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The Composition of Everyday Life Text + Infotrac: A Guide to Writing,9780155043077

The Composition of Everyday Life Text + Infotrac: A Guide to Writing

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780155043077

ISBN10:
0155043072
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/24/2003
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $86.33

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Summary

Showing students that the act of writing is connected to everyday living, THE COMPOSITION OF EVERYDAY LIFE, BRIEF EDITION makes invention the primary component of your writing course and helps students re-discover concepts, uncover meaning, and re-think the world around them.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments iii
Note to Instructors iv
Brief Table of Contents vi
Using CEL as a Thematic Reader xvi
Note to Students xx
Remembering Who You Were
2(56)
Readings
6(20)
``How I Lost the Junior Miss Pageant,''
6(5)
Cindy Bosley
``A Beat Education,''
11(3)
Leonard Kress
``The Aloha Spirit: A Reminiscence,''
14(4)
Aunty D.
``The Thrill of Victory . . . The Agony of Parents,''
18(4)
Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak
``The Grapes of Mrs. Rath,''
22(2)
Steve Mockensturm
Outside Reading
24(2)
Invention
26(10)
Point of Contact: Looking Back
26(4)
Analysis: Finding the Significance
30(4)
Public Resonance: Involving Others
34(2)
Delivery
36(16)
Rhetorical Tools: Focusing and Developing the Idea
36(1)
Considering Your Thesis
36(2)
Developing Support
38(2)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
40(1)
What Details Should I Include?
40(2)
How Should I Begin?
42(1)
How Should I Conclude?
43(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
44(1)
Using Figurative Language
44(1)
Choosing Details
45(1)
Choosing Allusions
46(1)
Using Sentence Length
46(1)
Learning about Voice
47(1)
Revision Strategies
48(1)
Global Revision Questions
49(1)
Peer Review
50(1)
Exploring Ideas in Groups (Peer Review)
51(1)
Considering Consequences
52(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
52(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
53(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Writing
53(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
54(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
54(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
55(3)
Explaining Relationships
58(50)
Readings
62(18)
``The Ring of Truth: My Child Is Growing Up,''
62(3)
Jessie Thuma
``Americans and the Land,''
65(5)
John Steinbeck
``What the Honey Meant,''
70(4)
Cindy Bosley
``Dog-Tied,''
74(2)
David Hawes
``Friend or Foe,''
76(3)
Dean A. Meek
Outside Reading
79(1)
Invention
80(10)
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
80(4)
Analysis: Exploring the Relationship
84(4)
Public Resonance: Why Does This Topic Matter to Others?
88(2)
Delivery
90(12)
Rhetorical Tools: Focusing and Developing the Idea
90(1)
Considering Your Thesis
90(4)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
94(1)
How Should I Begin?
94(1)
Where Should My Thesis or Main Point Go?
95(1)
What Should I Include?
95(1)
When Should I Change Paragraphs?
95(1)
How Should I Make Transitions?
96(1)
How Should I Conclude?
97(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
98(1)
Writerly Whispers (Ways to Draw Readers in Closer)
98(1)
Writerly Yells (Ways to Give Emphasis)
98(1)
Writerly Pace (Ways to Control Speed and Time)
99(1)
Revision Strategies
100(1)
Global Revision Questions
101(1)
Considering Consequences
102(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
102(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
103(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Writing
103(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
104(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
104(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
105(3)
Observing
108(52)
Readings
112(22)
``Living Like Weasels,''
112(4)
Annie Dillard
``Planting a Tree,''
116(3)
Edward Abbey
``Gombe,''
119(8)
Jane Goodall
``The Front Porch,''
127(3)
Chester McCovey
``A Building of Mailboxes,''
130(3)
Dean A. Meek
Outside Reading
133(1)
Invention
134(8)
Point of Contact: Finding a Subject to Observe
134(3)
Explore Your Invention Process
137(1)
Analysis: What Meaning Can I Discover?
138(2)
Public Resonance: How Does This Matter to Others?
140(2)
Delivery
142(12)
Rhetorical Tools: Focusing and Developing the Idea
142(1)
Articulating Your Thesis
142(1)
Using Details
143(1)
Using Narrative
144(1)
Using Allusions
144(1)
Using Simile and Metaphor
145(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
146(1)
How Should I Deal with Public Resonance?
146(1)
How Should I Arrange Details?
147(1)
When Should I Change Paragraphs?
