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Concepts of Programming Languages,9780201385960

Concepts of Programming Languages

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780201385960

ISBN10:
0201385961
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/1998
Publisher(s):
Addison-Wesley Pub Co
List Price: $92.00

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Summary

This market leader now offers coverage of Java "TM" support for object-oriented programming, concurrency, and exception handling. It also features object-oriented programming more prominently throughout and provides expanded material on semantics. As in previous editions, Bob Sebesta describes fundamental concepts of programming languages by defining the design issues of the various language constructs, examining the design choices for these constructs in some of the most common languages, and critically comparing the design alternatives.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Preliminaries
1(36)
1.1 Reasons for Studying Concepts of Programming Languages
2(3)
1.2 Programming Domains
5(3)
1.3 Language Evaluation Criteria
8(12)
1.4 Influences on Language Design
20(3)
1.5 Language Categories
23(1)
1.6 Language Design Trade-Offs
24(1)
1.7 Implementation Methods
25(6)
1.8 Programming Environments
31(6)
Chapter 2 Evolution of the Major Programming Languages
37(68)
2.1 Zuse's Plankalkul
38(3)
2.2 Minimal Hardware Programming: Pseudocodes
41(3)
2.3 The IBM 704 and FORTRAN
44(5)
2.4 Functional Programming: LISP
49(6)
2.5 The First Step Toward Sophistication: ALGOL 60
55(6)
2.6 Computerizing Business Records: COBOL
61(5)
2.7 The Beginnings of Timesharing: BASIC
66(2)
2.8 Everything for Everybody: PL/I
68(5)
2.9 Two Early Dynamic Languages: APL and SNOBOL
73(1)
2.10 The Beginnings of Data Abstraction: SIMULA 67
74(1)
2.11 Orthogonal Design: ALGOL 68
75(2)
2.12 Some Important Descendants of the ALGOLs
77(7)
2.13 Programming Based on Logic: Prolog
84(1)
2.14 History's Largest Design Effort: Ada
85(6)
2.15 Object-Oriented Programming: Smalltalk
91(3)
2.16 Combining Imperative and Object-Oriented Features: C++
94(3)
2.17 Programming the World Wide Web: Java
97(8)
Chapter 3 Describing syntax and Semantics
105(50)
3.1 Introduction
106(1)
3.2 The General Problem of Describing Syntax
107(2)
3.3 Formal Methods of Describing Syntax
109(14)
3.4 Recursive Descent Parsing
123(2)
3.5 Attribute Grammars
125(7)
3.6 Describing the Meaning of Programs: Dynamic Semantics
132(23)
Chapter 4 Names, Bindings, Type Checking, and Scopes
155(40)
4.1 Introduction
156(1)
4.2 Names
157(2)
4.3 Variables
159(3)
4.4 The Concept of Binding
162(8)
4.5 Type Checking
170(1)
4.6 Strong Typing
170(2)
4.7 Type Compatibility
172(3)
4.8 Scope
175(8)
4.9 Scope and Lifetime
183(1)
4.10 Referencing Environments
183(2)
4.11 Named Constants
185(2)
4.12 Variable Initialization
187(8)
Chapter 5 Data Types
195(64)
5.1 Introduction
196(1)
5.2 Primitive Data Types
197(4)
5.3 Character String Types
201(5)
5.4 User-Defined Ordinal Types
206(4)
5.5 Array Types
210(13)
5.6 Associative Arrays
223(1)
5.7 Record Types
224(5)
5.8 Union Types
229(6)
5.9 Set Types
235(3)
5.10 Pointer Types
238(21)
Chapter 6 Expression and the Assignment Statement
259(28)
6.1 Introduction
260(1)
6.2 Arithmetic Expressions
261(8)
6.3 Overloaded Operators
269(2)
6.4 Type Conversions
271(3)
6.5 Relational and Boolean Expressions
274(3)
6.6 Short-Circuit Evaluation
277(1)
6.7 Assignment Statements
278(5)
6.8 Mixed-Mode Assignment
283(4)
