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Computer Networks

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780132126953

ISBN10:
0132126958
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
9/27/2010
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $156.40

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Summary

Computer Networks, 5/e is appropriate for Computer Networking or Introduction to Networking courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, CIS, MIS, and Business Departments.

Tanenbaum takes a structured approach to explaining how networks work from the inside out. He starts with an explanation of the physical layer of networking, computer hardware and transmission systems; then works his way up to network applications. Tanenbaum's in-depth application coverage includes email; the domain name system; the World Wide Web (both client- and server-side); and multimedia (including voice over IP, Internet radio video on demand, video conferencing, and streaming media. Each chapter follows a consistent approach: Tanenbaum presents key principles, then illustrates them utilizing real-world example networks that run through the entire book—the Internet, and wireless networks, including Wireless LANs, broadband wireless and Bluetooth. The Fifth Edition includes a chapter devoted exclusively to network security. The textbook is supplemented by a Solutions Manual, as well as a Website containing PowerPoint slides, art in various forms, and other tools for instruction, including a protocol simulator whereby students can develop and test their own network protocols.

Author Biography

Andrew S. Tanenbaum is a Professor of Computer Science at Vrije Universiteteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He is a fellow of IEEE and ACM and a member of the Netherlands Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences. He recently won a prestigious European Research Council Advanced Grant of 2.5 million to do research on highly reliable computer systems. Tanenbaum has also authored or coauthored the following titles: Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition; Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, Third Edition; and Distributed Systems: Principles and Paradigms, Second Edition, all published by Prentice Hall.

David J. Wetherall is a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He hails from Australia and has worked in the area of networking for the past two decades. His research is focused on Internet protocols, wireless networks, and security. Wetherall's work has been recognized with a Sloan Fellowship, the IEEE Bennett Prize, and the ACM SIGCOMM Test-of-Time Award.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1  INTRODUCTION

