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Construction Project Administration,9780130993052
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Construction Project Administration

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780130993052

ISBN10:
0130993050
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $122.80
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Summary

For courses in Construction Management, Construction Contract Administration, and Construction Inspection. Drawing on the author's extensive experience in construction engineering, administration, and education, this text/reference addresses each of the principal contract administration duties in logical order from the hands-on viewpoint of a resident engineer on a construction project. It specifically addresses the responsibility and authority of the Resident Project Representative, unlike other texts which focus on the project manager. The text takes a project team approach for improved job efficiency, outlining a construction team operation in which the administrator delegates to the greatest possible extent all those contract administration functions that can be more effectively done in the field.

Table of Contents

The Project Delivery System
1(35)
Project Participants
1(1)
Construction Administration
2(5)
Control of Quality in Construction
7(1)
Organizational Structure of a Construction Project
8(7)
Professional Construction Management
15(2)
Design-Build Contracts
17(4)
Definitions of Individual Construction Responsibilities
21(5)
Defining Scope of Work in a CM Contract
26(2)
Responsibility for Coordination of the Trades
28(1)
The Partnering Concept
29(4)
Contracting for Public Works Projects
33(2)
Problems
35(1)
Responsibility and Authority
36(16)
The Resident Project Representative and Inspectors as Members of the Construction Team
36(1)
Lines of Authority on Construction Projects
36(3)
Why Have an Inspector?
39(2)
Authority and Responsibility of the Resident Project Representative
41(10)
Problems
51(1)
Resident Project Representative Office Responsibilities
52(25)
Setting up a Field Office
52(2)
Familiarization with Construction Documents
54(1)
Equipping the Field Office
55(2)
Establishment of Communications
57(4)
Handling Job-Related Information
61(2)
Staffing Responsibilities
63(3)
Derivation of the Field Cost Indexes (FCIs)
66(1)
Selection of Trailer-Type Field Offices
67(2)
Construction Safety
69(2)
Development of an Inspection Plan
71(1)
Other Job Responsibilities
72(3)
RFIs (Requests for Information)
75(1)
Problems
76(1)
Documentation: Records and Reports
77(46)
Project Documentation as Evidence in Claims
78(1)
Files and Records
79(9)
Construction Progress Record
88(1)
Electronic Record Keeping
88(1)
Construction Reports
89(3)
Construction Diary
92(3)
Who Should Maintain Diaries and Daily Reports?
95(1)
Documentation of Intermittent Inspection
95(1)
Special Feedback Reports
95(6)
Documentation of Dangerous Safety Hazard Warnings
101(2)
Miscellaneous Records
103(1)
Labor Standards Review Records
104(2)
Job Conferences
106(1)
Contractor Submittals
106(1)
Construction Photographs
107(7)
Photographic Equipment and Materials
114(7)
Digital Cameras for Construction
121(1)
Problems
122(1)
Electronic Project Administration
123(23)
Using Computers for Project Administration
124(15)
Web-Enabled Project Management Applications
139(5)
Problems
144(2)
Specifications and Drawings
146(32)
What Is a Specification?
146(1)
Conflicts Due to Drawings and Specifications
147(3)
Unenforceable Phrases
150(1)
Content and Component Parts of a Specification
151(4)
What Do the Specifications Mean to the Inspector?
155(1)
CSI Specifications Format---Its Meaning and Importance
