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The Composition of Everyday Life + Infotrac: A Guide to Writing,9780838462355
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The Composition of Everyday Life + Infotrac: A Guide to Writing

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780838462355

ISBN10:
0838462359
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/23/2003
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $79.66

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Summary

Showing students that the act of writing is connected to everyday living, Composition of Everyday Life, Brief Edition makes invention the primary component of writing and helps students re-discover concepts, uncover meaning, and re-think the world around them.

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. REMEMBERING WHO YOU WERE
Chapter Readings
Cindy Bosley, How I Lost the Junior Miss Pageant
Len Kress, Beat Education
Aunty D, The Aloha Spirit: A Reminiscence
Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak, The Thrill of Victory
The Agony of Parents
Steve Mockensturm The Grapes of Mrs
Rath
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Considering Your Thesis
Narration
Scenarios
Allusion
Dialogue
Organizational Strategies
What Details Should I Include? How Should I Begin? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice
Using Figurative Language
Choosing Details
Using Slang
Choosing Allusions
Revision Strategies
Peer Revision
Global Revision
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
2. EXPLAINING RELATIONSHIPS
Chapter Readings
Jessie Thuma, The Ring of Truth: My Child is Growing Up
John Steinbeck, Americans and the Land
Cindy Bosley, What the Honey Meant
David Hawes, Dog Tied
Dean Meek, Friend or Foe
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Considering Your Thesis
Using Narration
Using Description
Using Figurative Language
Organizational Strategies
How Should I Begin? Where Should My Thesis or Main Point Go? What Should I Conclude? When Should I Change Paragraphs? How Should I Make Transitions? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice
Writing Whispers
Writing Yells
Writing Pace
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
3. OBSERVING
Chapter Readings
Annie Dillard, Living Like Weasels
Edward Abbey, Planting a Tree
Jane Goodall, Gombe
Chester McCovey, The Front Porch
Dean Meek, A Building of Mailboxes
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact: Finding a Subject to Observe
Analysis: What Meaning Can I Discover? Public Resonance: How Does This Matter to Others? Delivery
Rhetorical Tools: Focusing and Developing the Idea
Articulating Your Thesis
Using Details
Using Narrative
Using Allusions
Using Simile/Metaphor
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
How Should I Deal with Public Resonance? How Should I Arrange Details? When Should I Change Paragraphs? Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
The Present "I"
The Invisible "I"
Level of Formality
Projecting Wonder
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision
Considering Consequences
The Consequences of Your Essay
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
The Consequences of Everyday Observations
Everyday Rhetoric
Writing, Speech, and Action Exploring Visual Rhetoric
4. ANALYZING CONCEPTS
Chapter Readings
Pico Iyer, In Praise of the Humble Comma
S
Hayakawa, What it Means to be Creative
Steven M
Richardson, College: What's in it for Me? Simon Benlow, Have It Your Way
Dan Wilkins, Why We No Longer Use the 'H' Word
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
Analysis: What Does It Mean? Public Resonance: How Does It Matter to Others? Delivery
Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Ideas
Considering Your Thesis
Developing Support
Using Definitions
Using Outside Sources
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
How Should I Begin? When Should I Begin Paragraphs? Where Should My Thesis Go? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
Using Metaphor
Using Allusions
Promoting Curiosity
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
The Consequences of Everyday Writing
Everyday Rhetoric
Writing, Speech, and Action Exploring Visual Rhetoric
5. MAKING ARGUMENTS
Chapter Readings
Ward Churchill, Crimes Against Humanity
David Crabtree, Why a Great Books Education is the Most Practical
Ann Marie Paulin, Cruelty, Civility, and Other Weighty Matters
Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak, Don't Make Me a Has-Bean! Therese Cherry, Beware of Drug Sales
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Main Claim/Thesis
Public Resonance
Scope
Arguability
Support
Kinds of Evidence
Kinds of Appeals
Counter-Argument
Using Counterargument to Develop Points
Using Counterargument to Qualify Your Thesis
Evolution of a Thesis: Point of Contact to
Argumentative Claim
Concession
Caution: Logical Fallacies Ahead
Organizational Strategies
The Writer's Voice
Revision Strategies
Peer Revision
Global Revision
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
6. RESPONDING TO ARGUMENTS
Chapter Readings
Betsy Taylor, Response to Juliet Schor
Alice Walker, My Daughter Smokes
Daniel Bruno, Entitlement Education
Ann F
Causey, Is Hunting Ethical? Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Thesis
Using Support
Counter-Arguing
Conceding and Qualifying Points
Remembering Logical Fallacies
Organizational Strategies
Should I Quote the Original Argument? Summary
Paraphrase
How Much of the Argument Should I Concede? How Should I Structure My Response? Writer's Voice
Avoid Harsh Description
Avoid Character Slams
Consider Tone
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