1.1  USES OF COMPUTER NETWORKS

1.1.1  Business Applications

1.1.2  Home Applications

1.1.3  Mobile Users

1.1.4  Social Issues

1.2  NETWORK HARDWARE

1.2.1  Personal Area Networks

1.2.2  Local Area Networks

1.2.3  Metropolitan Area Networks

+1.2.4  Wide Area Networks

1.2.5  Internetworks

1.3  NETWORK SOFTWARE

1.3.1  Protocol Hierarchies

1.3.2  Design Issues for the Layers

1.3.3  Connection-Oriented Versus Connectionless Service

1.3.4  Service Primitives

1.3.5  The Relationship of Services to Protocols

1.4  REFERENCE MODELS

1.4.1  The OSI Reference Model

1.4.2  The TCP/IP Reference Model

1.4.3  The Model Used in this Book

**1.4.4  A Comparison of the OSI and TCP/IP Reference Models

**1.4.5  A Critique of the OSI Model and Protocols

**1.4.6  A Critique of the TCP/IP Reference Model

1.5  EXAMPLE NETWORKS

+1.5.1  The Internet

+**1.5.2  Third-Generation Mobile Phone Networks

+**1.5.3  Wireless LANs: 802.11

++**1.5.4  RFID and Sensor Networks

**1.6  NETWORK STANDARDIZATION

**1.6.1  Who's Who in the Telecommunications World

**1.6.2  Who's Who in the International Standards World

**1.6.3  Who's Who in the Internet Standards World

1.7  METRIC UNITS

1.8  OUTLINE OF THE REST OF THE BOOK

1.9  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 2  THE PHYSICAL LAYER

2.1  THE THEORETICAL BASIS FOR DATA COMMUNICATION

2.1.1  Fourier Analysis

2.1.2  Bandwidth-Limited Signals

2.1.3  The Maximum Data Rate of a Channel

2.2  GUIDED TRANSMISSION MEDIA

2.2.1  Magnetic Media

2.2.2  Twisted Pairs

2.2.3  Coaxial Cable

++2.2.4  Power Lines

2.2.5  Fiber Optics

2.3  WIRELESS TRANSMISSION

+2.3.1  The Electromagnetic Spectrum

2.3.2  Radio Transmission

+2.3.3  Microwave Transmission

+**2.3.4  Infrared Transmission

+**2.3.5  Light Transmission

**2.4  COMMUNICATION SATELLITES

**2.4.1  Geostationary Satellites

**2.4.2  Medium-Earth Orbit Satellites

**2.4.3  Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

**2.4.4  Satellites Versus Fiber

2.5  DIGITAL MODULATION AND MULTIPLEXING

++2.5.1  Baseband Transmission

++2.5.2  Passband Transmission

+2.5.3  Frequency Division Multiplexing

2.5.4  Time Division Multiplexing

+2.5.5  Code Division Multiplexing

2.6  THE PUBLIC SWITCHED TELEPHONE NETWORK

2.6.1  Structure of the Telephone System

2.6.2  The Politics of Telephones

+2.6.3  The Local Loop: Modems, ADSL, and Fiber

2.6.4  Trunks and Multiplexing

2.6.5  Switching

**2.7  THE MOBILE TELEPHONE SYSTEM

**2.7.1  First-Generation (1G) Mobile Phones: Analog Voice

**2.7.2  Second-Generation (2G) Mobile Phones: Digital Voice

+**2.7.3  Third-Generation (3G) Mobile Phones: Digital Voice and Data

**2.8  CABLE TELEVISION

**2.8.1  Community Antenna Television

**2.8.2  Internet over Cable

**2.8.3  Spectrum Allocation

**2.8.4  Cable Modems

**2.8.5  ADSL Versus Cable

2.9  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 3  THE DATA LINK LAYER

3.1  DATA LINK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES

3.1.1  Services Provided to the Network Layer

3.1.2  Framing

3.1.3  Error Control

3.1.4  Flow Control

+3.2  ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION

+3.2.1  Error-Correcting Codes

+3.2.2  Error-Detecting Codes

3.3  ELEMENTARY DATA LINK PROTOCOLS

3.3.1  A Utopian Simplex Protocol

3.3.2  A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol for an Error-Free Channel

3.3.3  A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol for a Noisy Channel

3.4  SLIDING WINDOW PROTOCOLS

3.4.1  A One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol

3.4.2  A Protocol Using Go-Back-N

3.4.3  A Protocol Using Selective Repeat

3.5  EXAMPLE DATA LINK PROTOCOLS

++3.5.1  Packet over SONET

++3.5.2  ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Loop)

3.6  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 4  THE MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL SUBLAYER

