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Compact Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing,

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Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9781413022827

ISBN10:
1413022820
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/13/2006
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $103.00

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Summary

This compact edition retains all the features that have made the full edition so successful in a smaller, affordable volume: The first compact three-genre introduction to literature text to address the changing canon is now the first to include a guide for writing about literature-with handbook coverage of critical thinking, argument, and the writing process. Combining the broadest selection of literature available with time-proven and class-tested instruction, the sixth edition remains the most responsive introduction to literature text available.

Table of Contents

Authors Represented by Multiple Works xxxvii
Preface xliii
PART 1 A GUIDE TO WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE 1(134)
1 UNDERSTANDING LITERATURE
3(14)
Imaginative Literature
3(2)
Conventional Themes
5(1)
The Literary Canon
6 (3)
Luisa Valenzuela, All about Suicide
7 (1)
Wole Soyinka, Telephone Conversation
8 (1)
Interpreting Literature
9(2)
Evaluating Literature
11(3)
The Function of Literary Criticism
14 (3)
Checklist: Evaluating Literary Criticism
15(2)
2 READING AND WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
17(26)
Reading Literature
17(4)
Previewing
17(1)
Highlighting
18(1)
Checklist: Using Highlighting Symbols
19(1)
Maya Angelou, My Arkansas
19 (2)
Annotating
20(1)
Writing about Literature
21 (22)
Planning an Essay
22(6)
Drafting an Essay
28(1)
Revising and Editing an Essay
29 (14)
Checklist: Using Sources
34(1)
Checklist: Conventions of Writing about Literature
35(1)
Exercise: Two Student Papers
36(1)
Student Paper: Initiation into Adulthood
37 (3)
Student Paper: Hard Choices
40(3)
3 WRITING SPECIAL KINDS OF PAPERS
43(35)
Writing a Comparison-Contrast
43(8)
Checklist: Writing a Comparison-Contrast
44 (1)
Comparing Two Fictional Characters
45(5)
Student Paper: The Dangerous Consequences of Societal Limbo
45(5)
Suggested Topics for Comparison-Contrast Papers
50 (1)
Writing an Explication
51(7)
Checklist: Writing an Explication
51(1)
Explicating a Poem
51(6)
Student Paper: A Lingering Doubt
52(5)
Suggested Topics for Explication Papers
57 (1)
Writing a Character Analysis
58(5)
Checklist: Writing a Character Analysis
58 (1)
Analyzing a Character in a Play
59(4)
Student Paper: Linda Loman: Breaking the Mold
59(4)
Suggested Topics for Character Analysis Papers
63 (1)
Writing about a Work's Historical Context
63 (8)
Checklist: Writing about a Work's Historical Context
64(1)
Setting a Literary Work in Its Historical Context
64(6)
Student Paper: Dreaming of Home
65(5)
Suggested Topics for Historical Context Papers
70(1)
4 THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT YOUR WRITING
71(3)
Distinguishing Fact from Opinion
71 (2)
Evaluating Supporting Evidence
73 (1)
Detecting Bias in Your Writing
73 (1)
Understanding Logic
74(4)
Inductive Reasoning
74(1)
Deductive Reasoning
75 (1)
Toulmin Logic
76(1)
Recognizing Logical Fallacies
76(2)
5 WRITING LITERARY ARGUMENTS
78(16)
Planning a Literary Argument
78(3)
Choosing a Debatable Topic
78(1)
Developing an Argumentative Thesis
79(1)
Checklist: Developing an Argumentative Thesis
79 (1)
Defining Your Terms
80(1)
Considering Your Audience
80(1)
Refuting Opposing Arguments
81(1)
Using Evidence Effectively
81(3)
Supporting Your Literary Argument
81(1)
Establishing Credibility
82 (1)
Being Fair
83(1)
Using Visuals as Evidence
84(1)
Organizing a Literary Argument
84(10)
Writing a Literary Argument
85(10)
Student Paper: The Politics of "Everyday Use"
86(8)
6 WRITING A RESEARCH PAPER
94 (15)
Choosing a Topic
94(1)
Doing Exploratory Research
94(1)
Narrowing Your Topic
95(1)
Doing Focused Research
95(3)
Library Research
95 (1)
Internet Research
96(2)
Taking Notes
98(1)
Integrating Sources
99(1)
Drafting a Thesis Statement
100(1)
Making an Outline
100(1)
Drafting Your Paper
101(1)
Sample Research Paper with MLA Documentation
102(7)
Student Paper: And Again She Makes the Journey: Character and Act in Eudora Welty's "A Worn Path"
102(7)
7 DOCUMENTING SOURCES AND AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
109(17)
Avoiding Plagiarism
109(3)
Document All Material That Requires Documentation
110(1)
Enclose Borrowed Words in Quotation Marks
110(1)
Do Not Imitate a Source's Syntax and Phrasing
111(1)
Differentiate Your Words from Those of Your Source
111(1)
Checklist: Plagiarism and Internet Sources
112(1)
Documenting Sources
112(14)
Parenthetical References in the Text
112 (4)
Checklist: Guidelines for Punctuating Parenthetical References
113(3)
The Works-Cited List
116(9)
Content Notes
125(1)
8 WRITING ESSAY EXAMS ABOUT LITERATURE
126 (9)
Planning an Essay Exam Answer
126(3)
Review Your Material
