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Comparative Criminal Justice Systems : A Topical Approach,9780130912879
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Comparative Criminal Justice Systems : A Topical Approach

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130912879

ISBN10:
0130912875
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL

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Summary

Now in its third edition, "Comparative Criminal Justice Systems" offers an expanded and updated look at how criminal justice is practiced around the world. With topical coverage of how different countries handle police, courts, and corrections, author Philip Reichel contrasts the American CJ system with several others around the globe, and offers suggestions for change. A must-read for any serious criminal justice student, "Comparative Criminal Justice Systems" is a book that can be read and appreciated internationally.

Table of Contents

Taking an International Perspective
1(28)
Why Study the Legal System of Other Countries?
3(8)
Provincial Benefits of an International Perspective
4(1)
Universal Benefits of an International Perspective
5(6)
Approaches to an International Perspective
11(3)
Historical Approach
11(1)
Political Approach
12(1)
Descriptive Approach
13(1)
Strategies Under the Descriptive Approach
14(5)
The Functions/Procedures Strategy
14(2)
The Institutions/Actors Strategy
16(3)
Comparison Through Classification
19(6)
The Need for Classification
20(1)
Classification Strategies
20(2)
The Role of Classification in This Book
22(3)
The Structure of This Book
25(2)
Summary
27(1)
Web Sites to Visit
27(1)
Suggested Readings
28(1)
Crime on the World Scene
29(27)
The Crime Problem
30(4)
Uniform Crime Reports
31(2)
National Crime Victimization Survey
33(1)
Comparing Crime Rates
34(8)
Crime Data Sets
36(3)
Victimization Data Set
39(3)
Crime Trends and Crime Theories
42(12)
Crime Trends
43(6)
Crime Theories
49(5)
Summary
54(1)
Web Sites to Visit
54(1)
Suggested Readings
55(1)
An American Perspective on Criminal Law
56(21)
Essential Ingredients of Justice Systems
57(18)
Substantive Criminal Law
59(7)
Procedural Criminal Law
66(9)
Summary
75(1)
Web Sites to Visit
75(1)
Suggested Readings
76(1)
Legal Traditions
77(38)
Legal Systems and Legal Traditions
78(3)
Today's Four Legal Traditions
81(23)
Common Legal Tradition
83(4)
Civil Legal Tradition
87(5)
Socialist Legal Tradition
92(6)
Islamic (Religious/Philosophical) Legal Tradition
98(6)
Comparing the Legal Traditions
104(9)
Cultural Component
105(3)
Substantive Component
108(2)
Procedural Component
110(3)
Summary
113(1)
Web Sites to Visit
114(1)
Suggested Readings
114(1)
Substantive Law and Procedural Law in the Four Legal Traditions
115(34)
Substantive Criminal Law
116(12)
General Characteristics and Major Principles
116(3)
Substantive Law in the Common Legal Tradition
119(2)
Substantive Law in the Civil Legal Tradition
121(3)
Substantive Law in the Socialist Legal Tradition
124(1)
Substantive Law in the Islamic Legal Tradition
125(3)
Procedural Criminal Law
128(19)
Adjudicatory Processes
129(7)
Judicial Review
136(11)
Summary
147(1)
Web Sites to Visit
147(1)
Suggested Readings
148(1)
An International Perspective on Policing
149(37)
Classifying Police Structures
151(25)
Centralized Single Systems: Nigeria
153(2)
Decentralized Single Systems: Japan
155(4)
Centralized Multiple Coordinated Systems: France
159(5)
Decentralized Multiple Coordinated Systems: Germany
164(4)
Centralized Multiple Uncoordinated Systems: Spain
168(3)
Decentralized Multiple Uncoordinated Systems: Mexico
171(5)
Policing Issues: Police Misconduct
176(2)
Policing Issues: Global Cooperation
178(5)
ICPO---Interpol
179(2)
Europol
181(1)
The Amsterdam Treaty/ Schengen Agreement
182(1)
Summary
183(1)
Web Sites to Visit
184(1)
Suggested Readings
184(2)
An International Perspective on Courts
186(49)
Professional Actors in the Judiciary
188(12)
Variation in Legal Training
188(3)
Variation in Prosecution
191(7)
Variation in Defense
198(2)
The Adjudicators
200(16)
Presumption of Innocence
203(1)
Professional Judges
204(3)
Lay Judges and Jurors
207(3)
Examples along the Adjudication Continuum
210(6)
Variation in Court Organization
216(17)
France
217(3)
England
220(3)
Nigeria
223(3)
China
226(4)
Saudi Arabia
230(3)
Summary
233(1)
Web Sites to Visit
234(1)
Suggested Readings
234(1)
An International Perspective on Corrections
235(38)
Variability in Justification
238(3)
Imprisonment as Punishment
241(4)
Determining Imprisonment Rates
241(4)
Using Imprisonment to Maintain Social Order
245(1)
Corrections in Australia
245(11)
Australia's History of Transportation
246(3)
Contemporary Australian Corrections
249(1)
Prisons in Australia
250(6)
Corrections in Poland
256(8)
Sentencing Options in Poland
258(2)
The Use of Imprisonment in Poland
260(1)
Preliminary Detention in Poland
261(1)
Prisons in Poland
261(1)
Community Placement in Poland
262(2)
Corrections in Japan
264(5)
Sentencing Options in Japan
265(1)
Prisons in Japan
266(1)
Community-Based Services in Japan
266(3)
Corrections Issues: Prison Alternatives
269(2)
Summary
271(1)
Web Sites to Visit
271(1)
Suggested Readings
272(1)
An International Perspective on Juvenile Justice
273(28)
Delinquency as a Worldwide Problem
275(4)
The Setting of International Standards
276(1)
Determining who are Juveniles
277(2)
Determining the Process
279(1)
Models of Juvenile Justice
279(20)
Welfare Model
280(5)
Legalistic Model
285(4)
Corporatist Model
289(5)
Participatory Model
294(5)
Summary
299(1)
Web Sites to Visit
300(1)
Suggested Readings
300(1)
Japan: Examples of Effectiveness and Borrowing
301(43)
Why Study Japan?
302(4)
Japan's Effective Criminal Justice System
303(2)
Borrowing in a Cross-Cultural Context
305(1)
Japanese Cultural Traits
306(5)
Homogeneity
307(1)
Contextualism and Harmony
308(1)
Collectivism
309(1)
Hierarchies and Order
310(1)
Criminal Law
311(4)
Law by Bureaucratic Informalism
314(1)
Policing
315(6)
Why Are the Japanese Police Effective?
315(6)
Judiciary
321(11)
Pretrial Activities
323(5)
Trial Options
328(4)
Judgments
332(1)
Corrections
332(6)
History
332(2)
Aspects of Effectiveness
334(4)
Coming Full Circle
338(1)
What Might Work?
339(3)
Summary
342(1)
Web Sites to Visit
343(1)
Suggested Readings
343(1)
References 344(23)
Index 367


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