4.1  THE CHANNEL ALLOCATION PROBLEM

4.1.1  Static Channel Allocation

4.1.2  Assumptions for Dynamic Channel Allocation

4.2  MULTIPLE ACCESS PROTOCOLS

4.2.1  ALOHA

4.2.2  Carrier Sense Multiple Access Protocols

+4.2.3  Collision-Free Protocols

4.2.4  Limited-Contention Protocols

4.2.5  Wireless LAN Protocols

4.3  ETHERNET

4.3.1  Classic Ethernet Physical Layer

4.3.2  Classic Ethernet MAC Sublayer Protocol

4.3.3  Ethernet Performance

4.3.4  Switched Ethernet

4.3.5  Fast Ethernet

+4.3.6  Gigabit Ethernet

+4.3.7  10 Gigabit Ethernet

4.3.8  Retrospective on Ethernet

4.4  WIRELESS LANS

4.4.1  The 802.11 Architecture and Protocol Stack

+4.4.2  The 802.11 Physical Layer

+4.4.3  The 802.11 MAC Sublayer Protocol

4.4.4  The 802.11 Frame Structure

4.4.5  Services

+**4.5  BROADBAND WIRELESS

+**4.5.1  Comparison of 802.16 with 802.11 and 3G

+**4.5.2  The 802.16 Architecture and Protocol Stack

+**4.5.3  The 802.16 Physical Layer

+**4.5.4  The 802.16 MAC Sublayer Protocol

+**4.5.5  The 802.16 Frame Structure

**4.6  BLUETOOTH

**4.6.1  Bluetooth Architecture

**4.6.2  Bluetooth Applications

**4.6.3  The Bluetooth Protocol Stack

**4.6.4  The Bluetooth Radio Layer

**4.6.5  The Bluetooth Link Layers

**4.6.6  The Bluetooth Frame Structure

++**4.7  RFID

++**4.7.1  EPC Gen 2 Architecture

++**4.7.2  EPC Gen 2 Physical Layer

++**4.7.3  EPC Gen 2 Tag Identification Layer

++**4.7.4  Tag Identification Message Formats

4.8  DATA LINK LAYER SWITCHING

4.8.1  Uses of Bridges

+4.8.2  Learning Bridges

+4.8.3  Spanning Tree Bridges

4.8.4  Repeaters, Hubs, Bridges, Switches, Routers, and Gateways

+4.8.5  Virtual LANs

4.9  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 5  THE NETWORK LAYER

5.1  NETWORK LAYER DESIGN ISSUES

5.1.1  Store-and-Forward Packet Switching

5.1.2  Services Provided to the Transport Layer

5.1.3  Implementation of Connectionless Service

5.1.4  Implementation of Connection-Oriented Service

5.1.5  Comparison of Virtual-Circuit and Datagram Networks

5.2  ROUTING ALGORITHMS

5.2.1  The Optimality Principle

5.2.2  Shortest Path Algorithm

5.2.3  Flooding

5.2.4  Distance Vector Routing

5.2.5  Link State Routing

5.2.6  Hierarchical Routing

5.2.7  Broadcast Routing

+5.2.8  Multicast Routing

++**5.2.9  Anycast Routing

5.2.10  Routing for Mobile Hosts

**5.2.11  Routing in Ad Hoc Networks

5.3  CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS

5.3.1  Approaches to Congestion Control

5.3.2  Traffic-Aware Routing

5.3.3  Admission Control

5.3.4  Traffic Throttling

+5.3.5  Load Shedding

5.4  QUALITY OF SERVICE

5.4.1  Application Requirements

+5.4.2  Traffic Shaping

+5.4.3  Packet Scheduling

+5.4.4  Admission Control

5.4.5  Integrated Services

5.4.6  Differentiated Services

5.5  INTERNETWORKING

5.5.1  How Networks Differ

5.5.2  How Networks Can Be Connected

+5.5.3  Tunneling

+5.5.4  Internetwork Routing

+5.5.5  Packet Fragmentation

5.6  THE NETWORK LAYER IN THE INTERNET

5.6.1  The IP Version 4 Protocol

+5.6.2  IP Addresses

**5.6.3  IP Version 6

+5.6.4  Internet Control Protocols

5.6.5  Label Switching and MPLS

+5.6.6  OSPF--An Interior Gateway Routing Protocol

+5.6.7  BGP--The Exterior Gateway Routing Protocol

**5.6.8  Internet Multicasting

**5.6.9  Mobile IP

5.7  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 6  THE TRANSPORT LAYER

6.1  THE TRANSPORT SERVICE

6.1.1  Services Provided to the Upper Layers

6.1.2  Transport Service Primitives

6.1.3  Berkeley Sockets

6.1.4  An Example of Socket Programming: An Internet File Server

6.2  ELEMENTS OF TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS

6.2.1  Addressing

6.2.2.  Connection Establishment

6.2.3  Connection Release

6.2.4  Flow Control and Buffering

6.2.5  Multiplexing

6.2.6  Crash Recovery

++6.3  CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS

++6.3.1  Desirable Bandwidth Allocation

++6.3.2  Regulating the Sending Rate

++6.3.3  Wireless Issues

6.4  THE INTERNET TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS: UDP

6.4.1 Introduction to UDP

**6.4.2  Remote Procedure Call

+6.4.3  The Real-Time Transport Protocol

6.5  THE INTERNET TRANSPORT PROTOCOLS: TCP

6.5.1  Introduction to TCP

6.5.2  The TCP Service Model

6.5.3  The TCP Protocol

6.5.4  The TCP Segment Header

6.5.5  TCP Connection Establishment

6.5.6  TCP Connection Release

6.5.7  TCP Connection Management Modeling

6.5.8  TCP Transmission Policy

6.5.9  TCP Timer Management

++6.5.10  TCP Congestion Control

++6.5.11 The Future of TCP

**6.6  PERFORMANCE ISSUES

**6.6.1  Performance Problems in Computer Networks

**6.6.2  Network Performance Measurement

**6.6.3  Host Design for Fast Networks

**6.6.4  Fast Segment Processing

++**6.6.5  Header Compression

**6.6.6  Protocols for Long Fat Networks

++**6.7  DELAY TOLERANT NETWORKS

++**6.7.1  DTN Architecture

++**6.7.2  The Bundle Protocol

6.8  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 7  THE APPLICATION LAYER