126(1)
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
127 (1)
Read through the Entire Exam
127 (1)
Read Each Question Carefully
127 (2)
Brainstorm to Find Ideas
129(1)
Shaping an Essay Exam Answer
129(1)
State Your Thesis
129(1)
Make a Scratch Outline
130(1)
Drafting and Revising an Essay Exam Answer
130(7)
Sample Student Essay Exam Answer
131(4)
PART 2 FICTION 135(520)
9 UNDERSTANDING FICTION
137(12)
Origins of Modern Fiction
137(5)
The History of the Novel
138(4)
The History of the Short Story
142(1)
Defining the Short Story
142 (1)
Ernest Hemingway, Hills Like White Elephants
143(4)
Recognizing Kinds of Fiction
147(2)
10 FICTION SAMPLER: THE SHORT-SHORT
149(1)
Gary Gildner, Sleepy Time Gal
150(2)
Jonathan Safran Foer, A Primer for the Punctuation of Heart Disease
152(5)
Margaret Atwood, Happy Endings
157 (3)
Jamaica Kincaid, Girl
160(1)
Amanda Holzer, Love and Other Catastrophes: A Mix Tape
161(1)
Monica Ware, Mislaid Plans
162(2)
11 READING AND WRITING ABOUT FICTION
164(1)
Reading Fiction
164(1)
Active Reading
165(1)
Alberto Alvaro Rios, The Secret Lion
165(6)
Writing about Fiction
171(18)
Planning an Essay
171(4)
Drafting an Essay
175(4)
Student Paper: Symbols in "The Secret Lion" (First Draft)
176(3)
Revising and Editing an Essay
179(26)
Student Paper: Symbols in "The Secret Lion" (Second Draft)
180(4)
Student Paper: "The Secret Lion": Everything Changes (Final Draft)
184(5)
12 PLOT
189(3)
Conflict
189(1)
Stages of Plot
190(1)
Order and Sequence
191(1)
Checklist: Writing about Plot
192(1)
Kate Chopin, The Story of an Hour
192 (3)
Naguib Mahfouz, Half a Day
195 (4)
Stephen Dobyns, Kansas
199(6)
William Faulkner, A Rose for Emily
205(11)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Plot
213(3)
13 CHARACTER
216(22)
Round and Flat Characters
216 (1)
Dynamic and Static Characters
217 (1)
Motivation
218(1)
Checklist: Writing about Character
218 (1)
John Updike, A&P
219(6)
Katherine Mansfield, Miss Brill
225 (5)
Gish Jen, The Water Faucet Vision
230 (8)
Charles Baxter, Gryphon
238(14)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Character
250(1)
14 SETTING
251(31)
Historical Setting
252(1)
Geographical Setting
252(1)
Physical Setting
253(2)
Checklist: Writing about Setting
254 (1)
Kate Chopin, The Storm
255(5)
Sherman J. Alexie, This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona
260(10)
Ralph Ellison, Battle Royal
270(12)
Tillie Olsen, I Stand Here Ironing
282(9)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Setting
290(1)
15 POINT OF VIEW
291(1)
First-Person Narrators
291(3)
Unreliable Narrators
292(2)
Third-Person Narrators
294(2)
Omniscient Narrators
294(1)
Limited Omniscient Narrators
295(1)
Objective Narrators
295(1)
Selecting an Appropriate Point of View
296(4)
Checklist: Selecting an Appropriate Point of View: Review
299(1)
Checklist: Writing about Point of View
300(1)
Richard Wright, Big Black Good Man
300(11)
Edgar Allan Poe, The Cask of Amontillado
311 (7)
William Faulkner, Barn Burning
318(14)
Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, The Disappearance
332(9)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Point of View
340(1)
16 STYLE, TONE, AND LANGUAGE
341(38)
Style and Tone
341(1)
The Uses of Language
341(2)
Formal and Informal Diction
343(2)
Imagery
345(1)
Figures of Speech
345(2)
Checklist: Writing about Style, Tone, and Language
346(1)
James Joyce, Araby
347(6)
Flannery O'Connor, A Good Man Is Hard to Find
353 (13)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper
366 (13)
Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
379(15)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Style, Tone, and Language
393(1)
17 SYMBOL, ALLEGORY, AND MYTH
394 (1)
Symbol
394(2)
Literary Symbols
395 (1)
Recognizing Symbols
395 (1)
Allegory
396(2)
Myth
398(2)
Checklist: Writing about Symbol, Allegory, and Myth
399 (1)
Jorge Luis Borges, The Book of Sand
400(4)
Shirley Jackson, The Lottery
404 (8)
Alice Walker, Everyday Use
412 (8)
Raymond Carver, Cathedral
420(12)
Nathaniel Hawthorne, Young Goodman Brown
432(13)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Symbol, Allegory, and Myth
443(1)
18 THEME
444 (37)
Interpreting Themes
445(1)
Identifying Themes
446(2)
Checklist: Writing about Theme
448(1)
Eudora Welty, A Worn Path
448(8)
David Michael Kaplan, Doe Season
456(12)
D.H. Lawrence, The Rocking-Horse Winner
468 (13)
Hisaye Yamamoto, Seventeen Syllables
481(15)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Theme
492(2)
19 FICTION IN FILM
494(50)
Fiction in Film: John Updike's "A&P"
496(2)
Fiction in Film: Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing"
498(2)
Fiction in Film: Alice Walker's "Everyday Use"
500(2)
Fiction in Film: Raymond Carver's "Cathedral"
502(2)
Fiction in Film: Eudora Welty's "A Worn Path"
504(2)
20 JOYCE CAROL OATES'S "WHERE ARE YOU GOING, WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?": A CASEBOOK FOR READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING
506(3)
Joyce Carol Oates, Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?