156(6)
Heavy Construction Engineering Specification Format
162(1)
State Highway Department Formats
163(6)
Other Nonstandard Construction Specifications Formats in Use
169(1)
Project Specifications (Project Manual) versus Special Provisions Concept
170(2)
Inspector Training and Knowledge of Specifications
172(3)
Allowances and Tolerances in Specifications
175(1)
Problems
176(2)
Using the Specifications in Contract Administration
178(34)
General Conditions of the Construction Contract
178(2)
International Construction Contracts
180(4)
Differing Site Conditions
184(4)
Materials and Equipment
188(1)
The Contractor and Subcontractors
188(1)
Shop Drawings and Samples
189(3)
Disapproving or Stopping the Work
192(2)
Supplementary General Conditions
194(1)
Technical Provisions of the Specifications
194(3)
Addenda to the Specifications
197(2)
Standard Specifications
199(1)
Master Specifications (Guide Specifications)
200(1)
Special Material and Product Standards
201(6)
Building Codes, Regulations, Ordinances, and Permits
207(2)
Types of Drawings Comprising the Construction Contract
209(1)
Order of Precedence of the Contract Documents
210(1)
Problems
211(1)
Construction Laws and Labor Relations
212(18)
Compliance with Laws and Regulations
212(2)
Public versus Private Contracts
214(1)
Traffic Requirements during Construction
215(1)
Code Enforcement Agency Requirements
216(1)
Work within or Adjacent to Navigable Waterways
217(2)
Fair Subcontracting Laws
219(1)
The Hazardous Waste Problem
219(1)
Federal Labor Laws
220(5)
Labor Relations
225(2)
Prejob Labor Agreements
227(2)
Problems
229(1)
Construction Safety
230(17)
OSHA and Construction Safety
231(2)
General Responsibility for Construction Safety
233(1)
Owner Participation in the Safety Program
233(1)
Typical Federal, State, and Utility Company Approach
234(1)
Safety Responsibility under Construction Management and Turnkey Contracts
235(3)
Effect of Including Contractor's Safety Obligations in the Specifications
238(2)
Applicability of State and Federal OSHA Provisions to a Project
240(1)
Special Applications
240(1)
Procedural Guidelines
241(2)
Shoring and Bracing
243(2)
The Competent Person
245(1)
Safety Requirements in Construction Contracts
245(1)
Problems
246(1)
Meetings and Negotiations
247(21)
Types of Meetings in Construction
247(2)
Meeting Resources
249(1)
Handling Yourself at a Meeting
250(3)
Preconstruction Conference
253(6)
Principles of Negotiation
259(3)
Techniques of Negotiation
262(4)
Problems
266(2)
Risk Allocation and Liability Sharing
268(18)
Risk Management
270(1)
Identification and Nature of Construction Risks
271(1)
Contractual Allocation of Risk
272(2)
Who Should Accept What Risks?
274(1)
Types of Risks and Allocation of Those Risks
274(7)
Minimizing Risks and Mitigating Losses
281(4)
Problems
285(1)
Preconstruction Operations
286(47)
Description of Approach
286(1)
Constructability Analysis
287(1)
Advertise and Award Phase
288(2)
Issuance of Bidding Documents
290(3)
Prequalification of Bidders
293(1)
Bonds
293(3)
Liability Forms of Insurance
296(1)
Property Forms of Insurance
297(5)
Opening, Acceptance, and Documentation of Bids
302(4)
Development of a Quality Control or Assurance Program
306(2)
Inspection and Testing Manual
308(2)
Field Office Organization of the Owner or the Field Representative
310(7)
The Preconstruction Conference
317(6)
Study Plans and Specifications
323(1)
Key Dates
323(1)
Listing of Emergency Information
323(2)
Agency Permits
325(1)
Starting a Project
325(6)
Problems
331(2)
Planning for Construction
333(25)
Construction Schedules as Related to Building Costs
337(1)
Scheduling Methods
337(3)
Bar Charts
340(2)
S-Curve Scheduling or Velocity Diagrams
342(2)
Line-of-Balance Charts
