9780130646323

Concrete

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130646323

  • ISBN10:

    0130646326

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 8/20/2002
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

This book presents a unified view of concrete behavior in light of a body of chemical and physical principles. It provides the most up-to-date information available on new concrete materials.The most up-to-date information on new concrete materials. SI units used as primary system, keeping readers current to the unit system being adopted in the United States. Latest ASTM specifications are included. Exercises at the end of each chapter. An excellent resource for professionals in this industry.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Concrete as a Material
1(6)
The Nature of Concrete
1(2)
Advantages of Concrete
3(3)
Limitations of Concrete
6(1)
Bibliography
6(1)
Historical Development of Cement and Concrete
7(8)
Nonhydraulic Cements
7(2)
Hydraulic Limes
9(1)
Development of Portland Cement
9(4)
Concrete Admixtures
13(1)
Summary
13(2)
Bibliography
14(1)
Cements
15(42)
Manufacture of Portland Cement
15(6)
Composition of Portland Cement
21(10)
Modified Portland Cements
31(10)
Non-Portland Inorganic Cements
41(3)
Specifications and Tests of Portland Cement
44(13)
Bibliography
54(1)
Problems
55(2)
Hydration of Portland Cement
57(36)
Chemistry of Hydration
57(8)
Properties of the Hydration Products
65(4)
Microstructure of Hydrated Cement Pastes
69(11)
Properties of Hydrated Cement Pastes
80(13)
Bibliography
90(1)
Problems
91(2)
Mineral Admixtures and Blended Cements
93(22)
Pozzolanic Materials
94(8)
Blast Furnace Slag
102(2)
Blended Cements
104(2)
Proportioning with Mineral Admixtures
106(1)
Effects on Properties of Fresh and Hardening Concrete
107(8)
Bibliography
113(1)
Problems
114(1)
Water
115(6)
Water as a Material
115(2)
Water Quality
117(4)
Bibliography
120(1)
Problems
120(1)
Aggregates
121(44)
Properties Required for Mix Design
122(18)
Durability of Aggregates
140(15)
Nonstandard Aggregates
155(10)
Chapter Appendix
161(1)
Bibliography
162(1)
Problems
163(2)
Chemical Admixtures
165(28)
Definitions and Classifications
165(1)
Use of Admixtures
166(2)
Air-Entraining Admixtures
168(8)
Water-Reducing Admixtures
176(6)
Admixtures for Set Control
182(5)
Miscellaneous Admixtures
187(6)
Bibliography
190(1)
Problems
191(2)
Fresh Concrete
193(28)
Workability
194(8)
Measurement of Workability
202(8)
Setting of Concrete
210(3)
Tests of Fresh Concrete
213(8)
Bibliography
219(1)
Problems
219(2)
Proportioning Concrete Mixes
221(22)
Basic Considerations
221(1)
Fundamentals of Mix Design
222(4)
ACI Method of Mix Design
226(17)
Bibliography
240(1)
Problems
241(2)
Concrete Construction Practices
243(44)
Batching and Mixing
243(7)
Transportation
250(6)
Placement of Concrete
256(20)
Finishing Concrete
276(3)
Special Aspects of Handling Concrete
279(8)
Bibliography
284(2)
Problems
286(1)
Curing
287(16)
Curing at Ambient Temperatures
287(8)
Curing at Elevated Temperatures
295(8)
Bibliography
300(1)
Problems
301(2)
Response of Concrete to Stress
303(60)
Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ)
304(2)
Modulus of Elasticity
306(9)
Tension and Fracture
315(12)
Compression
327(11)
Cyclic Loading
338(8)
Multiaxial States of Stress
346(4)
Factors Affecting Strength
350(13)
Bibliography
359(2)
Problems
361(2)
Testing of Hardened Concrete
363(38)
Need for ``Standard'' Tests
363(1)
Significance of Tests
364(2)
Tests for Compressive Strength
366(9)
Other Concrete Tests
375(9)
Assessment of Concrete Quality
384(17)
Bibliography
398(1)
Problems
399(2)
Quality Control
401(16)
Measurement of Variability
402(7)
Quality-Control Charts
409(3)
Failure to Meet Specified Requirements
412(5)
Bibliography
414(1)
Problems
415(2)
Time-Dependent Deformation
417(42)
Plastic Shrinkage
417(1)
Drying Shrinkage
418(14)
Strain-Rate Effects
432(8)
Creep of Concrete
440(13)
Prediction of Shrinkage and Creep
453(6)
Bibliography
456(1)
Problems
457(2)
Other Properties of Concrete
459(18)
Thermal Properties
459(11)
Resistance to Wear
470(3)
Other properties
473(4)
Bibliography
476(1)
Problems
476(1)
Durability
477(40)
Permeability of Concrete
477(6)
Chemical Transport
483(2)
Chemical Attack
485(14)
Physical Attack
499(6)
Cracking in Concrete
505(4)
Repair and Maintenance of Concrete
509(8)
Bibliography
513(1)
Problems
514(3)
High-Strength Concrete
517(30)
Materials Selection and Proportioning
518(16)
Construction
534(1)
Properties
535(12)
Bibliography
544(1)
Problems
545(2)
Concretes for Special Applications
547(36)
Lightweight Concretes
547(15)
Heavyweight Concretes
562(2)
Architectural Concretes
564(12)
Other Types of Concretes
576(7)
Bibliography
581(1)
Problems
582(1)
Cement-Polymer Composites
583(16)
Latex-Modified Concrete
584(5)
Polymer-Impregnated Concrete
589(6)
Organoceramics
595(4)
Bibliography
598(1)
Problems
598(1)
Fiber Reinforced Concrete
599(20)
Definitions
602(1)
Fiber-Matrix Bond
603(1)
Mechanics of Fiber Reinforcement
604(2)
Fabrication of FRC
606(1)
Properties of Fiber Reinforced Concrete
607(9)
Applications of FRC
616(3)
Bibliography
617(1)
Problems
617(2)
Appendix---Tests and Specifications for Concrete and Its Constituents 619(6)
Solutions to Numerical Problems 625(4)
Index 629