509(13)
Joyce Carol Oates, When Characters from the Page Are Made Flesh on the Screen
522(4)
Gretchen Schulz and R.J.R. Rockwood, from In Fairyland, without a Map: Connie's Exploration Inward in Joyce Carol Oates's "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?"
526(4)
Mike Tierce and John Michael Crafton, from Connie's Tambourine Man: A New Reading of Arnold Friend
530(3)
Bob Dylan, It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
533(1)
Laura Kalpakian, from a review of Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?: Selected Early Stories
534(3)
Don Moser, from The Pied Piper of Tucson
537(5)
Anonymous, The Pied Piper of Hamelin
542(2)
Charles Perrault, Little Red Riding Hood
544 (10)
Topics for Further Research
545(122)
Student Paper: Mesmerizing Men and Vulnerable Teens: Power Relationships in "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" and "Teenage Wasteland"
547(7)
21 FICTION FOR FURTHER READING
554 (128)
James Baldwin, Sonny's Blues
554(22)
Toni Cade Bambara, The Lesson
576(6)
T. Coraghessan Boyle, Greasy Lake
582(7)
Louise Erdrich, The Red Convertible
589(7)
Gabriel Garcia Márquez, A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings
596(5)
James Joyce, Eveline
601(4)
Franz Kafka, A Hunger Artist
605(6)
Flannery O'Connor, Everything That Rises Must Converge
611(11)
Edgar Allan Poe, The Tell-Tale Heart
622(3)
Katherine Anne Porter, The Jilting of Granny Weatherall
625(7)
John Steinbeck, The Chrysanthemums
632 (8)
Amy Tan, Two Kinds
640(8)
Anne Tyler, Teenage Wasteland
648(7)
PART 3 POETRY 655(1)
22 UNDERSTANDING POETRY
657 (366)
Marianne Moore, Poetry
657(1)
Nikki Giovanni, Poetry
658(1)
Origins of Modern Poetry
659(5)
Defining Poetry
664(1)
William Shakespeare, That time of year thou mayst in me behold
665(1)
Louis Zukofsky, I walk in the old street
665 (1)
E.E. Cummings, I(a
666(1)
Recognizing Kinds of Poetry
667(4)
Narrative Poetry
667 (1)
Lyric Poetry
667(2)
23 POETRY SAMPLER: VISUAL POETRY
669 (7)
George Herbert, Easter Wings
671(1)
May Swenson, Women
672(1)
Greg Williamson, Group Photo with Winter Trees
672(1)
Charles Bernstein, this poem intentionally left blank
673(1)
Ian Hamilton Finlay, Acrobats
673(1)
Reed Altemus and Jim Leftwich, Flake upper phase
674(1)
Bob Grumman, Mathemaku No. 10
675(1)
24 READING AND WRITING ABOUT POETRY
676(1)
Reading Poetry
676(1)
Active Reading
677(1)
Robert Hayden, Those Winter Sundays
677(1)
Seamus Heaney, Digging
678 (1)
Writing about Poetry
679(18)
Planning an Essay
679 (3)
Drafting an Essay
682(5)
Student Paper: A Comparison of Two Poems about Fathers (First Draft)
683(4)
Revising and Editing an Essay
687(15)
Student Paper: A Comparison of Two Poems about Fathers (Second Draft)
688(4)
Student Paper: Digging for Memories (Final Draft)
692(5)
25 VOICE
697 (27)
Emily Dickinson, I'm nobody! Who are you?
