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Computer Networks,9780133499452
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Computer Networks

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780133499452

ISBN10:
0133499456
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/1996
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall PTR

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Summary

Primarily intended for junior/senior or graduate level courses in computer networks, data networks, or distributed processing in CS or EE departments. Also useful (with selective omission of sections or chapters) for less advanced students. This is the first book that explains how computer networks work inside, from the hardware technology up to and including the most popular Internet application protocols. While students are not expected to have a background in computer networks or advanced mathematics, a general background in computer systems and programming is assumed.

Table of Contents

PREFACE XV
1 INTRODUCTION
1(76)
1.1 USES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS
3(4)
1.1.1 Networks for Companies
3(1)
1.1.2 Networks for People
4(2)
1.1.3 Social Issues
6(1)
1.2 NETWORK HARDWARE
7(9)
1.2.1 Local Area Networks
9(1)
1.2.2 Metropolitan Area Networks
10(1)
1.2.3 Wide Area Networks
11(2)
1.2.4 Wireless Networks
13(3)
1.2.5 Internetworks
16(1)
1.3 NETWORK SOFTWARE
16(12)
1.3.1 Protocol Hierarchies
17(4)
1.3.2 Design Issues for the Layers
21(1)
1.3.3 Interfaces and Services
22(1)
1.3.4 Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Services
23(2)
1.3.5 Service Primitives
25(2)
1.3.6 The Relationship of Services to Protocols
27(1)
1.4 REFERENCE MODELS
28(16)
1.4.1 The OSI Reference Model
28(7)
1.4.2 The TCP/IP Reference Model
35(3)
1.4.3 A Comparison of the OSI and TCP Reference Models
38(2)
1.4.4 A Critique of the OSI Model and Protocols
40(3)
1.4.5 A Critique of the TCP/IP Reference Model
43(1)
1.5 EXAMPLE NETWORKS
44(12)
1.5.1 Novell NetWare
45(2)
1.5.2 The ARPANET
47(3)
1.5.3 NSFNET
50(2)
1.5.4 The Internet
52(2)
1.5.5 Gigabit Testbeds
54(2)
1.6 EXAMPLE DATA COMMUNICATION SERVICES
56(10)
1.6.1 SMDS--Switched Multimegabit Data Service
57(2)
1.6.2 X.25 Networks
59(1)
1.6.3 Frame Relay
60(1)
1.6.4 Broadband ISDN and ATM
61(5)
1.6.5 Comparison of Services
66(1)
1.7 NETWORK STANDARDIZATION
66(6)
1.7.1 Who's Who in the Telecommunications World
67(2)
1.7.2 Who's Who in the International Standards World
69(1)
1.7.3 Who's Who in the Internet Standards World
70(2)
1.8 OUTLINE OF THE REST OF THE BOOK
72(1)
1.9 SUMMARY
73(4)
2 THE PHYSICAL LAYER
77(98)
2.1 THE THEORETICAL BASIS FOR DATA COMMUNICATION
77(5)
2.1.1 Fourier Analysis
78(1)
2.1.2 Bandwidth-Limited Signals
78(3)
2.1.3 The Maximum Data Rate of a Channel
81(1)
2.2 TRANSMISSION MEDIA
82(12)
2.2.1 Magnetic Media
82(1)
2.2.2 Twisted Pair
83(1)
2.2.3 Baseband Coaxial Cable
84(1)
2.2.4 Broadband Coaxial Cable
85(2)
2.2.5 Fiber Optics
87(7)
2.3 WIRELESS TRANSMISSION
94(8)
2.3.1 The Electromagnetic Spectrum
