9780761906995

The Computerization of Work; A Communication Perspective

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780761906995

  • ISBN10:

    0761906991

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2000-08-16
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications, Inc
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Written by renouned professionals in the fields of information and communication technologies, this volume explores the subject matter through the discussion of theory and field studies as well as insights from other research. Students and researchers alike will appreciate this rare look into the world of technology and society.

Table of Contents

Organizations Meet I/CT
1(27)
Examples of Less Than Fully Successful Implementations
3(5)
Successes or Failures?
7(1)
Some Explanations of the Technology-Organization Link
8(12)
The ``Situatedness'' of Work: Its Inevitable Circumstantiality
9(2)
The Dead Weight of Tradition as an Impediment to Organizational Change
11(2)
I/CT-Based Approaches That Ignore the Inevitability of Organizational Politics
13(4)
Is the Technology Its Own Worst Enemy? The Self-Limiting Properties of Systems Design
17(2)
The Pros and Cons of Dualistic Explanations
19(1)
Toward a Structurational Explanation of the Technology-Organization Link
20(8)
Reevaluating the Four Hypotheses
21(2)
A Brief Overview of Where We Are Heading in the Book
23(2)
Organization of the Chapters
25(3)
Structuration Theory: Basic Concepts
28(23)
Structuration Theory as an Emergent/Process Model
30(1)
Historical Origins of the Theory
30(1)
A Theory Still in Construction
31(1)
Giddens's Concept of Structuration
31(11)
A Recusively and Reflexively Organized World
32(2)
Reflexivity and Knowledge
34(1)
Action and Power
35(1)
A Dialectic of Control
36(1)
Structure Versus System: The Essence of ``Duality''
37(1)
Rules and Resources
38(2)
Dimensions of Structure
40(2)
Structuration as an Explanation of Computerization
42(9)
How Structuration Might Conceptualize an Instance of Computerization
43(2)
What Structuration Theory Does Not Address
45(6)
Expanding the Structurational Perspective
51(28)
The Structuring of Situated Action
51(13)
The Role of Time and Space in Embedding Structure
52(4)
Collaborating Groups as Systems of Distributed Cognition
56(4)
The ``When'' of Infrastructure
60(2)
Structure (Singular)--Or Structures (Plural)?
62(2)
The Issue of Agency
64(10)
The Head-Complement Relation
67(2)
The Origin of Head-Complement Relations in Communication
69(1)
Organization as an Embedded System of Head-Complement Relations
70(2)
An Actor-Network of Actor-Networks
72(1)
The Dimension of Community
73(1)
The Role of Text in Communication
74(3)
Conclusion
77(2)
Communication as the Modality of Structuration
79(32)
Situated Communication: ``A Talking Out of Text in the Circumstances of a Conversation''
80(18)
The Centrality of Agency in Communication Theory
86(2)
Narrative Theory and the Structuring Role of Time
88(1)
What Is Meant by Situation?
89(2)
Imbrication as a Principle of Structuration
91(1)
A Dialectic of Control
92(3)
The Importance of Community
95(1)
Ontological Assumptions of a Situated Theory of Communication
95(1)
``Enactment'' and the ``Dance of Agency'': The Outward Reach of Collaborative Groups
96(2)
Theorizing the Extended Communication Networks of an Organization
98(6)
Organization as a Metaconversation, or ``Conversation of Conversations''
98(1)
The Organization Considered as Itself a Unit of Action
99(3)
Dialectics of Control
102(1)
A Polemic of Perspectives
102(1)
The Role of Text in Constructing the Identity of the Organization
103(1)
Communication, Contradiction, and Computerization
104(7)
Tensions That Arise From Contradictory Professional and Administrative Imperatives
105(1)
Tensions That Arise From Contradictory Process and Function Imperatives
105(1)
Tensions That Arise From Contradictory Local and Global Imperatives
105(1)
The Suchman/Winograd Debate
106(5)
Technology Development: Writing Organization
111(22)
The CSCW Design Challenge
112(4)
The Genesis of the Research Project Described in This Chapter
113(1)
Dimensions of Culture
113(1)
The Objectives of the Research
114(2)
CSCW Systems Design in Denmark
116(4)
Aarhus University
116(4)
A Different Research Environment: Japan
120(4)
Keio University
120(1)
CSCW Systems in Japan
121(3)
Institutional Settings
124(4)
How Aarhus Fits Into the Institutional Setting of Danish Society and the CSCW Community
124(2)
How Keio Fits Into the Institutional Setting of Japan and the CSCW Community
126(2)
Technology: An Ideology of Organization?
128(2)
Society as a ``Surface of Emergence''
130(3)
A-B-X Again
130(3)
Dialectics of Control in a Tiled Organization
133(22)
The Purchasing Department
133(4)
Theoretical Considerations
137(5)
The Purchasing Department Reexamined
137(1)
Different Orientations to the Object
138(1)
Process Versus Function
139(1)
Dialectics of Control
140(1)
Computerization as an Agency of Change
141(1)
The Structurational Point of View
142(1)
Computerization and Politics in the Purchasing Department
142(4)
The Genesis of the Computerization Process
142(3)
The New System
145(1)
Implementing the System
145(1)
A Structurational Explanation of the Computerization of the Purchasing Department
146(5)
A Changed Work Environment
146(2)
The Human Dynamics of Implementation
148(1)
Restructuring the Organization: The Supplier List
149(2)
Conclusion
151(4)
The Critique of BPR
152(3)
Explaining System Integration
155(22)
Structuring the Local and the Global
157(8)
Structurationist Perspectives
158(1)
Adaptive Structuration Theory
158(2)
Structuration and Field Research
160(1)
Barley
160(3)
Orlikowski
163(2)
The Meter Reader Study
165(5)
Institutional Differences
167(3)
Analysis: The Importance of Space/Time in a Theory of Structuration
170(4)
Conclusion
174(3)
Reconciling the Interface
177(16)
Learning as an Organizational Phenomenon
177(5)
``Orders of Learning'' Again
177(2)
Orders of Learning, Levels of Organization
179(3)
Computerization as an Agent of Learning
182(2)
Things That Might Go Wrong When Organizations Computerize
184(7)
Getting the Representation Right?
184(1)
Recent Trends in Design
185(1)
Representing, Not Just Work or Groups, but the Organization Itself
186(1)
Accounting
186(2)
The Narrative of Computerization
188(1)
The Reengineering Story
189(1)
Summary
190(1)
Conclusion: Toward a Research Agenda
191(2)
The Role of Communication Research
192(1)
References 193(8)
Author Index 201(4)
Subject Index 205(4)
About the Authors 209

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