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Computer Networking : A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet,9780201477115
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Computer Networking : A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet

by ;
ISBN13:

9780201477115

ISBN10:
0201477114
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $101.00
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Summary

By starting at the application-layer and working down to the protocol stack, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet provides a motivational treatment of important concepts for networking students. Based on the rationale that once a student understands the applications of networks they can understand the network services needed to support these applications, this book takes a "top-down" approach where students are first exposed to a concrete application and then drawn into some of the deeper issues of networking. Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet focuses on the Internet as opposed to addressing it as just one of many computer network technologies. Students are enormously curious about what is "under the hood" of the Internet, creating an extremely motivational vehicle for teaching fundamental computer networking concepts. This text features a comprehensive companion website which includes the entire text online. It allows for direct access to some of the best Internet sites relating to computer networks and Internet protocols. The website has many interactive features, including direct access to the Traceroute program, direct access to search engines for Internet Drafts, Java applets that animate difficult concepts, and direct streaming audio. Finally, the website makes it possible to update the material to keep up-to-date with this rapidly changing field.

Author Biography

Jim Kurose is Professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst Keith Ross is Chair of the Multimedia Communications Department at Institut Eurecom

Table of Contents

Computer Networks and the Internet
1(71)
What Is the Internet?
1(5)
A Nuts and Bolts Description
1(3)
A Service Description
4(1)
Some Good Hyperlinks
5(1)
What Is a Protocol?
6(3)
A Human Analogy
7(1)
Network Protocols
8(1)
The Network Edge
9(4)
End Systems, Clients, and Servers
9(2)
Connectionless and Connection-Oriented Services
11(2)
The Network Core
13(16)
Circuit Switching, Packet Switching, and Message Switching
13(11)
Routing in Data Networks
24(5)
Access Networks and Physical Media
29(9)
Access Networks
29(5)
Physical Media
34(4)
Delay and Loss in Packet-Switched Networks
38(6)
Types of Delay
38(6)
Protocol Layers and Their Service Models
44(9)
Layered Architecture
45(4)
The Internet Protocol Stack
49(4)
Network Entities and Layers
53(1)
Internet Backbones, NAPs, and ISPs
53(3)
A Brief History of Computer Networking and the Internet
56(6)
Development and Demonstration of Early Packet Switching Principles: 1961--1972
56(1)
Internetworking, and New and Proprietary Networks: 1972--1980
57(3)
A Proliferation of Networks: 1980--1990
60(1)
Commercialization and the Web: The 1990s
61(1)
Summary
62(10)
Homework Problems and Questions
64(2)
Problems
66(2)
Discussion Questions
68(2)
Interview
70(2)
Leonard Kleinrock
Application Layer
72(95)
Principles of Application Layer Protocols
72(12)
Application-Layer Protocols
73(5)
What Services Does an Application Need?
78(2)
Services Provided by the Internet Transport Protocols
80(3)
Network Applications Covered in this Book
83(1)
The World Wide Web: HTTP
84(20)
Overview of HTTP
85(2)
Nonpersistent and Persistent Connections
87(3)
HTTP Message Format
90(4)
User-Server Interaction: Authentication and Cookies
94(2)
The Conditional GET
96(1)
Web Caches
97(7)
File Transfer: FTP
104(2)
FTP Commands and Replies
105(1)
Electronic Mail in the Internet
106(18)
SMTP
109(2)
Comparison with HTTP
111(1)
Mail Message Formats and MIME
112(6)
Mail Access Protocols
118(5)
Continuous Media E-mail
123(1)
DNS---The Internet's Directory Service
124(12)
