Education
210(7)
Recreation
217(5)
CHAPTER 10 Community Analysis and Nursing Diagnosis
222(29)
Elizabeth T. Anderson and Judith McFarlane
Introduction
222(1)
Community Analysis
222(3)
Rosemont Sample Community Analysis
225(26)
CHAPTER 11 Planning a Community Health Program
251(23)
Elizabeth T. Anderson and Judith McFarlane
Introduction
251(3)
Validating Community Nursing Diagnoses
254(1)
Planned Change
254(2)
Applying Change Theory to Community Health Planning
256(8)
Community Health Goal
264(2)
Program Activities
266(1)
Learning Objectives
267(1)
Collaboration
268(1)
Resources, Constraints, and Revised Plans
268(3)
Recording
271(3)
CHAPTER 12 Implementing a Community Health Program
274(16)
Elizabeth T. Anderson and Judith McFarlane
Introduction
275(1)
Community Ownership
275(2)
Unified Program
277(2)
Healthy People
279(3)
Health Focus
282(8)
CHAPTER 13 Evaluating a Community Health Program
290(27)
Elizabeth T. Anderson and Judith McFarlane
Introduction
291(1)
Evaluation Principles
291(1)
The Evaluation Process
292(2)
Components of Evaluation
294(2)
Evaluation Strategies
296(1)
Selected Methods of Data Collection
296(21)
PART III Strategies for Health Promotion
CHAPTER 14 Diversity in Practice
317(10)
Shirley Hutchinson
Introduction
317(1)
Reflections on the Past
318(1)
Community Health in the United States: The Emerging Scene
319(2)
Outcomes Management in Community Health
321(1)
The Essence of Community Health Nursing Practice
321(1)
Factors Influencing Community Health Nursing in the 21st Century
322(5)
CHAPTER 15 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Refugees and Immigrants
327(10)
Charles Kemp
Introduction
327(2)
Strategies for Health Promotion: "Community Care
329(1)
Individual- and Family-Oriented Services
330(3)
Community-Oriented Services
333(4)
CHAPTER 16 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Schools
337(18)
Nina Fredland
Introduction
337(1)
Delivering Health Services for Health Promotion
338(2)
Health Education for Health Promotion
340(1)
Health Promotion Programs for School-Age Children
340(9)
Health Promotion Strategies for the School
349(1)
Health Promotion Strategies for the Community
350(5)
CHAPTER 17 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Faith Communities
355(14)
Nina Fredland
Introduction
355(1)
Initiating Healthy Partnerships With Faith Communities
356(2)
Health Promotion Programs for Faith Communities
358(4)
Establishing a Lasting Partnership With Faith Communities
362(7)
CHAPTER 18 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Homeless Populations
369(12)
Nina Fredland
Introduction
369(1)
Who Are the Homeless?
370(1)
Health Promotion Strategies for Homeless People
371(3)
Promoting Healthy Partnerships Through Education
374(1)
Positive Parenting Sessions
374(1)
Organizing a Health Fair in a Homeless Shelter
375(1)
Overcoming Barriers Related to the Education of Homeless Youth
375(1)
Promoting the Sexual Health of Homeless Adolescents
376(1)
Promoting Healthy Partnerships With People Exiting Homelessness
377(4)
CHAPTER 19 Promoting Healthy Partnerships in the Workplace
381(13)
Pam Willson and Ann Malecha
Introduction
381(1)
Workplace Health Promotion
382(1)
Types of Health Promotion Activities
382(1)
Planning a Health Promotion Program
383(2)
Resources for Health Promotion Programs
385(1)
Using Stages of Change in Health Promotion Programs
386(1)
Program Implementation
386(1)
Program Evaluation
387(1)
Tips for Maintaining a Health Promotion Program
388(1)
Examples of Health Promotion Programs
388(6)
CHAPTER 20 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Community Elders
394(15)
Shirley Hutchinson
Introduction
394(1)
Demographics of Aging in the United States
395(1)
Health Challenges, Risk Factors, and Concerns of Elders
395(5)
Healthy People 2010 and Older Adults
400(2)
Partnerships With Community Elders
402(3)
Significant Legislation and Older Americans
405(4)
CHAPTER 21 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With Rural Populations
409(10)
Mary Wainwright
Introduction
409(1)
Rural Nursing Theory
410(3)
Building a Partnership
413(6)
CHAPTER 22 Promoting Healthy Partnerships With the Chronically Ill
419(9)
Pamela Schultz
Introduction
419(1)
Characteristics of Chronic Health Conditions
420(2)
Health Perception and Chronic Illness and Health Promotion
422(1)
Implementation of Health Promotion Strategies
423(2)
Research Culture in Community Nursing
425(3)
Appendix A A Model Assessment Guide for Nursing in Industry 428(6)
Appendix B Assessment of an Industry 434(7)
Postscript 441(4)
Index 445


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