94(3)
2.3.2 Radio Transmission
97(1)
2.3.3 Microwave Transmission
98(2)
2.3.4 Infrared and Millimeter Waves
100(1)
2.3.5 Lightwave Transmission
100(2)
2.4 THE TELEPHONE SYSTEM
102(37)
2.4.1 Structure of the Telephone System
103(3)
2.4.2 The Politics of Telephones
106(2)
2.4.3 The Local Loop
108(10)
2.4.4 Trunks and Multiplexing
118(12)
2.4.5 Switching
130(9)
2.5 NARROWBAND ISDN
139(5)
2.5.1 ISDN Services
140(1)
2.5.2 ISDN System Architecture
140(2)
2.5.3 The ISDN Interface
142(1)
2.5.4 Perspective on N-ISDN
143(1)
2.6 BROADBAND ISDN AND ATM
144(11)
2.6.1 Virtual Circuits versus Circuit Switching
145(1)
2.6.2 Transmission in ATM Networks
146(1)
2.6.3 ATM Switches
147(8)
2.7 CELLULAR RADIO
155(8)
2.7.1 Paging Systems
155(2)
2.7.2 Cordless Telephones
157(1)
2.7.3 Analog Cellular Telephones
157(5)
2.7.4 Digital Cellular Telephones
162(1)
2.7.5 Personal Communications Services
162(1)
2.8 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES
163(7)
2.8.1 Geosynchronous Satellites
164(3)
2.8.2 Low-Orbit Satellites
167(1)
2.8.3 Satellites versus Fiber
168(2)
2.9 SUMMARY
170(5)
3 THE DATA LINK LAYER
175(68)
3.1 DATA LINK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES
176(7)
3.1.1 Services Provided to the Network Layer
176(3)
3.1.2 Framing
179(3)
3.1.3 Error Control
182(1)
3.1.4 Flow Control
183(1)
3.2 ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION
183(7)
3.2.1 Error-Correcting Codes
184(2)
3.2.2 Error-Detecting Codes
186(4)
3.3 ELEMENTARY DATA LINK PROTOCOLS
190(12)
3.3.1 An Unrestricted Simplex Protocol
195(1)
3.3.2 A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol
195(2)
3.3.3 A Simplex Protocol for a Noisy Channel
197(5)
3.4 SLIDING WINDOW PROTOCOLS
202(17)
3.4.1 A One Bit Sliding Window Protocol
206(1)
3.4.2 A Protocol Using Go Back n
207(6)
3.4.3 A Protocol Using Selective Repeat
213(6)
3.5 PROTOCOL SPECIFICATION AND VERIFICATION
219(6)
3.5.1 Finite State Machine Models
219(4)
3.5.2 Petri Net Models
223(2)
3.6 EXAMPLE DATA LINK PROTOCOLS
225(14)
3.6.1 HDLC--High-level Data Link Control
225(4)
3.6.2 The Data Link Layer in the Internet
229(6)
3.6.3 The Data Link Layer in ATM
235(4)
3.7 SUMMARY
239(4)
4 THE MEDIUM ACCESS SUBLAYER
243(96)
4.1 THE CHANNEL ALLOCATION PROBLEM
244(2)
4.1.1 Static Channel Allocation in LANs and MANs
244(1)
4.1.2 Dynamic Channel Allocation in LANs and MANs
245(1)
4.2 MULTIPLE ACCESS PROTOCOLS
246(29)
4.2.1 ALOHA
246(4)
4.2.2 Carrier Sense Multiple Access Protocols
250(4)
4.2.3 Collision-Free Protocols
254(2)
4.2.4 Limited-Contention Protocols
256(4)
4.2.5 Wavelength Division Multiple Access Protocols
260(2)
4.2.6 Wireless LAN Protocols
262(4)
4.2.7 Digital Cellular Radio
266(9)
4.3 IEEE STANDARD 802 FOR LANS AND MANS
275(29)
4.3.1 IEEE Standard 802.3 and Ethernet
276(11)
4.3.2 IEEE Standard 802.4: Token Bus
287(5)
4.3.3 IEEE Standard 802.5: Token Ring
292(7)
4.3.4 Comparison of 802.3, 802.4, and 802.5
299(2)
4.3.5 IEEE Standard 802.6: Distributed Queue Dual Bus
301(1)
4.3.6 IEEE Standard 802.2: Logical Link Control
302(2)