7.1  DNS--THE DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM

7.1.2  The DNS Name Space

7.1.3  Resource Records

7.1.4  Name Servers

+**7.2  ELECTRONIC MAIL

+**7.2.1  Architecture and Services

+**7.2.2  The User Agent

**7.2.3  Message Formats

+**7.2.4  Message Transfer

+**7.2.5  Final Delivery

+7.3  THE WORLD WIDE WEB

+7.3.1  Architectural Overview

+7.3.2  Static Web Pages

+7.3.3  Dynamic Web Pages and Web Applications

+7.3.4  HTTP--The HyperText Transfer Protocol

+**7.3.5  Mobile Web

++**7.3.6  Web Search

7.4  REALTIME AUDIO AND VIDEO

7.4.1  Introduction to Digital Audio

7.4.2  Audio Compression

7.4.3  Streaming Audio

7.4.4  Internet Radio

7.4.5  Voice over IP

7.4.6  Introduction to Video

7.4.7  Video Compression

7.4.8  Video on Demand

++7.5  CONTENT DELIVERY AND PEER-TO-PEER

++7.5.1  Server Replication

++7.5.2  Content Delivery Networks

++7.5.3  Peer-to-Peer Networks

++7.5.4  Overlay Networks

7.5  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 8  NETWORK SECURITY

8.1  CRYPTOGRAPHY

8.1.1  Introduction to Cryptography

8.1.2  Substitution Ciphers

8.1.3  Transposition Ciphers

8.1.4  One-Time Pads

8.1.5  Two Fundamental Cryptographic Principles

8.2  SYMMETRIC-KEY ALGORITHMS

8.2.1  DES--The Data Encryption Standard

8.2.2  AES--The Advanced Encryption Standard

8.2.3  Cipher Modes

8.2.4  Other Ciphers

8.2.5  Cryptanalysis

8.3  PUBLIC-KEY ALGORITHMS

8.3.1  RSA

8.3.2  Other Public-Key Algorithms

8.4  DIGITAL SIGNATURES

8.4.1  Symmetric-Key Signatures

8.4.2  Public-Key Signatures

8.4.3  Message Digests

8.4.4  The Birthday Attack

8.5  MANAGEMENT OF PUBLIC KEYS

8.5.1  Certificates

8.5.2  X.509

8.5.3  Public Key Infrastructures

8.6  COMMUNICATION SECURITY

8.6.1  IPsec

+8.6.2  Firewalls

+8.6.3  Virtual Private Networks

+8.6.4  Wireless Security

8.7  AUTHENTICATION PROTOCOLS

8.7.1  Authentication Based on a Shared Secret Key

**8.7.2  Establishing a Shared Key: The Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange

**8.7.3  Authentication Using a Key Distribution Center

+**8.7.4  Authentication Using Kerberos

8.7.5  Authentication Using Public-Key Cryptography

**8.8  EMAIL SECURITY

**8.8.1  PGP--Pretty Good Privacy

**8.8.2  S/MIME

8.9  WEB SECURITY

8.9.1  Threats

8.9.2  Secure Naming

8.9.3  SSL--The Secure Sockets Layer

+8.9.4  Mobile Code Security

8.10  SOCIAL ISSUES

8.10.1  Privacy

8.10.2  Freedom of Speech

8.10.3  Copyright

8.11  SUMMARY

 

CHAPTER 9  READING LIST AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

**9.1  SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING

**9.1.1  Introduction and General Works

**9.1.2  The Physical Layer

**9.1.3  The Data Link Layer

**9.1.4  The Medium Access Control Sublayer

**9.1.5  The Network Layer

**9.1.6  The Transport Layer

**9.1.7  The Application Layer

**9.1.8  Network Security

++9.2  ALPHABETICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

 




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