9780471629788

Concepts and Models of Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Edition

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780471629788

  • ISBN10:

    0471629782

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1994-02-01
  • Publisher: Wiley

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Summary

A clear introduction to modern inorganic chemistry, covering both theory and descriptive chemistry. Uses concepts and models as an organizing principle to facilitate students' integration of ideas. This edition contains a new chapter on group theory and offers expanded coverage of solid state. Features numerous figures and solved examples.

Table of Contents

PART I Some Basic Concepts 1(148)
CHAPTER 1 Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
3(51)
1.1 Models in Chemistry
3(2)
1.2 Historical Background
5(3)
1.3 Atomic Structure and the Basis of the Periodic Table
8(24)
1.4 Spectroscopic Terms and the Zeeman Effect; One-Electron Atoms
32(2)
1.5 The Vector Model and Term Structure for Polyelectron Atoms
34(8)
1.6 Ionization Energies
42(4)
1.7 Electron Affinities
46(1)
1.8 Absolute Electronegativity and Absolute Hardness
47(3)
General References
50(1)
Problems
51(3)
CHAPTER 2 Molecular Models
54(51)
2.1 Review of Covalent Bonding
54(12)
2.2 Valence Bond (Pauling-Slater) Theory
66(6)
2.3 Shapes of Molecules
72(10)
2.4 Electronegativity
82(6)
2.5 Radii of Atoms in Covalent Compounds
88(4)
2.6 The Hydrogen Bond
92(7)
2.7 Weak Interactions in Covalent Substances
99(3)
General References
102(1)
Problems
102(3)
CHAPTER 3 Symmetry
105(44)
3.1 Introduction
105(1)
3.2 Symmetry Elements and Symmetry Operations
106(8)
3.3 Introduction to Groups
114(2)
3.4 Symmetry Point Groups
116(11)
3.5 Class Structure, Representations, and Character Tables
127(11)
3.6 Chemical Applications of Symmetry
138(3)
3.7 Summary of Terminology and Notation from Symmetry and Group Theory
141(3)
General References
144(1)
Appendix 3.1 Matrix Representation of Transformation and Matrix Multiplication
144(3)
Appendix 3.2 The Direct Product of Representations
147(1)
Problems
147(2)
PART II Bonding and Structure 149(158)
CHAPTER 4 Discrete Molecules: Molecular Orbitals
151(47)
4.1 Diatomic Molecules
151(12)
4.2 Linnett's Double Quartet
163(3)
4.3 Triatomic Molecules
166(10)
4.4 Xenon Difluoride
176(1)
4.5 Boron Trifluoride--A Group Theoretical Treatment
177(8)
4.6 Diborane
185(3)
4.7 Cyclic-Planar (Pie) Molecules
188(5)
4.8 Basis Sets and Frontier Orbitals
193(3)
General References
196(1)
Problems
196(2)
CHAPTER 5 Inorganic Solids: Ionic Models
198(53)
5.1 Simple Ionic Solids
199(5)
5.2 Close Packing
204(2)
5.3 Ionic Structures Based Upon Close-Packed Arrangements
206(5)
5.4 Radius Ratios for Stable Arrangements in Ionic Crystals
211(1)
5.5 Common Structures of Ionic Crystals
212(8)
5.6 Notation for Structures Based Upon Close Packing
220(1)
5.7 Ionic Radii
221(3)
5.8 Lattice Energy
224(11)
5.9 Solubilities of Ionic Substances
235(3)
5.10 Giant Molecules
238(1)
5.11 Structures of Silicates
239(7)
5.12 Crystal Structures of Metals
246(2)
General References
