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Concept of Woman Vol. 2 : The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250-1500,9780802847355
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Concept of Woman Vol. 2 : The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250-1500

by
ISBN13:

9780802847355

ISBN10:
0802847358
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Eerdmans Pub Co
List Price: $70.00
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Summary

This seminal work is the second part of a widely praised study of the concept of woman in the history of Western philosophy. Sister Prudence Allen explores claims about sex and gender identity in the works of over fifty philosophers (both men and women) in the late medieval and early Renaissance periods.

Touching on the thought of every philosopher who considered sex or gender identity between A.D. 1250 and 1500, Volume 2 of The Concept of Woman provides the analytical categories necessary for situating contemporary discussion of women in relation to men. Adding to the accessibility of this fine discussion are informative illustrations, helpful summary charts, and extracts of original source material, some not previously available in English.

Encyclopedic in coverage, clearly organized, and well written, The Concept of Woman will be an invaluable resource for readers interested in a wide range of disciplines.

Author Biography

Sister Prudence Allen, R.S.M., is professor of philosophy at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary, Denver, Colorado

Table of Contents

Chronological Tables xiv
Illustrations
xviii
List of Tables
xx
Acknowledgments xxiii
Introduction 1(5)
Review of The Concept of Woman: 750 B.C.-1250 A.D.
6(6)
Transitions in The Concept of Woman: 1250-1500
12(9)
Structure of the Book
21(6)
SECTION I: SEPARATE ENGENDERED DISCOURSE ABOUT WOMEN'S IDENTITY 27(294)
Women Religious Describe Wisdom and Virtue
31(34)
Beatrice of Nazareth
36(5)
Hadewijch
41(8)
Mechtild of Magdeburg
49(8)
Marguerite Porete
57(3)
Discovering Women's Philosophical Voices
60(5)
Aristotelian Roots of Gender Identity in Academia
65(116)
Gender in Academic Examination and Debate
68(6)
Logic, Demonstrative Science, and Gender Identity
74(17)
Substance and Gender Identity
75(2)
Accident and Gender Identity
77(2)
Syllogisms and Gender Identity
79(3)
Robert Grosseteste
82(2)
Roger Bacon
84(3)
William of Ockham
87(4)
Aristotle's Principles of Gender Polarity
91(18)
A Female Is Opposite as a Contrary Privation of the Male
93(2)
The Female Is, as It Were, a Deformed Male
95(6)
A Woman's Rational Faculty Is without Authority over Her Irrational Soul
101(2)
A Lesser Measure of Virtue Is Proper to Women
103(6)
Phases of Translations and Modifications of Aristotle's Voice
109(56)
Sixth Phase, St. Albert the Great
113(4)
Repetition of Aristotle's Gender Polarity Principles
117(2)
Modifications of Aristotle's Gender Polarity Principles
119(3)
New Forms of Support for Aristotle's Gender Polarity Principles
122(5)
Seventh Phase, St. Thomas Aquinas
127(2)
Moderation of Aristotle's Metaphysical Principle of Gender Polarity
129(5)
Qualification and Use of Aristotle's Natural Principle of Gender Polarity
134(7)
Amplification of Aristotle's Epistemological Principle of Gender Polarity
141(3)
Amplification and Modification of Aristotle's Ethical Principle of Gender Polarity
144(8)
Giles of Rome
152(7)
John Duns Scotus
159(6)
Academic Men's Voices about the Concept of Woman
165(16)
Philosophical Content in Early Satires about Women
181(42)
The Concept of Woman in the Ancient Satirical Tradition
182(5)
The Emergence of Extensive Satires about Women
187(29)
Le Roman de la rose
188(12)
Le Livre de Matheolus
200(4)
Frau Welt, Evangile aux Femmes, and Two Dits
204(6)
Boccaccio's Corbaccio
210(6)
Satirical Voices of Reductionism, Exaggeration, and Bias
216(7)
Gender at the Beginnings of Humanism
223(98)
Christian, Neoplatonic, and Stoic Roots of Early Humanist Views of Woman
224(9)
Guido Cavalcanti
233(7)
Dante Alighieri
240(19)
Encountering a Virtuous Woman
242(4)
Projecting a Wise Female Personifcation of Philosophy
246(4)
Being Taught by a Wise and Virtuous Woman
250(9)
Francis Petrarch
259(17)
Encountering Laura's Wisdom and Virtue
263(6)
Describing Other Female Characters and Characteristics
269(7)
Giovanni Boccaccio
276(36)
Dialogues with Fiammetta about Wisdom and Virtue
283(7)
Dialogues among Men and Women about Wisdom and Virtue
290(13)
Describing Virtues of Famous Women
303(9)
Humanist Dialogue and New Forms of Gender Identity
312(9)
Summary and Evaluation of Section I: Gender and Isolated Communities of Discourse
315(6)
SECTION II: THE BEGINNING OF PUBLIC DIALOGUE ABOUT GENDER 321(744)
Women Religious Authors Develop Analogical Thinking
323(116)
Monastic Authors
330(14)
St. Mechtild of Hackeborn
331(7)
St. Gertrude the Great of Helfta
338(6)
The Dominican Influence
344(22)
Johannes Eckhart's Gender Theory in His Latin Writings