697 (1)
The Speaker in the Poem
697(1)
Louise Glück, Gretel in Darkness
698(2)
Leonard Adamé, My Grandmother Would Rock Quietly and Hum
700(1)
Langston Hughes, Negro
701(1)
Robert Browning, My Last Duchess
702(3)
FURTHER READING: The Speaker in the Poem
705 (1)
Leslie Marmon Silko, Where Mountain Lion Lay Down with Deer
705(3)
Janice Mirikitani, Suicide Note 706 Pat Mora, Veiled
708(1)
The Tone of the Poem
709(1)
Robert Frost, Fire and Ice
709(1)
Thomas Hardy, The Man He Killed
710(1)
Amy Lowell, Patterns
711(3)
FURTHER READING: The Tone of the Poem
714(1)
Adam Zagajewski, Try to Praise the Mutilated World
714(1)
William Wordsworth, The World Is Too Much with Us
715(1)
Claude McKay, The White City
716(1)
Robert Herrick, To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
717(1)
Deborah Garrison, Please Fire Me
718 (1)
Irony
719(1)
Robert Browning, Porphyria's Lover
719 (2)
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias
721 (1)
Ariel Dorfman, Hope
722(2)
FURTHER READING: Irony
724(1)
W.H. Auden, The Unknown Citizen
724(1)
Dudley Randall, Ballad of Birmingham
725 (4)
Checklist: Writing about Voice
726(1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Voice
727(2)
26 WORD CHOICE, WORD ORDER
729 (3)
Sipho Sepamla, Words, Words, Words
729(1)
Word Choice
730(1)
Walt Whitman, When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
731(1)
William Stafford, For the Grave of Daniel Boone
732 (2)
FURTHER READING: Word Choice
734(1)
James Wright, Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio
734(1)
Adrienne Rich, Living in Sin
735(2)
E.E. Cummings, in Just
737(1)
Robert Pinsky, ABC
738(1)
Levels of Diction
739(1)
Margaret Atwood, The City Planners
739(2)
Jim Sagel, Baca Grande
741(2)
FURTHER READING: Levels of Diction
743 (1)
Wanda Coleman, Sears Life
743(1)
Mark Halliday, The Value of Education
744 (1)
Charles Bukowski, Dog Fight
745(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks, We Real Cool
746 (1)
Word Order
747(1)
Edmund Spenser, One day I wrote her name upon the strand
748(1)
E.E. Cummings, anyone lived in a pretty how town
749(1)
FURTHER READING: Word Order
750(1)
A.E. Housman, To an Athlete Dying Young
750(1)
Checklist: Writing about Word Choice and Word Order
751(2)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Word Choice, Word Order
752(1)
27 IMAGERY
753 (5)
Jane Flanders, Cloud Painter
753(2)
William Carlos Williams, Red Wheelbarrow
755 (1)
Ezra Pound, In a Station of the Metro
756(1)
Gary Snyder, Some Good Things to Be Said for the Iron Age
756(1)
Suzanne E. Berger, The Meal
757(1)
William Carlos Williams, The Great Figure
758(2)
FURTHER READING: Imagery
760(1)
Michael Chitwood, Division
760(1)
Robert Frost, Nothing Gold Can Stay
760 (1)
Kobayashi Issa, Haiku
761(1)
William Shakespeare, My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
762(1)
Octavio Paz, Daybreak
763(1)
Octavio Paz, Nightfall
763(3)
Checklist: Writing about Imagery
764(1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Imagery
765(1)
28 FIGURES OF SPEECH
766(3)
William Shakespeare, Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
766(1)
Simile, Metaphor, and Personification
767 (1)
Langston Hughes, Harlem
767(1)
Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Constantly Risking Absurdity
768(1)
Audre Lorde, Rooming houses are old women
769(2)
FURTHER READING: Simile, Metaphor, and Personification
771(1)
Robert Burns, Oh, my love is like a red, red rose
771 (1)
N. Scott Momaday, Simile
771(1)
Sylvia Plath, Metaphors
772(1)
John Updike, Ex-Basketball Player
773(1)
Randall Jarrell, The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner
774 (1)
Marge Piercy, The Secretary Chant
775(1)
John Donne, A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
776 (2)
Hyperbole and Understatement
778(1)
Sylvia Plath, Daddy
778(3)
David Huddle, Holes Commence Falling
781(1)
FURTHER READING: Hyperbole and Understatement
782 (1)
Anne Bradstreet, To My Dear and Loving Husband
782 (1)
Andrew Marvell, To His Coy Mistress
783(2)
Robert Frost, "Out, Out—"
785(1)
Donald Hall, My Son, My Executioner
786(1)
Margaret Atwood, you fit into me
787(1)
Metonymy and Synecdoche
787(1)
Richard Lovelace, To Lucasta Going to the Wars
788 (1)
FURTHER READING: Metonymy and Synecdoche
788 (1)
Thomas Lux, Henry Clay's Mouth
788(1)
Apostrophe
789(1)
Sonia Sanchez, On Passing thru Morgantown, Pa.