Excerpts

Portland cement concrete is foremost among the construction materials used in civil engineering projects around the world. The reasons for concrete's preeminence are varied, but among the more important are the economic and widespread availability of its constituents; its versatility and adaptability, as evidenced by the many types of construction in which it is used; and the minimal maintenance requirements during service. As is the case with any material, its successful use depends upon an intelligent application of its properties in design and the supply of a uniform, high quality product. Concrete is unique among major construction materials in that it is generally designed specifically for a particular project using locally available materials. Therefore, the project engineer has full control and responsibility over the final material used in construction. If concrete is not properly designed for the service conditions and is not properly handled and cured, it will result in substandard performance. For example, when concrete bridge decks and pavements commonly require extensive maintenance 5-10 years after placement, it is a clear indication that the material is not being used to its full potential. It is thus essential that engineers acquire a thorough understanding of the material properties of concretes and the procedures that are essential to providing a material of the required quality and durability.In the past, concrete technology has been taught largely as an empirical science. However, there is a body of chemical and physical principles underlying the behavior of concrete that are now relatively well understood. As with the first edition, it is the aim of this text to present a unified view of concrete behavior in light of these principles, rather than as a series of more or less unrelated facts. For instance, the material on the workability of concrete is prefaced by a general discussion of the principles of rheology; mechanical properties are discussed from the point of view of concrete as a composite (or multiphase) material; and the underlying chemistry of hydration and microstructure of the hardened cement paste are emphasized.This book is designed primarily for use at the undergraduate level, but it should also serve as a guide for the professional engineer who did not take a formal course on concrete in college. The text is based on the authors' considerable experience in teaching the principles of concrete at the undergraduate level. It includes the most up-to-date information available on new concrete materials, and considerable attention is given to the role of specifications for concrete and concrete materials and the use of test methods for determining concrete properties.To provide a comprehensive treatment, more material is included than can be covered in detail in one semester. Therefore, the instructor will have to choose to omit certain topics. Chapter 4 contains more chemistry than might be considered desirable for an undergraduate course and could be treated in less detail by concentrating only on the reactions of the principal cement compounds. Also, those sections in Chapter 16 dealing with mechanisms of shrinkage, strain-rate dependence, and creep could be omitted if desired, although they contribute to a more basic understanding of the material. Chapters 21 and 22 could be passed over without loss of continuity, while parts of Chapters 15,18 and 20 could also be omitted, depending on the instructor's interests and the emphasis of the curriculum.The book is divided into three main parts: The properties of the constituent materials: cements, hardened cement paste, aggregates, water and admixtures. Proportioning of concrete mixes and construction practices: mixing, transporting, placing and consolidating, and curing. The properties of hardened concrete: strength and fracture, fatigue, Creep and drying shrinkage, and durability.

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