248(1)
Problems
249(2)
CHAPTER 6 Solid-State Chemistry
251(56)
6.1 Crystal Structure
251(13)
6.2 Defect Structures
264(4)
6.3 Electronic Structure of Solids
268(16)
6.4 Graphite as a Two-Dimensional Solid
284(8)
6.5 Metals, Insulators, and Semiconductors
292(2)
6.6 Some Limitations and Extensions of the Simple Band Theory
294(1)
6.7 Superconductivity
295(5)
6.8 Buckminsterfullerene
300(3)
General References
303(1)
Problems
304(3)
PART III Chemical Reactions 307(70)
CHAPTER 7 Acids and Bases
309(41)
7.1 Models of Acids and Bases
309(4)
7.2 Protonic Acids
313(13)
7.3 Acid-Base Behavior of the Binary Oxides and Aqua Cations
326(7)
7.4 Nonprotonic Concepts of Acid-Base Reactions
333(10)
7.5 The Drago-Wayland Equation
343(3)
7.6 Solid Acids
346(1)
General References
347(1)
Problems
347(3)
CHAPTER 8 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions
350(27)
8.1 Conventions Covering Standard States
350(2)
8.2 Methods of Determining Changes in Free Energy
352(1)
8.3 Schematic Representation of Galvanic Cells
353(1)
8.4 Conventions Regarding Cells
354(2)
8.5 Calculations Using emf Data
356(7)
8.6 Pourbaix (or Predominance Area) Diagrams
363(3)
8.7 Geochemistry of Manganese
366(2)
8.8 Periodic Trends among the Transition Elements
368(2)
8.9 Some Redox Reactions of Nonmetals
370(2)
8.10 Equilibrium Constants from emf Data
372(1)
General References
373(1)
Problems
373(4)
PART IV Coordination Chemistry 377(182)
CHAPTER 9 Models and Stereochemistry
379(62)
9.1 Introduction
379(2)
9.2 Analytical Applications
381(2)
9.3 Brief Summary of Nomenclature of Coordination Compounds
383(1)
9.4 Stabilities of Coordination Compounds
384(6)
9.5 Werner's Coordination Theory
390(2)
9.6 Valence Bond Models
392(6)
9.7 Simple Electrostatic Models of Bonding
398(3)
9.8 The Ligand-Field Theory
401(10)
9.9 Isomerism of Coordination Compounds
411(2)
9.10 Coordination Number Four
413(2)
9.11 Coordination Number Six
415(9)
9.12 Coordination Number Five
424(3)
9.13 Lower Coordination Numbers
427(1)
9.14 Higher Coordination Numbers
428(4)
9.15 Stereochemically Nonrigid and Fluxional Molecules
432(5)
General References
437(1)
Problems
438(3)
CHAPTER 10 Spectra and Bonding
441(41)
10.1 Introduction
441(1)
10.2 Ligand-Field Spectra of Octahedral Complexes
442(17)
10.3 Complexes of Lower Symmetry
459(4)
10.4 Charge Transfer Bands
463(2)
10.5 Circular Dichroism and Optical Rotatory Dispersion
465(3)
10.6 Pictorial Molecular-Orbital Description of Bonding
468(3)
10.7 Effects of (Pie) Bonding
471(1)
10.8 Group Theoretical Treatment
472(6)
10.9 Comparison of the Different Approaches to Bonding in Coordination Compounds
478(1)
General References
478(1)
Problems
479(3)
CHAPTER 11 Reaction Mechanisms
482(77)
11.1 The Kinetic Model
482(4)
11.2 Introduction to Ligand Substitution Reactions
486(1)
11.3 Octahedral Complexes: Ligand Substitution Reactions
487(30)
11.4 Racemization Reactions
517(2)
11.5 Square-Planar Complexes: Ligand Substitution Reactions
519(9)
11.6 Catalysis of Substitution by Redox Processes
528(1)
11.7 Redox Reactions
528(15)
11.8 Photochemical Reactions
543(6)
General References
