9780133943023

Concepts of Programming Languages

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780133943023

  • ISBN10:

    013394302X

  • Edition: 11th
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2/6/2015
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

For courses in computer programming.

 

Evaluating the Fundamentals of Computer Programming Languages

Concepts of Computer Programming Languages introduces students to the fundamental concepts of computer programming languages and provides them with the tools necessary to evaluate contemporary and future languages. An in-depth discussion of programming language structures, such as syntax and lexical and syntactic analysis, also prepares readers to study compiler design.


The Eleventh Edition maintains an up-to-date discussion on the topic with the removal of outdated languages such as Ada and Fortran. The addition of relevant new topics and examples such as reflection and exception handling in Python and Ruby add to the currency of the text. Through a critical analysis of design issues of various program languages, Concepts of Computer Programming Languages teaches programmers the essential differences between computing with specific languages.

Author Biography

Robert Sebesta is an Associate Professor Emeritus in the Computer Science Department at the University of Colorado–Colorado Springs. Professor Sebesta received a BS in applied mathematics from the University of Colorado in Boulder and MS and PhD degrees in computer science from Pennsylvania State University. He has taught computer science for more than 40 years. His professional interests are the design and evaluation of programming languages and Web programming.

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Preliminaries

1.1 Reasons for Studying Concepts of Programming Languages

1.2 Programming Domains

1.3 Language Evaluation Criteria

1.4 Influences on Language Design

1.5 Language Categories

1.6 Language Design Trade-Offs

1.7 Implementation Methods

1.8 Programming Environments

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set

Chapter 2 Evolution of the Major Programming Languages

2.1 Zuse’s Plankalkül

2.2 Pseudocodes

2.3 The IBM 704 and Fortran

2.4 Functional Programming: Lisp

2.5 The First Step Toward Sophistication: ALGOL 60

2.6 Computerizing Business Records: COBOL

2.7 The Beginnings of Timesharing: Basic

Interview: Alan Cooper—User Design and Language Design

2.8 Everything for Everybody: PL/I

2.9 Two Early Dynamic Languages: APL and SNOBOL

2.10 The Beginnings of Data Abstraction: SIMULA 67

2.11 Orthogonal Design: ALGOL 68

2.12 Some Early Descendants of the ALGOLs

2.13 Programming Based on Logic: Prolog

2.14 History’s Largest Design Effort: Ada

2.15 Object-Oriented Programming: Smalltalk

2.16 Combining Imperative and Object-Oriented Features: C++

2.17 An Imperative-Based Object-Oriented Language: Java

2.18 Scripting Languages

2.19 The Flagship .NET Language: C#

2.20 Markup-Programming Hybrid Languages

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 3 Describing Syntax and Semantics

3.1 Introduction

3.2 The General Problem of Describing Syntax

3.3 Formal Methods of Describing Syntax

3.4 Attribute Grammars

History Note

3.5 Describing the Meanings of Programs: Dynamic Semantics

History Note

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set

 

Chapter 4 Lexical and Syntax Analysis 161

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Lexical Analysis

4.3 The Parsing Problem

4.4 Recursive-Descent Parsing

4.5 Bottom-Up Parsing

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 5 Names, Bindings, and Scopes 197

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Names

History Note

5.3 Variables

5.4 The Concept of Binding

5.5 Scope

5.6 Scope and Lifetime

5.7 Referencing Environments

5.8 Named Constants

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

 

Chapter 6 Data Types

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Primitive Data Types

6.3 Character String Types

History Note

6.4 Enumeration Types

6.5 Array Types

History Note

History Note

6.6 Associative Arrays

Interview: ROBERTO IERUSALIMSCHY—Lua

6.7 Record Types

6.8 Tuple Types

6.9 List Types

6.10 Union Types

6.11 Pointer and Reference Types

History Note

6.12 Type Checking

6.13 Strong Typing

6.14 Type Equivalence

6.15 Theory and Data Types

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 7 Expressions and Assignment Statements 301

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Arithmetic Expressions

7.3 Overloaded Operators

7.4 Type Conversions

History Note

7.5 Relational and Boolean Expressions

History Note

7.6 Short-Circuit Evaluation

7.7 Assignment Statements

History Note

7.8 Mixed-Mode Assignment

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 8 Statement-Level Control Structures

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Selection Statements

8.3 Iterative Statements

8.4 Unconditional Branching

History Note

8.5 Guarded Commands

8.6 Conclusions

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 9 Subprograms

9.1 Introduction

9.2 Fundamentals of Subprograms

9.3 Design Issues for Subprograms

9.4 Local Referencing Environments

9.5 Parameter-Passing Methods

History Note

9.6 Parameters That Are Subprograms

History Note

9.7 Calling Subprograms Indirectly

9.8 Design Issues for Functions

9.9 Overloaded Subprograms

9.10 Generic Subprograms

9.11 User-Defined Overloaded Operators

9.12 Closures

9.13 Coroutines

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 10 Implementing Subprograms

10.1 The General Semantics of Calls and Returns

10.2 Implementing “Simple” Subprograms

10.3 Implementing Subprograms with Stack-Dynamic

Local Variables

10.4 Nested Subprograms

10.5 Blocks

10.6 Implementing Dynamic Scoping

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 11 Abstract Data Types and Encapsulation Constructs

11.1 The Concept of Abstraction

11.2 Introduction to Data Abstraction

11.3 Design Issues for Abstract Data Types

11.4 Language Examples

Interview: bjarne stroustrup—C++: Its Birth,

Its Ubiquitousness, and Common Criticisms

11.5 Parameterized Abstract Data Types

11.6 Encapsulation Constructs

11.7 Naming Encapsulations

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 12 Support for Object-Oriented Programming

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Object-Oriented Programming

12.3 Design Issues for Object-Oriented Languages

12.4 Support for Object-Oriented Programming in

Specific Languages

Interview: BJARNE STROUSTRUP—On Paradigms and

Better Programming

12.5 Implementation of Object-Oriented Constructs

12.6 Reflection

Summary • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

 

Chapter 13 Concurrency

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Introduction to Subprogram-Level Concurrency

13.3 Semaphores

13.4 Monitors

13.5 Message Passing

13.6 Ada Support for Concurrency

13.7 Java Threads

13.8 C# Threads

13.9 Concurrency in Functional Languages

13.10 Statement-Level Concurrency

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Chapter 14 Exception Handling and Event Handling

14.1 Introduction to Exception Handling

History Note

14.2 Exception Handling in C++

14.3 Exception Handling in Java

14.4 Exception Handling in Python and Ruby

14.5 Introduction to Event Handling

14.6 Event Handling with Java

14.7 Event Handling in C#

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

 

Chapter 15 Functional Programming Languages

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Mathematical Functions

15.3 Fundamentals of Functional Programming Languages

15.4 The First Functional Programming Language: Lisp

15.5 An Introduction to Scheme

15.6 Common Lisp

15.7 ML

15.8 Haskell

15.9 F#

15.10 Support for Functional Programming in Primarily

Imperative Languages

15.11 A Comparison of Functional and Imperative Languages

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set •

Programming Exercises

Chapter 16 Logic Programming Languages

16.1 Introduction

16.2 A Brief Introduction to Predicate Calculus

16.3 Predicate Calculus and Proving Theorems

16.4 An Overview of Logic Programming

16.5 The Origins of Prolog

16.6 The Basic Elements of Prolog

16.7 Deficiencies of Prolog

16.8 Applications of Logic Programming

Summary • Bibliographic Notes • Review Questions • Problem Set • Programming Exercises

Bibliography

Index

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