Chapter 7 Statement-Level Control Structures
287(42)
7.1 Introduction
288(1)
7.2 Compound Statements
289(1)
7.3 Selection Statements
290(12)
7.4 Iterative Statements
302(13)
7.5 Unconditional Branching
315(3)
7.6 Guarded Commands
318(4)
7.7 Conclusions
322(7)
Chapter 8 Subprograms
329(48)
8.1 Introduction
330(1)
8.2 Fundamentals of Subprograms
330(6)
8.3 Design Issues for Subprograms
336(1)
8.4 Local Referencing Environment
337(1)
8.5 Parameter-Passing Methods
338(19)
8.6 Parameters That Are Subprogram Names
357(2)
8.7 Overloaded Subprograms
359(2)
8.8 Generic Subprograms
361(4)
8.9 Separate and Independent Compilation
365(1)
8.10 Design Issues for Functions
366(1)
8.11 Accessing Nonlocal Environments
367(3)
8.12 User-Defined Overloaded Operators
370(1)
8.13 Coroutines
370(7)
Chapter 9 Implementing Subprograms
377(34)
9.1 The General Semantics of Calls and Returns
378(1)
9.2 Implementing FORTRAN 77 Subprograms
379(2)
9.3 Implementing Subprograms in ALGOL-like Languages
381(18)
9.4 Blocks
399(1)
9.5 Implementing Dynamic Scoping
400(4)
9.6 Implementing Parameters That Are Subprogram Names
404(7)
Chapter 10 Abstract Data Types
411(24)
10.1 The Concept of Abstraction
412(1)
10.2 Encapsulation
413(1)
10.3 Introduction to Data Abstraction
414(3)
10.4 Design Issues
417(1)
10.5 Language Examples
418(11)
10.6 Parameterized Abstract Data Types
429(6)
Chapter 11 Support for Object-Oriented Programming
435(54)
11.1 Introduction
436(1)
11.2 Object-Oriented Programming
436(5)
11.3 Design Issues for Object-Oriented Languages
441(5)
11.4 Overview of Smalltalk
446(1)
11.5 Introduction to the Smalltalk Language
447(11)
11.6 Smalltalk Example Programs
458(5)
11.7 Large-Scale Features of Smalltalk
463(2)
11.8 Evaluation of Smalltalk
465(1)
11.9 Support for Object-Oriented Programming in C++
466(8)
11.10 Support for Object-Oriented Programming in Java
474(2)
11.11 Support for Object-Oriented Programming in Ada 95
476(4)
11.12 Support for Object-Oriented Programming in Eiffel
480(3)
11.13 Implementation of Object-Oriented Constructs
483(6)
Chapter 12 Concurrency
489(44)
12.1 Introduction
490(3)
12.3 Introduction to Subprogram-Level Concurrency
493(5)
12.3 Semaphores
498(5)
12.4 Monitors
503(4)
12.5 Message Passing
507(10)
12.6 Concurrency in Ada 95
517(3)
12.7 Java Threads
520(6)
12.8 Statement-Level Concurrency
526(7)
Chapter 13 Exception Handling
533(34)
13.1 Introduction to Exception Handling
534(6)
13.2 Exception Handling in PL/I
540(5)
13.3 Exception Handling in Ada
545(6)
13.4 Exception Handling in C++
551(4)
13.5 Exception Handling in Java
555(12)
Chapter 14 Functional Programming Languages
567(38)
14.1 Introduction
568(1)
14.2 Mathematical Functions
569(2)
14.3 Fundamentals of Functional Programming Languages
571(2)
14.4 The First Functional Programming Language: LISP
573(3)
14.5 An Introduction to Scheme
576(15)
14.6 COMMON LISP
591(2)
14.7 ML
593(2)
14.8 Haskell
595(3)
14.9 Applications of Functional Languages
598(1)
14.10 A Comparison of Functional and Imperative Languages
599(6)
Chapter 15 Logic Programming Languages
605(36)
15.1 Introduction
606(1)
15.2 A Brief Introduction to Predicate Calculus
606(4)
15.3 Predicate Calculus and Proving Theorems
610(2)
15.4 An Overview of Logic Programming
612(2)
15.5 The Origins of Prolog
614(1)
15.6 The Basic Elements of Prolog
614(14)
15.7 Deficiencies of Prolog
628(6)
15.8 Applications of Logic Programming
634(2)
15.9 Conclusions
636(5)
Bibliography 641(12)
Index 653


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