790(1)
FURTHER READING: Apostrophe
791(1)
Allen Ginsberg, A Supermarket in California
791 (3)
Checklist: Writing about Figures of Speech
792 (1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Figures of Speech
793(1)
29 SOUND
794(5)
Walt Whitman, Had I the Choice
794 (1)
Rhythm
794(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks, Sadie and Maud
795 (1)
Meter
796(3)
Emily Dickinson, I like to see it lap the Miles
799(3)
FURTHER READING: Rhythm and Meter
802(1)
Adrienne Rich, Aunt Jennifer's Tigers
802 (1)
Etheridge Knight, For Malcolm, a Year After
803 (1)
Frank O'Hara, To the Poem
804(1)
Alliteration and Assonance
805(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Eagle
806 (1)
N. Scott Momaday, Comparatives
806 (1)
Robert Herrick, Delight in Disorder
807 (1)
Rhyme
808(1)
Ogden Nash, The Lama
809(1)
Richard Wilbur, A Sketch
809(2)
FURTHER READING: Alliteration, Assonance, and Rhyme
811(1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins, Pied Beauty
811(1)
W.H. Auden, As I Walked Out One Evening
812 (2)
Galway Kinnell, Blackberry Eating
814(1)
Robert Francis, Pitcher
815(1)
Lewis Carroll, Jabberwocky
816(3)
Checklist: Writing about Sound
817(1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Sound
818(1)
30 FORM
819(2)
John Keats, On the Sonnet
819 (1)
Billy Collins, Sonnet
819(2)
Closed Form
821(3)
Blank Verse
821(1)
Stanza
822(1)
The Sonnet
823(1)
William Shakespeare, When, in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes
824(1)
FURTHER READING: The Sonnet
824(1)
John Keats, On First Looking into Chapman's Homer
824(2)
Gwendolyn Brooks, First Fight. Then Fiddle
826(1)
The Sestina
826(1)
Alberto Alvaro Rios, Nani
827(1)
FURTHER READING: The Sestina
828(1)
Elizabeth Bishop, Sestina
828 (1)
The Villanelle
829(1)
Theodore Roethke, The Waking
829 (2)
The Epigram
830(1)
FURTHER READING: The Epigram
831(1)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, What Is an Epigram?
831 (1)
William Blake, Her Whole Life Is an Epigram
831 (1)
Martin Espada, Why I Went to College
831(1)
Haiku
832(1)
FURTHER READING: Haiku
832(1)
Matsuo Basho, Four Haiku
832(1)
Carolyn Kizer, After Basho
833(1)
José Juan Tablada, Haiku
833(1)
Jack Kerouac, American Haiku
834 (1)
Open Form
835(1)
Carl Sandburg, Chicago
836(1)
E.E. Cummings, the sky was candy
837(1)
FURTHER READING: Open Form
838(1)
Walt Whitman, from "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking"
838(1)
Diane Wakoski, Sleep
839(1)
Robert Hayden, Monet's "Waterlilies"
840 (2)
William Carlos Williams, Spring and All
842(1)
Carolyn Forché The Colonel
843 (4)
Checklist: Writing about Form
844 (1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Form
845(2)
31 SYMBOL, ALLEGORY, ALLUSION, MYTH
847(4)
William Blake, The Sick Rose
847(1)
Symbol
847(1)
Robert Frost, For Once, Then, Something
848(1)
Jim Simmerman, Child's Grave, Hale County, Alabama
849(2)
Emily Dickinson, Volcanoes be in Sicily
851(1)
FURTHER READING: Symbol
851(1)
Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven
851 (4)
Allegory
855(1)
Christina Rossetti, Uphill
855(1)
FURTHER READING: Allegory
856(1)
Adrienne Rich, Diving into the Wreck
856 (3)
Allusion
859(1)
Wok Soyinka, Future Plans
859(1)
William Meredith, Dreams of Suicide
860(1)
FURTHER READING: Allusion
861(1)
Maxine Kumin, Where Any of Us
861 (1)
Myth
862(1)
Countee Cullen, Yet Do I Marvel
863(1)
FURTHER READING: Myth
864(1)
William Butler Yeats, Leda and the Swan
864 (1)
Derek Walcott, Sea Grapes
865(1)
W.H. Auden, Museé des Beaux Arts
866 (2)
T.S. Eliot, Journey of the Magi
868(4)
Checklist: Writing about Symbol, Allegory, Allusion, Myth
870(1)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Symbol, Allegory, Allusion, Myth
871(1)
32 DISCOVERING THEMES IN POETRY
872 (55)
Poems about Parents
872(1)
Theodore Roethke, My Papa's Waltz
873(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay, The courage that my mother had
874(1)
Raymond Carver, Photograph of my Father in His Twenty-Second Year
874(1)
Judith Ortiz Cofer, My Father in the Navy: A Childhood Memory
875(1)
Mitsuye Yamada, The Night Before Good-bye
875 (1)
Wanda Coleman, Dear Mama
876(1)
Dylan Thomas, Do not go gentle into that good night
877(1)
Poems about Nature
878(1)
William Wordsworth, I wandered lonely as a cloud
878 (1)
Christina Rossetti, Summer
879(1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins, The Windhover
880(1)
Robert Frost, Birches
880(2)
William Stafford, Traveling through the Dark
882 (1)
Joy Harjo, Morning Song
882(1)
Poems about Love
883(1)
Robert Browning, Meeting at Night
883(1)
Robert Browning, Parting at Morning
884(1)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning, How Do I Love Thee?