Services Provided by DNS
124(3)
Overview of How DNS Works
127(5)
DNS Records
132(2)
DNS Messages
134(2)
Socket Programming with TCP
136(10)
Socket Programming with TCP
137(2)
An Example Client/Server Application in Java
139(7)
Socket Programming with UDP
146(8)
Building a Simple Web Server
154(4)
Web Server Functions
154(4)
Summary
158(9)
Homework Problems and Questions
159(2)
Problems
161(1)
Discussion Questions
162(1)
Programming Assignments
163(2)
Interview
165(2)
Tim Berners-Lee
Transport Layer
167(104)
Transport-Layer Services and Principles
167(5)
Relationship between Transport and Network Layers
169(2)
Overview of the Transport Layer in the Internet
171(1)
Multiplexing and Demultiplexing Applications
172(5)
Connectionless Transport: UDP
177(5)
UDP Segment Structure
180(1)
UDP Checksum
181(1)
Principles of Reliable Data Transfer
182(25)
Building a Reliable Data Transfer Protocol
184(9)
Pipelined Reliable Data Transfer Protocols
193(3)
Go-Back-N (GBN)
196(5)
Selective Repeat (SR)
201(6)
Connection-Oriented Transport: TCP
207(24)
The TCP Connection
207(3)
TCP Segment Structure
210(1)
Sequence Numbers and Acknowledgment Numbers
211(2)
Telnet: A Case Study for Sequence and Acknowledgment Numbers
213(2)
Reliable Data Transfer
215(6)
Flow Control
221(3)
Round Trip Time and Timeout
224(2)
TCP Connection Management
226(5)
Principles of Congestion Control
231(9)
The Causes and the Costs of Congestion
231(6)
Approaches toward Congestion Control
237(2)
ATM ABR Congestion Control
239(1)
TCP Congestion Control
240(18)
Overview of TCP Congestion Control
241(8)
Modeling Latency: Static Congestion Window
249(4)
Modeling Latency: Dynamic Congestion Window
253(5)
Summary
258(13)
Homework Problems and Questions
260(1)
Problems
261(7)
Discussion Question
268(1)
Programming Assignment
268(1)
Interview
269(2)
Sally Floyd
Network Layer and Routing
271(108)
Introduction and Network Service Models
271(9)
Network Service Model
273(6)
Origins of Datagram and Virtual Circuit Service
279(1)
Routing Principles
280(17)
A Link State Routing Algorithm
282(4)
A Distance Vector Routing Algorithm
286(9)
Other Routing Algorithms
295(2)
Hierarchical Routing
297(3)
Internet Protocol
300(21)
IPvl Addressing
302(8)
Transporting a Datagram from Source to Destination: Addressing and Routing
310(4)
Datagram Format
314(3)
IP Fragmentation and Reassembly
317(2)
ICMP: Internet Control Message Protocol
319(2)
Routing in the Internet
321(11)
Intra-Autonomous System Routing in the Internet
322(7)
Inter-Autonomous System Routing
329(3)
What's Inside a Router?
332(9)
Input Ports
333(3)
Switching Fabrics
336(2)
Output Ports
338(1)
Where Does Queuing Occur?
338(3)
IPv6
341(7)
IPv6 Packet Format
342(3)
Transitioning from IPv4 to IPv6
345(3)
Multicast Routing
348(19)
Introduction: The Internet Multicast Abstraction and Multicast Groups
348(2)
The IGMP Protocol
350(5)
Multicast Routing: The General Case
355(7)
Multicast Routing in the Internet
362(5)
Summary
367(12)
Homework Problems and Questions
368(2)
Problems
370(4)
Discussion Questions
374(1)
Programming Assignment
375(2)
Interview
377(2)
Jose Joaquin Garcia-Luna-Aceves
Link Layer and Local Area Networks
379(104)
The Data Link Layer: Introduction, Services
379(6)
The Services Provided by the Link Layer
380(3)
Adapters Communicating
383(2)
Error Detection and Correction Techniques
385(6)
Parity Checks
386(3)
Checksumming Methods
389(1)
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC)
389(2)
Multiple Access Protocols and LANs
391(18)
Channel Partitioning Protocols
394(4)
Random Access protocols
398(8)
Taking-Turns Protocols
406(1)
Local Area Networks (LANs)
407(2)
LAN Addresses and ARP
409(6)
LAN Addresses
409(2)
Address Resolution Protocol
411(4)
Ethernet
415(12)
Ethernet Basics
417(4)
CSMA/CD: Ethernet's Multiple Access Protocol
421(2)
Ethernet Technologies
423(4)
Hubs, Bridges, and Switches
427(14)
Hubs
427(2)
Bridges
429(8)
Switches
437(4)
IEEE 802.11 LANs
441(6)
802.11 LAN Architecture
441(1)
802.11 Media Access Protocols
442(5)
PPP: The Point-to-Point Protocol
447(6)
PPP Data Framing
449(2)