7. EVALUATING
Chapter Readings
Roger Ebert, Star Wars
Jayme Stayer, Whales R Us
Ed Bell, The Andy Griffith Show: Return to Normal
Simon Benlow, Pulp Fiction: Valuable Critique or Useless Titillation? Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Re-Thinking Divorce
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
The Elements of Evaluation
Summary/ Presentation
Analysis
Argument
Using Support about the Subject
Using Support outside the Subject
Organizational Strategies
Writer's Voice
Global Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
8. SEARCHING FOR CAUSES
Chapter Readings
Juliet Schor, The New Politics of Consumption
Leonard Kress, Throwing Up Childhood
Deborah Tannen, Sex, Lies, and Advertising
Susan Jacoby, When Bright Girls Decide That Math Is a 'Waste of Time'
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Considering Your Thesis
Developing Support
Counter-Argument
Concession
Organizational Strategies
Where Should I Explain the Phenomenon? How Should I Deal with Other Causes? How Should I Include Outside Sources? Writer's Voice
Becoming an Authority
Projecting Wonder
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric? 9. PROPOSING SOLUTIONS
Chapter Readings
Rachel Carson, The Obligation to Endure
Joan Didion, In Bed
Paul Roberts, How to Say Nothing in 500 Words
Ed Bell, Technology, Movement, and Sound
Dan Wilkins, Thoughts on the International Access Symbol
Rose Bachtel, Television: Destroying Childhood
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Articulating Your Thesis
Using Support
Discovering Counter-Arguments
Considering Alternative Solutions
Caution: Logical Fallacies Ahead
Organizational Strategies
How Should I Separate
Problem and Solution? How Should I Include Counter-Arguments? Where Should I Put Alternative Solutions? How Should I Include Concessions? Writer's Voice
Creating Reasonable Tone
Making Concessions
Avoiding Harsh Description
Avoiding Character Slams
Inviting the Reader
Using Verb Mood
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
10. EXPLORING THE ARTS
Chapter Readings
Artistic Works
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings
Joy Harjo, Fire
Matthew Arnold, Dover Beach
U2, Running to Stand Still
Essays Exploring the Arts
Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, The Plight of High Status Women
Chester McCovey, The Parting Breath of the Now Perfect Woman
Geoffrey Bennett, Hip-Hop: A oadblock or Pathway to Black Empowerment? Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Discovering Your Thesis
Developing Support
Considering Counter-Argument
Considering Concession
Using the Elements of Evaluation
Organizational Strategies
Where Should I Summarize or Detail the Work? How Much Detail Should I Include? How Should I Begin? How Should I Integrate Lines of Songs, Poems, or Stories? Writer's Voice
Avoiding the Enthusiasm Crisis
Promoting Wonder
Considering the Tone of the Art
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric? 11. THINKING RADICALLY
Chapter Readings
Wendell Berry, Farming and the Global Economy
Michael Moore, Why Doesn't G
Sell Crack? Christiane Northrup, M
The Menstrual Cycle
Simon Benlow, An Apology to Future Generations
Outside Reading
Invention
Point of Contact
Analysis
Public Resonance
Delivery
Rhetorical Tools
Considering Your Thesis
Developing Support
Using Allusions
Using Definitions
Using Outside Sources
Organizational Strategies
How Should I Begin? How Should I Deal with Counterarguments? Where Should My Thesis Go? How Should I Conclude? Writer's Voice
Projecting Wonder
Appealing to the Possible
Revision Strategies
Peer Review
Global Revision Questions
Considering Consequences
Everyday Rhetoric
12. RESEARCH and WRITING (GATHERING AND USING INFORMATION FROM SOURCES)
Introduction
Why Get Information from Sources? When to Get Information from Sources
Where to Get Information from Sources
What is Plagiarism? Why Document Sources
Formal Versus Informal Documentation
A Word of Caution about Web Sites
Primary Research: Observation, Interviews, Surveys
Observations
Field Notes
Interviews
Asking the Right Questions
Asking Follow-up Questions
Surveys
Generating Questions
Choosing Respondents
Recording Responses
Secondary Research: Print and Electronic Sources
Searching the Library and the Internet
The Library
The Internet
The Sources of Information
Books
Periodicals
Newspapers
Government Documents
Reference Books
Audio-Visual Materials
Web Sites
Evaluating Sources
Relevance
Reliability
Timeliness
Diversity
Electronic Sources
Taking Notes on Secondary Sources
The Note
Paraphrase
Summary
Quotation
The Source
The Page Number
The Topic
Using Information from Sources
Organization and Sources
Counter-Arguing Sources
Textual Cues
Paragraph Transitions
Integrating the Paraphrase
Summary and Quotation
Paraphrase
Summary
Quotation
Integrating Quotations
Punctuating Quotations
1. Quotation Marks Only
2, Speaking Verb Followed by a Comma
3. Complete Though
Followed by a Colon
Special Conditions in Quoting
Omitting Words
Adding Words
Noting an Error
Lengthy Quotes
Double Quotes
The Basic Concepts of Documentation Style: MLA and APA
Documenting Sources: MLA
In-Text Citation
Works Cited
Documenting Sources: APA
In-Text Citation
References List
Standard Abbreviations
Frequently Asked Questions
What Kind of Source Do I Have? 13. EVERYDAY RHETORIC
Letters
Memos
News Releases
Brochures
Posters and Fliers
E-Mail
Web Sites
Verbal Communication (Speeches, Briefings, and Discussions)
Visuals
Appendix: Subjects for Writing and Reading
Justice
The Environment
Consumerism
Human Relationships
Civic Engagement
Physical/Mental Health
Education
Culture and Everyday Life


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