148(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
149(1)
The Present ``I''
149(1)
The Invisible ``I''
150(1)
Level of Formality
150(2)
Revision Strategies
152(1)
Global Revision Questions
153(1)
Considering Consequences
154(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
154(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
155(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Observations
155(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
156(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
156(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
157(3)
Analyzing Concepts
160(46)
Readings
164(16)
``In Praise of the Humble Comma,''
164(3)
Pico Iyer
``What it Means to Be Creative,''
167(2)
S.I. Hayakawa
``College: What's in It for Me?''
169(3)
Steven M. Richardson
``'Have It Your Way': Consumerism Invades Education,''
172(3)
Simon Benlow
``Why We No Longer Use the `H' Word,''
175(4)
Dan Wilkins
Outside Reading
179(1)
Invention
180(10)
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
180(4)
Analysis: What Does It Mean?
184(4)
Public Resonance: How Does It Matter to Others?
188(2)
Delivery
190(10)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Ideas
190(1)
Considering Your Thesis
190(1)
Developing Support
191(1)
Using Definitions
192(1)
Using Outside Sources
193(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
194(1)
How Should I Begin?
194(1)
If I Started with a Television Program or Advertisement, How Should I Work That into the Essay?
194(1)
When Should I Change Paragraphs?
194(1)
Where Should My Thesis Go?
195(1)
How Should I Conclude?
195(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
196(1)
Using Metaphor
196(1)
Using Allusions
196(1)
Promoting Curiosity
197(1)
Revision Strategies
198(1)
Global Revision Questions
199(1)
Considering Consequences
200(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
200(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
200(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Writing
201(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
202(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
202(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
203(3)
Making Arguments
206(64)
Readings
210(24)
``Crimes Against Humanity,''
210(7)
Ward Churchill
``Why a Great Books Education Is the Most Practicall,''
217(4)
David Crabtree
``Cruelty, Civility, and Other Weighty Matters,''
221(6)
Ann Marie Paulin
``Don't Make Me a Has-Bean!''
227(3)
Jennifer Schwind-Pawlak
``Beware of Drug Sales,''
230(2)
Therese Cherry
Outside Reading
232(2)
Invention
234(8)
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
234(4)
Analysis: What Does It Mean?
238(2)
Public Resonance: How Does This Issue Matter to Others?
240(2)
Delivery
242(22)
Rhetorical Tools: Persuading Your Readers
242(1)
Main Claim/Thesis
243(1)
Support
244(2)
Counterargument
246(4)
Concession
250(2)
Caution: Logical Fallacies Ahead
252(4)
Organizational Strategies: Arranging Your Argument
256(1)
How Should I Begin?
256(1)
How Should I Include Evidence?
256(1)
Where Should I Put Counterarguments?
256(1)
How Should I Make Transitions?
257(1)
Writer's Voice: Finding an Appropriate Strategy
258(1)
Making Concessions
258(1)
Avoiding Harsh Description
259(1)
Avoiding Character Slams and Preaching Problems
259(1)
Talking with, Not Arguing at, Readers
260(2)
Revision Strategies
262(1)
Global Revision Questions
263(1)
Considering Consequences
264(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
264(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
265(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Arguments
265(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
266(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
266(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
267(3)
Responding to Arguments
270(50)
Readings
274(20)
``Response to Juliet Schor,''
274(4)
Betsy Taylor
``My Daughter Smokes,''
278(3)
Alice Walker
``Entitlement Education,''
281(5)
Daniel Bruno
``Is Hunting Ethical?''
286(7)
Ann F. Causey
Outside Reading
293(1)
Invention
294(8)
Point of Contact: Finding an Argument
294(2)
Analysis: How Does the Argument Work?
296(1)
Toulmin's Analytical Tools
296(4)
Public Resonance: How Does the Topic Matter to Others?
300(2)
Delivery
302(12)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Own Argument
302(1)
Considering Your Thesis
302(2)
Using Support
304(1)
Counterarguing
304(1)
Conceding and Qualifying Points
304(1)
Remembering Logical Fallacies
305(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
306(1)
Should I Quote the Original Argument?
306(1)
How Should I Structure My Response?
307(1)
How Can I Integrate Toulminian Analysis, Argument, and Counterargument?
308(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
309(1)
Avoiding Character Slams
309(1)
The Invisible/Present ``I''
310(1)
Consider Tone
311(1)
Revision Strategies
312(1)
Global Revision Questions
312(2)
Considering Consequences
314(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
314(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
315(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Responses
315(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
316(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
316(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
317(3)
Evaluating
320(50)
Readings
324(20)
``Star Wars,''
324(4)
Roger Ebert
``Whales R Us,''
328(6)
Jayme Stayer
``The Andy Griffith Show: Return to Normal,''
334(3)
Ed Bell
``Pulp Fiction: Valuable Critique or Useless Titillation?''