4.4 BRIDGES
304(14)
4.4.1 Bridges from 802.x to 802.y
307(3)
4.4.2 Transparent Bridges
310(4)
4.4.3 Source Routing Bridges
314(2)
4.4.4 Comparison of 802 Bridges
316(1)
4.4.5 Remote Bridges
317(1)
4.5 HIGH-SPEED LANS
318(9)
4.5.1 FDDI
319(3)
4.5.2 Fast Ethernet
322(3)
4.5.3 HIPPI--High-Performance Parallel Interface
325(1)
4.5.4 Fibre Channel
326(1)
4.6 SATELLITE NETWORKS
327(6)
4.6.1 Polling
328(1)
4.6.2 ALOHA
329(1)
4.6.3 FDM
330(1)
4.6.4 TDM
330(3)
4.6.5 CDMA
333(1)
4.7 SUMMARY
333(6)
5 THE NETWORK LAYER
339(140)
5.1 NETWORK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES
339(6)
5.1.1 Services Provided to the Transport Layer
340(2)
5.1.2 Internal Organization of the Network Layer
342(2)
5.1.3 Comparison of Virtual Circuit and Datagram Subnets
344(1)
5.2 ROUTING ALGORITHMS
345(29)
5.2.1 The Optimality Principle
347(2)
5.2.2 Shortest Path Routing
349(2)
5.2.3 Flooding
351(2)
5.2.4 Flow-Based Routing
353(2)
5.2.5 Distance Vector Routing
355(4)
5.2.6 Link State Routing
359(6)
5.2.7 Hierarchical Routing
365(2)
5.2.8 Routing for Mobile Hosts
367(3)
5.2.9 Broadcast Routing
370(2)
5.2.10 Multicast Routing
372(2)
5.3 CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS
374(22)
5.3.1 General Principles of Congestion Control
376(2)
5.3.2 Congestion Prevention Policies
378(1)
5.3.3 Traffic Shaping
379(5)
5.3.4 Flow Specifications
384(2)
5.3.5 Congestion Control in Virtual Circuit Subnets
386(1)
5.3.6 Choke Packets
387(3)
5.3.7 Load Shedding
390(2)
5.3.8 Jitter Control
392(1)
5.3.9 Congestion Control for Multicasting
393(3)
5.4 INTERNETWORKING
396(16)
5.4.1 How Networks Differ
399(2)
5.4.2 Concatenated Virtual Circuits
401(1)
5.4.3 Connectionless Internetworking
402(2)
5.4.4 Tunneling
404(1)
5.4.5 Internetwork Routing
405(1)
5.4.6 Fragmentation
406(4)
5.4.7 Firewalls
410(2)
5.5 THE NETWORK LAYER IN THE INTERNET
412(37)
5.5.1 The IP Protocol
413(3)
5.5.2 IP Addresses
416(1)
5.5.3 Subnets
417(2)
5.5.4 Internet Control Protocols
419(5)
5.5.5 The Interior Gateway Routing Protocol: OSPF
424(5)
5.5.6 The Exterior Gateway Routing Protocol: BGP
429(2)
5.5.7 Internet Multicasting
431(1)
5.5.8 Mobile IP
432(2)
5.5.9 CIDR--Classless InterDomain Routing
434(3)
5.5.10 IPv6
437(12)
5.6 THE NETWORK LAYER IN ATM NETWORKS
449(24)
5.6.1 Cell Formats
450(2)
5.6.2 Connection Setup
452(3)
5.6.3 Routing and Switching
455(3)
5.6.4 Service Categories
458(2)
5.6.5 Quality of Service
460(3)
5.6.6 Traffic Shaping and Policing
463(4)
5.6.7 Congestion Control
467(4)
5.6.8 ATM LANs
471(2)
5.7 SUMMARY
473(6)
6 THE TRANSPORT LAYER
479(98)
6.1 THE TRANSPORT SERVICE
479(9)
6.1.1 Services Provided to the Upper Layers
479(2)
6.1.2 Quality of Service
481(2)
6.1.3 Transport Service Primitives
483(5)
6.2 ELEMENTS OF TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS
488(22)
6.2.1 Addressing
489(4)
6.2.2 Establishing a Connection
493(5)
6.2.3 Releasing a Connection
498(4)
6.2.4 Flow Control and Buffering
502(4)
6.2.5 Multiplexing
506(2)
6.2.6 Crash Recovery
508(2)
6.3 A SIMPLE TRANSPORT PROTOCOL
510(11)