549(1)
Problems
549(10)
PART V Organometallic Chemistry 559(144)
CHAPTER 12 General Principles
561(53)
12.1 Introduction
562(1)
12.2 Carbonyl Complexes
562(15)
12.3 Bonding of Organic Ligands to Metals
577(20)
12.4 Experimental Evidence for Back-Donation
597(6)
12.5 Structural Characterization of Organometallic Compounds
603(2)
12.6 The Isolobal Analogy
605(1)
12.7 Dihydrogen Complexes
606(3)
General References
609(1)
Problems
609(5)
CHAPTER 13 Survey of Organometallic Compounds
614(39)
13.1 Some Chemistry of Olefin Complexes
614(1)
13.2 Alkyne Complexes
615(4)
13.3 Allyl Complexes
619(3)
13.4 Butadiene Complexes
622(4)
13.5 Cyclic (Pie) Complexes
626(9)
13.6 Compounds with Metal-Carbon (Sigma) Bonds
635(11)
13.7 Compounds with Multiple Metal-Carbon Bonds
646(4)
General References
650(1)
Problems
650(3)
CHAPTER 14 Organometallic Reactions, Mechanisms, and Catalysis
653(50)
14.1 Fundamental Reactions
653(32)
14.2 Homogeneous Catalysis by Soluble Transition Metal Complexes
685(12)
General References
697(1)
Problems
697(6)
PART VI Selected Topics 703
CHAPTER 15 Chemistry and Periodic Trends among Metals
705(55)
15.1 General Periodic Trends among Metals
705(3)
15.2 Group 1 (IA)--The Alkali Metals
708(10)
15.3 Group 2 (IIA)--The Alkaline Earth Metals
718(6)
15.4 Group 11 (IB)--The Coinage Metals
724(5)
15.5 Group 12 (IIB)--The Zinc Subgroup
729(3)
15.6 Group 3 (IIIA)--The Scandium Family and Rare Earths
732(5)
15.7 The Actinide Metals
737(1)
15.8 Transition Metals, Groups 4-7 (IVA-VIIA)
738(9)
15.9 Groups 8, 9, and 10 (Group VIII)
747(4)
15.10 Compounds Containing Metal-Metal Bonds
751(6)
General References
757(1)
Problems
757(3)
CHAPTER 16 Chemistry of Some Nonmetals
760(56)
16.1 General Periodic Trends for Nonmetals
760(1)
16.2 Nitrogen and Phosphorus
761(12)
16.3 Oxygen, Sulfur, and Selenium
773(16)
16.4 The Halogens
789(18)
16.5 The Noble Gases
807(5)
General References
812(1)
Problems
813(3)
CHAPTER 17 Cluster and Cage Compounds
816(72)
17.1 Introduction
816(3)
17.2 The Bonding Problem in Boranes
819(4)
17.3 Structures of the Boron Hydrides
823(3)
17.4 Molecular Orbital Description of Bonding in Boron Hydrides
826(6)
17.5 Heteroboranes
832(2)
17.6 Chemistry of the Boranes
834(7)
17.7 Synthesis of Boron Hydrides
841(2)
17.8 Carboranes
843(4)
17.9 Some Chemistry of Group 13
847(7)
17.10 Cluster Compounds
854(23)
17.11 Electron-Precise Compounds and their Relation to Clusters
877(2)
General References
879(1)
Problems
880(8)
CHAPTER 18 Bioinorganic Chemistry
888
18.1 Essential Elements
888(5)
18.2 Oxygen Utilization
893(8)
18.3 Supply and Storage of Iron
901(4)
18.4 Oxidation-Reduction Processes
905(5)
18.5 Metalloenzymes
910(9)
18.6 Vitamin B(12)
919(3)
18.7 Nitrogenase
922(2)
18.8 Photosynthesis
924(2)
18.9 Roles of Na^+, K^+, Mg^2+, Ca^2+, and Ion Pumps
926(1)
General References
927(1)
Problems
928
APPENDIX A Units A-1
APPENDIX B Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry B-1
APPENDIX C Character Tables C-1
APPENDIX D Tanabe-Sugano Diagrams D-1
APPENDIX E Standard Half-Cell emf Data E-1
INDEX I-1

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