337(3)
Simon Benlow
``Rethinking Divorce,''
340(3)
Barbara Dafoe Whitehead
Outside Reading
343(1)
Invention
344(8)
Point of Contact: Finding a Subject in Everyday Life
344(4)
Analysis: Discovering and Applying Criteria
348(1)
Analyzing the Subject to Discover Appropriate Criteria
348(1)
Applying Criteria to the Subject
349(1)
Public Resonance: How Does This Subject Involve Others?
350(2)
Delivery
352(12)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing the Evaluative Argument
352(1)
Considering Your Thesis
352(1)
Using the Elements of Evaluation
353(2)
Using Support about the Subject
355(1)
Using Support outside the Subject
355(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
356(1)
How Should I Arrange the Elements of Evaluation?
356(1)
How Should I Include Support outside of the Subject?
357(1)
When Should I Change Paragraphs?
357(1)
How Should I Deal with Counterargument?
358(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
359(1)
Avoiding the Harsh Description
359(1)
Avoiding the Enthusiasm Crisis
359(1)
Exploring the Boundaries
360(2)
Revision Strategies
362(1)
Global Revision Questions
363(1)
Considering Consequences
364(3)
The Consequences of Your Essay
364(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
365(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Evaluations
366(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
367(3)
Writing, Speech, and Action
367(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
368(2)
Searching for Causes
370(48)
Readings
374(20)
``The New Politics of Consumption: Why Americans Want So Much More Than They Need,''
374(6)
Juliet Schor
``Throwing Up Childhood,''
380(5)
Leonard Kress
``Sex, Lies, and Conversation: Why Is It So Hard for Men and Women to Talk to Each Other?,''
385(5)
Deborah Tannen
``When Bright Girls Decide That Math Is a `Waste of Time,'''
390(3)
Susan Jacoby
Outside Reading
393(1)
Invention
394(8)
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
394(3)
Analysis: What's the Cause?
397(2)
Using Outside Sources
399(1)
Using Surveys
399(1)
Public Resonance: How Does This Matter to Others?
400(2)
Delivery
402(10)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing the Argument
402(1)
Considering Your Thesis
402(1)
Developing Support
403(1)
Counterarguing
404(1)
Conceding
405(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
406(1)
Where Should I Explain the Phenomenon?
406(1)
How Should I Deal with Other Causes?
406(1)
How Should I Include Outside Sources?
407(1)
How Should I Use Paragraphs?
407(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
408(1)
Creating Credibility
408(1)
Projecting Wonder
409(1)
Avoiding Preachiness
409(1)
Revision Strategies
410(1)
Global Revision Questions
411(1)
Considering Consequences
412(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
412(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
413(1)
Causes in Everyday Life
413(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
414(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
414(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
415(3)
Proposing Solutions
418(58)
Readings
422(26)
``The Obligation to Endure,''
422(6)
Rachel Carson
``In Bed,''
428(3)
Joan Didion
``How to Say Nothing in 500 Words,''
431(7)
Paul Roberts
``Technology, Movement, and Sound,''
438(3)
Ed Bell
``Thoughts on the International Access Symbol,''
441(3)
Dan Wilkins
``Television: Destroying Childhood,''
444(3)
Rose Bachtel
Outside Reading
447(1)
Invention
448(12)
Point of Contact: Finding a Topic in Everyday Life
448(1)
Using Images as a Point of Contact
449(3)
Analysis: Looking at Problems and Solutions
452(1)
Problems
452(2)
Solutions
454(2)
Public Resonance: How Does This Issue Matter to Others?
456(4)
Delivery
460(10)
Rhetorical Tools: Persuading Your Readers
460(1)
Articulating Your Thesis
460(2)
Discovering Counteraguments
462(1)
Considering Alternative Solutions
462(1)
Considering Logical Fallacies
463(1)
Organizational Strategies: Arranging Your Argument
464(1)
How Should I Separate Problem and Solution?
464(1)
How Should I Include Counterarguments?
464(1)
Where Should I Put Alternative Solutions?