884(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay, What Lips My Lips Have Kissed
884(1)
Dorothy Parker, General Review of the Sex Situation
885(1)
Poems of War
885(1)
Rupert Brooke, The Soldier
886(1)
Wilfred Owen, Dulce et Decorum Est
887(1)
William Butler Yeats, An Irish Airman Foresees His Death
888(1)
Robert Lowell, For the Union Dead
888 (2)
Denise Levertov, What Were They Like?
890 (1)
Yusef Komunyakaa, Facing It
891(1)
Carl Phillips, On the Notion of Tenderness in Wartime
892(1)
Wislawa Szymborska, The End and the Beginning
892(2)
33 THE POETRY OF LANGSTON HUGHES: A CASEBOOK FOR READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING
894(5)
Langston Hughes, The Negro Speaks of Rivers
899 (1)
Langston Hughes, Mother to Son
899(1)
Langston Hughes, Dream Variations
900 (1)
Langston Hughes, The Weary Blues
900 (1)
Langston Hughes, I, Too
901(1)
Langston Hughes, Song for a Dark Girl
902 (1)
Langston Hughes, Ballad of the Landlord
902 (1)
Langston Hughes, Theme for English B
903 (1)
Langston Hughes, Dream Boogie
904(1)
Langston Hughes, Birmingham Sunday (September 15, 1963)
905(2)
Langston Hughes, Lenox Avenue: Midnight
907 (1)
Langston Hughes, Un-American Investigators
908 (1)
Langston Hughes, Dinner Guest: Me
909(1)
Langston Hughes, from The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain
910(2)
Langston Hughes, To Negro Writers
912 (2)
Langston Hughes, from My Adventures as a Social Poet
914(3)
Arnold Rampersad, from The Origins of Poetry in Langston Hughes
917(4)
Herman Beavers, from Dead Rocks and Sleeping Men: Aurality in the Aesthetic of Langston Hughes
921 (2)
Steven C. Tracy from "Midnight Ruffles of Cat-Gut Lace": The Boogie Poems of Langston Hughes
923(1)
Karen Jackson Ford, from Do Right to Write Right: Langston Hughes's Aesthetics of Simplicity
924(3)
George B. Hutchinson, from Langston Hughes and the 'Other' Whitman
927(8)
Topics for Further Research
928(97)
Student Paper: Challenging the Father/ Challenging the Self: Langston Hughes's "The Negro Speaks of Rivers"
929(6)
34 POETRY FOR FURTHER READING
935 (154)
Elizabeth Alexander, Apollo
935 (1)
Sherman J. Alexie, Defending Walt Whitman
936(1)
Maya Angelou, Africa
937(1)
Anonymous, Bonny Barbara Allan
938 (1)
Anonymous, Go Down Moses
939 (1)
Anonymous, Western Wind
940 (1)
Matthew Arnold, Dover Beach
940 (1)
Elizabeth Bishop, The Fish
941(2)
William Blake, The Lamb
943(1)
William Blake, To see a World in a Grain of Sand
944 (1)
William Blake, The Tyger
944(1)
Anne Bradstreet, The Author to Her Book
945 (1)
Gwendolyn Brooks, Medgar Evers
945(1)
George Gordon, Lord Byron, She Walks in Beauty
946 (1)
Thomas Campion, There is a garden in her face
946 (1)
Geoffrey Chaucer, from The Canterbury Tales
947(2)
Lucille Clifton, Praise Song
949(1)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kubla Khan
949 (2)
Billy Collins, Introduction to Poetry
951 (1)
Hart Crane, To Brooklyn Bridge
951(1)
E.E. Cummings, Buffalo Bill's
952(1)
E.E. Cummings, next to of course god america i
953(1)
Emily Dickinson, After great pain, a formal feeling comes
953(1)
Emily Dickinson, Because I could not stop for Death
954(1)
Emily Dickinson, "Faith" is a fine invention
954(1)
Emily Dickinson, I dwell in Possibility
955(1)
Emily Dickinson, I heard a Fly buzz—when I died
955(1)
Emily Dickinson, Success is counted sweetest
956 (1)
Emily Dickinson, Tell all the Truth but tell it slant
956(1)
Emily Dickinson, Wild Nights—Wild Nights!