6.3.1 The Example Service Primitives
510(2)
6.3.2 The Example Transport Entity
512(7)
6.3.3 The Example as a Finite State Machine
519(2)
6.4 THE INTERNET TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS (TCP AND UDP)
521(24)
6.4.1 The TCP Service Model
523(1)
6.4.2 The TCP Protocol
524(2)
6.4.3 The TCP Segment Header
526(3)
6.4.4 TCP Connection Management
529(4)
6.4.5 TCP Transmission Policy
533(3)
6.4.6 TCP Congestion Control
536(3)
6.4.7 TCP Timer Management
539(3)
6.4.8 UDP
542(1)
6.4.9 Wireless TCP and UDP
543(2)
6.5 THE ATM AAL LAYER PROTOCOLS
545(10)
6.5.1 Structure of the ATM Adaptation Layer
546(1)
6.5.2 AAL 1
547(2)
6.5.3 AAL 2
549(1)
6.5.4 AAL 3/4
550(2)
6.5.5 AAL 5
552(2)
6.5.6 Comparison of AAL Protocols
554(1)
6.5.7 SSCOP--Service Specific Connection-Oriented Protocol
555(1)
6.6 PERFORMANCE ISSUES
555(17)
6.6.1 Performance Problems in Computer Networks
556(3)
6.6.2 Measuring Network Performance
559(2)
6.6.3 System Design for Better Performance
561(4)
6.6.4 Fast TPDU Processing
565(3)
6.6.5 Protocols for Gigabit Networks
568(4)
6.7 SUMMARY
572(5)
7 THE APPLICATION LAYER
577(190)
7.1 NETWORK SECURITY
577(45)
7.1.1 Traditional Cryptography
580(5)
7.1.2 Two Fundamental Cryptographic Principles
585(2)
7.1.3 Secret-Key Algorithms
587(10)
7.1.4 Public-Key Algorithms
597(4)
7.1.5 Authentication Protocols
601(12)
7.1.6 Digital Signatures
613(7)
7.1.7 Social Issues
620(2)
7.2 DNS--DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM
622(8)
7.2.1 The DNS Name Space
622(2)
7.2.2 Resource Records
624(4)
7.2.3 Name Servers
628(2)
7.3 SNMP--SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
630(13)
7.3.1 The SNMP Model
631(2)
7.3.2 ASN.1--Abstract Syntax Notation 1
633(6)
7.3.3 SMI--Structure of Management Information
639(2)
7.3.4 The MIB--Management Information Base
641(1)
7.3.5 The SNMP Protocol
642(1)
7.4 ELECTRONIC MAIL
643(26)
7.4.1 Architecture and Services
645(1)
7.4.2 The User Agent
646(4)
7.4.3 Message Formats
650(7)
7.4.4 Message Transfer
657(6)
7.4.5 Email Privacy
663(6)
7.5 USENET NEWS
669(12)
7.5.1 The User View of USENET
670(5)
7.5.2 How USENET is Implemented
675(6)
7.6 THE WORLD WIDE WEB
681(42)
7.6.1 The Client Side
682(3)
7.6.2 The Server Side
685(6)
7.6.3 Writing a Web Page in HTML
691(15)
7.6.4 Java
706(14)
7.6.5 Locating Information on the Web
720(3)
7.7 MULTIMEDIA
723(37)
7.7.1 Audio
724(3)
7.7.2 Video
727(3)
7.7.3 Data Compression
730(14)
7.7.4 Video on Demand
744(12)
7.7.5 MBone--Multicast Backbone
756(4)
7.8 SUMMARY
760(7)
8 READING LIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
767(28)
8.1 SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
767(8)
8.1.1 Introduction and General Works
768(1)
8.1.2 The Physical Layer
769(1)
8.1.3 The Data Link Layer
770(1)
8.1.4 The Medium Access Control Sublayer
770(1)
8.1.5 The Network Layer
771(1)
8.1.6 The Transport Layer
772(1)
8.1.7 The Application Layer
772(3)
8.2 ALPHABETICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
775(20)
INDEX 795


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