465(1)
Writer's Voice: Finding an Appropriate Strategy
466(1)
Creating Reasonable Tone
466(1)
Inviting the Reader
466(1)
Considering Verb Mood
467(1)
Revision Strategies
468(1)
Global Revision Questions
469(1)
Considering Consequences
470(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
470(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
471(1)
The Consequences of Everyday Arguments
471(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
472(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
472(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
473(3)
Exploring the Arts
476(52)
Readings
480(22)
Artistic Works
``A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings,''
481(4)
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
``Fire,''
485(1)
Joy Harjo
``Dover Beach,''
486(1)
Matthew Arnold
``Running to Stand Still,'' U2
487(1)
Essays Exploring the Arts
``The Plight of High-Status Women,''
488(5)
Barbara Dafoe Whitehead
``The Parting Breath of the Now Perfect Woman,''
493(4)
Chester McCovey
``Hip-Hop: A Roadblock or Pathway to Black Empowerment?''
497(3)
Geoffrey Bennett
Outside Reading
500(2)
Invention
502(8)
Point of Contact: Finding Art in Everyday Life
502(1)
Recording the Basics
503(1)
Analysis: How Do the Elements Work?
504(1)
Themes
504(1)
Conflict
504(1)
Character Development
505(1)
Conventions
505(1)
Style
505(1)
Context
506(2)
Public Resonance: How Does the Subject Relate to Others?
508(2)
Delivery
510(12)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Ideas
510(1)
Discovering Your Thesis
510(2)
Developing Support
512(1)
Considering Counterargument
513(1)
Considering Concession
513(1)
Using the Elements of Evaluation
514(2)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Common Concerns
516(1)
Where Should I Summarize or Detail the Work?
516(1)
How Should I Begin?
516(1)
How Should I Integrate Lines of Songs, Poems, or Stories?
517(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
518(1)
Avoiding the Enthusiasm Crisis
518(1)
Avoiding Harsh Description
519(1)
Promoting Wonder
519(1)
Considering the Tone of the Art
519(1)
Revision Strategies
520(1)
Global Revision Questions
521(1)
Considering Consequences
522(2)
The Consequences of Your Essay
522(1)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
523(1)
The Consequences of Exploring Art in Everyday Life
523(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
524(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
524(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
525(3)
Thinking Radically: Re--Seeing the World
528(48)
Readings
532(20)
``Farming and the Global Economy,''
532(4)
Wendell Berry
``Why Doesn't GM Sell Crack?''
536(3)
Michael Moore
``The Menstrual Cycle,''
539(7)
Christiane Northrup
``An Apology to Future Generations,''
546(5)
Simon Benlow
Outside Reading
551(1)
Invention
552(8)
Point of Contact: Discovering a New Idea
552(1)
Imagining New Connections
553(1)
Imagining Different Possibilities
553(1)
Questioning Common Sense
553(1)
Exploring the Past and Future
554(1)
Going to the Root
554(1)
Analysis: Exploring Theory
555(2)
Overturning Conventional Wisdom
557(1)
Public Resonance: Connecting to Others
558(1)
Using Outside Sources
559(1)
Delivery
560(10)
Rhetorical Tools: Developing Your Thoughts
560(1)
Considering Your Thesis
560(1)
Using Narration
561(1)
Using Description
561(1)
Using Figurative Language
561(1)
Using Definitions
562(1)
Argumentative Support
562(1)
Counterargument
563(1)
Concession
563(1)
Toulminian Analysis
563(1)
Organizational Strategies: Addressing Special Concerns
564(1)
How Should I Begin?
564(1)
How Should I Make Connections to Conventional Thinking?
565(1)
How Should I Conclude?
565(1)
Writer's Voice: Exploring Options
566(1)
Inviting the Reader
566(1)
Considering Formality
567(1)
Projecting Wonder
567(1)
Revision Strategies
568(1)
Global Revision Questions
569(1)
Considering Consequences
570(2)
The Consequences of the Chapter Readings
571(1)
The Consequences of Thinking Radically in Everyday Life
571(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
572(4)
Writing, Speech, and Action
572(1)
Exploring Visual Rhetoric
573(3)
Research & Writing: Gathering and Using Information from Sources
576(66)
Basic Concepts
578(2)
Issues to Consider and Discuss
578(1)
Why Get Information from Sources?
578(1)
When to Get Information from Sources
578(1)
Where to Get Information from Sources
578(1)
What is Plagiarism?