956(1)
John Donne, Batter My Heart, Three-Personed God
957 (1)
John Donne, Death Be Not Proud
957(1)
John Donne, The Flea
957(1)
Rita Dove, Fox Trot Fridays
958(1)
Paul Laurence Dunbar, We Wear the Mask
959(1)
Stephen Dunn, Waiting with Two Members of a Motorcycle Gang for My Child to Be Born
959(1)
T.S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
960 (4)
James A. Emanuel, Emmett Till
964(1)
Louise Erdrich, Indian Boarding School: The Runaways
964(1)
Robert Frost, Acquainted with the Night
965 (1)
Robert Frost, Design
966(1)
Robert Frost, Mending Wall
966(1)
Robert Frost, The Road Not Taken
967(1)
Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
968(1)
Federico Garcia Lorca, Arbolé Arbolé...
968(2)
Nikki Giovanni, Nikki-Rosa
970 (1)
H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), Helen
971(1)
Thomas Hardy, The Convergence of the Twain
971 (2)
Seamus Heaney, Mid-Term Break
973 (1)
Edward Hirsch, Fast Break
973 (1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins, God's Grandeur
974(1)
Ha Jin, Ways of Talking
975(1)
Mary Karr, A Blessing from My Sixteen Years' Son
975 (2)
John Keats, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad
977 (1)
John Keats, Ode on a Grecian Urn
978 (2)
John Keats, When I Have Fears
980 (1)
Aron Keesbury, On the Robbery across the Street
980 (1)
Yusef Komunyakaa, Ignis Fatuus
981 (1)
Ted Kooser, Selecting a Reader
982 (1)
Philip Larkin, Aubade
982(2)
Li-Young Lee, The Gift
984(1)
Archibald MacLeish, Ars Poetica
985(1)
Christopher Marlowe, The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
985(1)
Claude McKay, If We Must Die
986 (1)
James Merrill, Page from the Koran
987 (1)
W.S. Merwin, To My Brother
987 (1)
Pablo Neruda, The United Fruit Co.
988(1)
Sharon Olds, The One Girl at the Boys' Party
989 (1)
Judith Ortiz Cofer, Claims
990(1)
Linda Pastan, Marks
990(1)
Marge Piercy, Barbie Doll
991(1)
Robert Pinsky, Shirt
991(2)
Sylvia Plath, Mirror
993(1)
Ezra Pound, The River-Merchant's Wife: A Letter
993(1)
Sir Walter Raleigh, The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd
994(1)
Henry Reed, Naming of Parts
995(1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson, Miniver Cheevy
996 (1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson, Richard Cory
997 (1)
Sonia Sanchez, right on: white america
997 (1)
Carl Sandburg, Fog
998(1)
William Shakespeare, Let me not to the marriage of true minds
998(1)
William Shakespeare, Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
999(1)
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ode to the West Wind
999 (2)
Charles Simic, Old Soldier
1001(1)
Stevie Smith, Not Waving but Drowning
1002 (1)
Cathy Song, Lost Sister
1002(2)
Gary Soto, Saturday at the Canal
1004(1)
William Stafford, An Afternoon in the Stacks
1005 (1)
Wallace Stevens, Anecdote of the Jar
1005 (1)
Wallace Stevens, The Emperor of Ice-Cream
1005(1)
Mark Strand, 2032
1006(1)
Virgil Suárez, La Florida
1006(1)
Wislawa Szymborska, ABC
1007(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Ulysses
1008 (1)
Mona Van Duyn, In Bed with a Book
1009(1)
Phillis Wheatley, On Being Brought from Africa to America
1010(1)
Walt Whitman, A Noiseless Patient Spider
1010 (1)
Walt Whitman, from "Song of Myself"
1011 (1)
Richard Wilbur, Man Running
1012(1)
C.K. Williams, Doves
1013(2)
William Carlos Williams, The Dance
1015(1)
William Wordsworth, Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802
1015(1)
William Wordsworth, London, 1802
1016(1)
William Wordsworth, My heart leaps up when I behold
1016(1)
William Wordsworth, The Solitary Reaper
1016 (1)
Charles Wright, In Praise of Han Shan
1017(1)
William Butler Yeats, Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop
1018(1)
William Butler Yeats, The Lake Isle of Innisfree
1018(1)
William Butler Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium
1019 (1)
William Butler Yeats, The Second Coming
1020 (1)
Adam Zagajewski, Poetry Searches for Radiance
1020(3)
PART 4 DRAMA 1023(1)
35 UNDERSTANDING DRAMA
1025(604)
Origins of Modern Drama
1025(9)
The Ancient Greek Theater
1025(2)
The Elizabethan Theater
1027(4)
The Modern Theater
1031 (3)
Tragedy and Comedy
1034 (6)
Tragedy
1034 (3)
Comedy
1037 (3)
Defining Drama
1040(1)
A Note on Translations
1040 (2)
Recognizing Kinds of Drama
1042(1)
Anton Chekhov, The Brute
1043(12)
36 DRAMA SAMPLER: TEN-MINUTE PLAYS
1055(1)
Jane Martin, Beauty
1055(5)
José Rivera, Tape
1060(4)
Arlene Hutton, I Dream Before I Take the Stand
1064(14)
Warren Leight, Nine Ten