PPP Link Control Protocol (LCP) and Network Control Protocols
451(2)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
453(12)
Principle Characteristics of ATM
454(2)
ATM Physical Layer
456(2)
ATM Layer
458(1)
ATM Adaptation Layer
459(2)
IP Over ATM
461(3)
ARP and ATM
464(1)
X.25 and Frame Relay
465(6)
A Few Words About X.25
466(1)
Frame Relay
467(4)
Summary
471(12)
Homework Problems and Questions
472(2)
Problems
474(6)
Discussion Questions
480(1)
Interview
481(2)
Robert Metcalfe
Multimedia Networking
483(82)
Multimedia Networking Applications
484(7)
Examples of Multimedia Applications
484(3)
Hurdles for Multimedia in Today's Internet
487(1)
How Should the Internet Evolve to Better Support Multimedia?
488(1)
Audio and Video Compression
489(2)
Streaming Stored Audio and Video
491(10)
Accessing Audio and Video from a Web Server
493(2)
Sending Multimedia from a Streaming Server to a Helper Application
495(2)
Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP)
497(4)
Making the Best of the Best-Effort Service: An Internet Phone Example
501(9)
The Limitations of a Best-Effort Service
501(2)
Removing Jitter at the Receiver for Audio
503(3)
Recovering from Packet Loss
506(4)
Streaming Stored Audio and Video
510(1)
RTP
510(12)
RTP Basics
510(3)
RTP Packet Header Fields
513(1)
RTP Control Protocol (RTCP)
514(3)
H.323
517(5)
Beyond Best-Effort
522(6)
A 1 Mbps Audio Application and an FTP Transfer
523(1)
A 1 Mbps Audio Application and a High Priority FTP Transfer
524(1)
A Misbehaving Audio Application and an FTP Transfer
525(1)
Two 1 Mbps Audio Applications Over an Overloaded 1.5 Mbps Link
526(2)
Scheduling and Policing Mechanisms
528(8)
Scheduling Mechanisms
528(5)
Policing: The Leaky Bucket
533(3)
Integrated Services
536(3)
Guaranteed Quality of Service
538(1)
Controlled-Load Network Service
539(1)
RSVP
539(10)
The Essence of RSVP
540(2)
A Few Simple Examples
542(2)
Path Messages
544(1)
Reservation Styles
544(4)
Transport of Reservation Messages
548(1)
Differentiated Services
549(7)
Differentiated Services: A Simple Scenario
550(2)
Traffic Classification and Conditioning
552(2)
Per-Hop Behavior
554(2)
A Beginning
556(1)
Summary
556(9)
Homework Problems and Questions
558(1)
Problems
559(2)
Discussion Questions
561(2)
Interview
563(2)
Henning Schulzrinne
Security in Computer Networks
565(61)
What is Network Security?
565(4)
Secure Communication
565(2)
Network Security Considerations in the Internet
567(2)
Principles of Cryptography
569(12)
Symmetric Key Cryptography
571(4)
Public Key Encryption
575(6)
Authentication: Who are You?
581(7)
Authentication Protocol ap1.0
581(1)
Authentication Protocol ap2.0
582(1)
Authentication Protocol ap3.0
583(1)
Authentication Protocol ap3.1
583(1)
Authentication Protocol ap4.0
584(2)
Authentication Protocol ap5.0
586(2)
Integrity
588(7)
Generating Digital Signatures
589(1)
Message Digests
590(3)
Hash Function Algorithms
593(2)
Key Distribution and Certification
595(7)
The Key Distribution Center
595(3)
Public Key Certification
598(4)
Secure E-Mail
602(6)
Principles of Secure E-Mail
603(2)
PGP
605(3)
Internet Commerce
608(8)
Internet Commerce Using SSL
609(4)
Internet Commerce Using SET
613(3)
Network Layer Security: IPsec
616(4)
Authentication Header (AH) Protocol
617(1)
The ESP Protocol
618(1)
SA and Key Management
619(1)
Summary
620(6)
Homework Problems and Questions
621(1)
Problems
622(1)
Discussion Questions
623(1)
Interview
624(2)
Philip Zimmermann
Network Management
626(37)
What Is Network Management?
626(5)
The Infrastructure for Network Management
631(3)
The Internet Network-Management Framework
634(14)
Structure of Management Information: SMI
635(3)
Management Information Base: MIB
638(3)
SNMP Protocol Operations and Transport Mappings
641(3)
Security and Administration
644(4)
ASN.1
648(5)
Firewalls
653(4)
Packet Filtering
654(1)
Application Gateways
655(2)
Summary
657(6)
Homework Problems and Questions
658(1)
Problems
659(1)
Discussion Questions
659(1)
Interview
660(3)
Jeff Case
References 663(26)
Index 689


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