579(1)
Why Document Sources
579(1)
Formal versus Informal Documentation
579(1)
Primary Research
580(6)
Observation, Interviews, Surveys
580(1)
Observation
580(2)
Interviews
582(2)
Surveys
584(2)
Secondary Research
586(22)
Print and Electronic Sources
586(1)
Searching the Library and the Internet
586(6)
Evaluating Sources
592(3)
Taking Notes on Sources
595(5)
Integrating Information from Sources
600(2)
Special Considerations for Organizing Sources
602(2)
Punctutating Quotations
604(2)
Special Conditions in Quoting
606(2)
Documenting Sources
608(34)
MLA Style
608(1)
In-Text Citation
608(2)
Works Cited
610(1)
Books
611(1)
Articles
612(2)
Other Sources
614(2)
Electronic Sources
616(2)
Sample Research Essay
618(6)
APA Style
624(1)
In-Text Citation
624(2)
References
626(1)
Books
627(1)
Articles
628(1)
Other Sources
629(1)
Electronic Sources
630(2)
APA Format
632(2)
Sample Research Essay
634(6)
Frequently Asked Questions
640(1)
What If I Don't Know What Type of Source I Have?
640(1)
How Do I Tell the Difference between a Journal and a Magazine?
640(1)
How Do I Find the Publication Information?
640(1)
How Do I Know the Page Numbers of an Electronic Source?
640(1)
Should I Use APA or MLA or What?
641(1)
Why Are There Different Documentation Styles?
641(1)
Standard Abbreviations
641(1)
Everyday Rhetoric
642(62)
Written Communication
646(26)
Letters
646(2)
Professional Letter
648(2)
Letter to the Editor
650(1)
Personal Letter
651(1)
Memos
652(2)
Memo to Michael Toth
654(2)
Memo to Faculty
656(1)
Memo to Vice President
657(1)
News Releases
658(1)
1999 Nobel Peace Prize News Release
659(1)
Brochures
660(2)
Posters and Fliers
662(3)
Poster Rhetoric
665(3)
E-Mail
668(2)
Web-Sites
670(2)
Verbal Communication
672(12)
Speeches
672(2)
``Do We Live in a Democracy?''
674(1)
Mike Ferner
Briefings
675(1)
Press Briefing
676(1)
Briefing Paper: Drug Testing in the Workplace
677(5)
Discussions
682(2)
Visual Communication
684(20)
Visuals: Analyzing an Image
684(1)
Visuals and Text
685(1)
Images in Context
686(1)
Accident and Intent
687(1)
Viewer Interpretation
687(1)
Analyzing and Image
688(1)
Content
688(1)
Framing
689(1)
Composition
689(1)
Focus
690(1)
Lighting
690(1)
Texture
691(1)
Angle and Vantage Point
691(1)
Individual Elements Combined
692(1)
Significance
693(1)
Analyzing an Image
694(1)
Reading Images Together
695(1)
Focusing on Context
695(1)
Crop an Image
695(1)
Create Your Own Word Comic
695(1)
Visuals and Written Text
696(1)
Telling the Truth about Data
697(1)
Visuals Make Arguments
697(1)
Testing a Visual
697(3)
``The Gap Widens''
700(1)
Analysis of ``The Gap Widens'': A Graphic Illustration of ``Entitlement Education''
701(3)
Rhetorical Handbook
704
Where to Find It (Index of Handbook Topics)
706(1)
How Sentences Work: A Look at Basic Grammar
707(1)
How Sentences Work (in Brief)
707(3)
How Sentences Work (Expanded)
710(18)
Organization
728(1)
What Is Organization?
728(1)
Theme Writing
729(1)
Beyond Theme Writing
730(2)
Document Design
732(1)
Sample Document Design (MLA)
733(3)
Writing Style
736(1)
The Circle of Good Writing
737(1)
Problems with Style
738(2)
Paragraphs
740(1)
Supporting Paragraphs
740(2)
Unity, Development, and Coherence
742(1)
Opening and Closing Paragraphs
742(2)
Sentence Vitality
744(1)
Clarity
744(1)
Conciseness
744(1)
Coherence
744(1)
Strategies to Create Clear, Concise, and Coherent Writing
745(5)
Coherence and Conciseness
750(4)
Complete Sentences
754(1)
Identifying, Understanding, and Revising Sentence Fragments and Run-On Sentences
754(2)
Agreement
756(1)
Verb Tense Agreement
756(1)
Shifts in Person
757(1)
Pronoun/Antecedent Agreement
758(2)
Subject/Verb Agreement
760(1)
Parallelism
761(1)
Parallelism with Coordinating Conjunctions
762(1)
Other Parallel Situations: Semicolons, Comparisons/Contrasts, Lists, and Headings
762(2)
Word Choice
764(1)
Accurate
764(1)
Appropriate
765(3)
Punctuation
768(1)
Commas
768(5)
Colons
773(1)
Semicolons
773
Index 1(1)
Credits 1


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