345(6)
Eckhart's Gender Theory in His German Writings
351(5)
Johannes Tauler
356(3)
Henry Suso and Elsbeth Stagel
359(7)
Individual Women Religious Authors
366(62)
St. Bridget of Sweden
366(14)
St. Catherine of Siena
380(7)
Transcendental Analogy of Christ as Vertical Bridge
387(6)
Public Activity as a Woman's Virtue
393(3)
Gender-Related Virtues
396(2)
Bl. Julian of Norwich
398(5)
The Use of Reason
403(4)
A Metaphysics of Substance and Sensuality
407(4)
Transcendental Analogy of Christ Our Mother
411(17)
Analogical Thinking, Dialogue, and Gender Identity in Women Religious Authors
428(11)
Deterioration of Intergender Dialogue in Later Satires and Public Trials
439(98)
Manuscripts, Printing, and the Dispersion of Traditional Satires
440(7)
New Satires against Women
447(14)
Le Miroir de mariage
448(6)
Les Quinze joies de mariage
454(7)
Intergender Dialogue in Arrests and Trials of Individual Women
461(42)
Margery Kempe
461(16)
St. Joan of Arc
477(26)
The Malleus maleficarum (The Witches' Hammer)
503(26)
Witchcraft and Women's Identity
506(4)
Invoking Philosophical and Satirical Authority to Devalue Women
510(7)
Calculated Deception in Intergender Dialogue
517(7)
Women and Witchcraft Trials
524(5)
Satires, Deception, and the Degeneration of Intergender Dialogue
529(8)
Early Humanist Dialogue about the Concept of Woman
537(122)
Christine de Pizan's Life and Relation to Communities of Discourse
541(24)
Academic Community of Discourse
541(9)
Religious Community of Discourse
550(7)
Humanist Community of Discourse
557(7)
Satirical Community of Discourse
564(1)
Christine de Pizan's Part in the Querelle de la rose
565(45)
Rational Appeal for Justice
566(12)
Dialogue with Jean de Montreuil
578(6)
Dialogue with Gontier Col
584(5)
Dialogues with Queen Isabeau, Provost Guillaume de Tignonville, and Chancellor Jean Gerson
589(4)
Dialogue with Pierre Col
593(10)
The Reentry of Jean Gerson and Jean de Montreuil
603(2)
Summary of the Arguments in Querelle de la rose
605(5)
Christine de Pizan's Livre de la Cite des dames
610(44)
First Dialogue with Lady Justice
615(5)
Dialogue with Lady Reason
620(12)
Dialogue with Lady Rectitude
632(7)
Second Dialogue with Lady Justice and the Virgin Mary
639(7)
Summary of Arguments in Le Livre de la Cite des dames
646(1)
Concluding Reflections on Virtue
646(8)
Christine de Pizan's Humanist Foundations for Gender Theory
654(5)
The Early Humanist Reformation in Education for Women
659(102)
Women's Education in Philosophy through the Fourteenth Century
661(10)
Vincent of Beauvais
666(2)
Francesco Barberino
668(3)
Fifteenth-Century Founders of Humanistic Schools
671(12)
Guarino of Verona
672(5)
Vittorino of Feltre and the Gonzaga Household
677(6)
Leonardo Bruni
683(29)
Civic Humanism and Gender Identity
686(5)
The Household of Battista Malatesta
691(21)
Francesco Barbaro
712(20)
Gender and the Household
713(11)
Barbaro's Daughters
724(3)
Early Translations of Plato and Gender Identity
727(5)
Albrecht von Eyb
732(23)
Book about Marriage
734(15)
Conrad Celtis and the Roswitha Manuscripts
749(6)
Education of Women to the Third Generation
755(6)
The Early Humanist Reformation in Theory about Gender
761(174)
Nicholas of Cusa
762(27)
Direct Schema of Gender Identity
766(14)
Indirect Arguments about the Concept of Woman
780(9)
Leon Battista Alberti
789(41)
Early Concept of Woman
793(5)
Middle Concept of Woman
798(18)
Later Concept of Woman
816(14)
Lorenzo Valla
830(24)
Women, Pleasure, and the Good
831(9)
Use of Plato's Principles of Gender
840(14)
Marsilio Ficino
854(50)
Gender Identity Themes Transmitted through Plato's Dialogues
860(9)
Reinterpretation of Plato's Philosophy of Gender
869(2)
Gender and the Soul/Body Relation
871(12)
Platonic Love and Friendship
883(7)
Women Philosophers
890(5)
Engendered Virtues
895(9)
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola
904(29)
Gender Theory in the 900 Theses
909(9)
Human Dignity
918(5)
Gender Neutrality in Love and Beauty
923(10)
The Struggle to Reform the Theory of Gender Identity
933(2)
The Early Humanist Reformation by Women Philosophers
935(130)
Isotta Nogarola and Ludovico Foscarini
944(25)
The Tri-level Dialogue about Adam and Eve
945(10)
A Woman Humanist's Search for Meaning
955(14)
Laura Cereta
969(76)
Philosophical Autobiography
973(20)
Gender and Self-Knowledge
993(13)
Interpersonal Dialogue about Self-Governance
1006(9)
Public Action Building the Common Good
1015(22)
Integral Gender Complementarity
1037(8)
Early Humanist Women Philosophers' Attention to Person-in-Relation
1045(20)
Summary and Evaluation of Section II: Gender and Integrated Communities of Discourse
1051(14)
Conclusion 1065(26)
Women's Contributions to the Reform of the Concept of Woman
1065(6)
New Relation to Space and Time
1071(13)
Theoretical Conclusions about the Concept of Woman (1250-1500)
1084(5)
Evaluation of Weaknesses and Strengths
1089(2)
Bibliography 1091(39)
Index 1130


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