1078(6)
37 READING AND WRITING ABOUT DRAMA
1084(1)
Reading Drama
1084(2)
Active Reading
1085 (1)
Writing about Drama
1086(18)
Planning an Essay
1086(3)
Drafting an Essay
1089(3)
Student Paper: The Women's Role in Trifles (First Draft)
1090(2)
Revising and Editing an Essay
1092(12)
Student Paper: Confinement and Rebellion in Trifles (Second Draft)
1093(5)
Student Paper: Desperate Measures: Acts of Defiance in Trifles (Final Draft)
1098(6)
38 PLOT
1104(3)
Plot Structure
1104(2)
Plot and Subplot
1105(1)
Plot Development
1106(2)
Flashbacks
1107(1)
Foreshadowing
1107(14)
Checklist: Writing about Plot
1107(1)
Susan Glaspell, Trifles
1108 (13)
Henrik Ibsen, A Doll House
1121(57)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Plot
1176(1)
39 CHARACTER
1177 (1)
Characters' Words
1178(5)
Formal and Informal Language
1179(1)
Plain and Elaborate Language
1180(2)
Tone
1182 (1)
Irony
1182(1)
Characters' Actions
1183(1)
Stage Directions
1184(1)
Actors' Interpretations
1185(3)
Checklist: Writing about Character
1187 (1)
August Strindberg, The Stronger
1188 (5)
David Auburn, Proof
1193(55)
Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman
1248 (74)
William Shakespeare, Hamlet
1322(104)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Character
1425(1)
40 STAGING
1426(2)
Stage Directions
1426 (2)
The Uses of Staging
1428(3)
Costumes
1428(1)
Props and Furnishings
1428(1)
Scenery and Lighting
1429(1)
Music and Sound Effects
1429(2)
Checklist: Writing about Staging
1430(1)
Sophocles, Oedipus the King
1431(43)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Staging
1473(1)
41 THEME
1474(12)
Titles
1474(1)
Conflicts
1475 (1)
Dialogue
1476 (1)
Characters
1476 (1)
Staging
1477(1)
Checklist: Writing about Theme
1478(1)
David Henry Hwang, Trying to Find Chinatown
1478(8)
August Wilson, Fences
1486(57)
WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Theme
1539(1)
42 TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'S THE GLASS MENAGERIE: A CASEBOOK FOR READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING
1540 (74)
Tennessee Williams, The Glass Menagerie
1543 (50)
Tennessee Williams, Author's Production Notes (Preface to the Published Edition)
1593(2)
Jacqueline O'Connor, from Dramatizing Dementia: Madness in the Plays of Tennessee Williams
1595 (1)
Tennessee Williams, from Tennessee Williams: Memoirs
1596(3)
Jean Evans, Interview 1945
1599(4)
Thomas L.L. King, from Irony and Distance in The Glass Menagerie 1600 g r
Nancy Marie Patterson Tischler, from Student Companion to Tennessee Williams
1603(2)
Roger B. Stein, from The Glass Menagerie Revisited: Catastrophe without Violence
1605(2)
Tom Scanlan, from Family, Drama, and American Dreams
1607(3)
James Fisher, from "The Angels of Fructification": Tennessee Williams, Tony Kushner, and Images of Homosexuality on the American Stage
1610(4)
Tennessee Williams, Portrait of a Girl in Glass
1614(16)
Topics for Further Research
1621(9)
Student Paper: Laura's Gentleman Caller
1622(7)
Appendix: Using Literary Criticism in Your Writing 1629(1)
Formalism
1629
A Formalist Reading: Kate Chopin's "The Storm"
1630(2)
FOR FURTHER READING: Formalism
1631(1)
Reader-Response Criticism
1631(1)
Reader-Response Readings: Kate Chopin's "The Storm"
1632(4)
FOR FURTHER READING: Reader-Response Criticism
1633(1)
Sociological Criticism
1634(1)
Feminist Criticism
1635(1)
A Feminist Reading: Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing"
1636(2)
FOR FURTHER READING: Feminist Criticism
1636(1)
Marxist Criticism
1637(1)
A Marxist Reading: Tillie Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing"
1638(2)
FOR FURTHER READING: Marxist Criticism
1638(1)
New Historicism
1639(1)
A New Historicist Reading: Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper"
1640(3)
FOR FURTHER READING: New Historicist Criticism
1641(1)
Psychoanalytic Criticism
1641(2)
A Psychoanalytic Reading: Edgar Allan Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"
1643(2)
FOR FURTHER READING: Psychoanalytic Criticism
1644 (1)
Structuralism
1644(1)
A Structuralist Reading: William Faulkner's "Barn Burning"
1645(2)
FOR FURTHER READING: Structuralism
1646(1)
Deconstruction
1646(1)
A Deconstructionist Reading: Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard to Find"
1647
FOR FURTHER READING: Deconstruction
1648
Glossary of Literary Terms G1
Credits C1
Index of First Lines of Poetry I1
Index of Authors and Titles I5
Index of Literary Terms I14


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