344(2)
Network Diagrams
346(3)
Specifying CPM for a Project
349(1)
Computerized Progress Payments
349(5)
Selection of PC Scheduling Software
354(3)
Problems
357(1)
CPM Scheduling For Construction
358(32)
CPM: What It Is and What It Does
359(1)
Basic Procedure in Setting Up a CPM Schedule
360(1)
Project Planning
361(1)
Fundamentals of CPM
362(7)
Who Owns Float?
369(2)
Precedence Diagraming versus i-j Diagraming
371(2)
Comparison of Precedence and Arrow Diagraming
373(1)
Precedence Formats
373(2)
Reading a Manual CPM Network Schedule
375(4)
Reading a Computerized CPM Network Schedule
379(10)
Problems
389(1)
Construction Operations
390(17)
Authority and Responsibility of All Parties
391(4)
Temporary Facilities Provided by the Contractor
395(1)
Time of Inspection and Tests
396(1)
Contractor Submittals
397(1)
Opening a Project
398(1)
Job Philosophy
399(2)
Administrative Activities
401(1)
Suspension or Termination of the Work
402(2)
Construction Services Cost Monitoring
404(2)
Problems
406(1)
Value Engineering
407(13)
Definition
412(1)
The Role of the Resident Project Representative
413(1)
Fundamentals of Value Engineering
413(2)
Areas of Opportunity for Value Engineering
415(3)
Field Responsibility in Value Engineering
418(1)
Problems
419(1)
Measurement and Payment
420(54)
Contracts for Construction
420(3)
Construction Progress Payments
423(1)
Approval of Payment Requests
423(3)
Basis for Payment Amounts
426(5)
Evaluation of Contractor's Payment Requests
431(2)
Force Account
433(4)
Payment for Extra Work and Change Orders
437(6)
Payment for Mobilization Costs
443(6)
Partial Payments to the Contractor
449(3)
Retainage
452(4)
Liquidated Damages during Construction
456(1)
Standard Contract Provisions for Measurement and Payment
456(1)
Interpreting the Contractor's Bid
457(7)
Measurement for Payment
464(3)
Measurement Guidelines for Determination of Unit-Price Pay Quantities
467(3)
Final Payment to the Contractor
470(3)
Problems
473(1)
Construction Materials and Workmanship
474(25)
Materials and Methods of Construction
475(1)
Requests for Substitutions of Materials
476(4)
Access to the Work by Quality Assurance Personnel
480(1)
Inspection of Materials Delivered to the Site
481(2)
Rejection of Faulty Material
483(2)
Construction Equipment and Methods
485(2)
Quality Level and Quality Assurance
487(1)
Quality Assurance Provisions
488(8)
Ownership of Materials
496(1)
Delivery and Storage of Materials
497(1)
Handling of Materials
497(1)
Problems
497(2)
Changes and Extra Work
499(22)
Contract Modifications
499(1)
Changes in the Work
500(6)
Types of Changes
506(4)
Elements of a Change Order
510(2)
Evaluating the Need
512(1)
Considerations for Evaluation
512(1)
Change Orders for Differing Site Conditions
513(3)
Starting the Change Order Process
516(3)
Cost of Delays Caused by Change Orders
519(1)
Problems
520(1)
Claims and Disputes
521(56)
Five Principles of Contract Administration
521(2)
Construction Problems
523(1)
Protests
523(4)
Claims
527(2)
Claims and Disputes
529(3)
Differences between the Parties
532(4)
Home Office Overhead
536(8)
Scheduling Changes
544(1)
Constructive Changes
545(1)
Other Causes of Claims and Disputes
546(10)
Resolving Differences
556(2)
Preparations for Claims Defense
558(5)
The Use of Project Records in Litigation
563(1)
Order of Precedence of Contract Documents
564(2)
Obligations of the Contractor
566(1)
Alternative Methods for Dispute Resolution
567(1)
Arbitration or Litigation?
567(3)
The Mediation Process
570(2)
Settlement of Disputes by Arbitration
572(4)
Preliminary Notice of Potential Claim
576(1)
Problems
576(1)
Project Closeout
577(38)
Acceptance of the Work
577(1)
Guarantee Period
578(1)
Contract Time
579(2)
Liquidated Damages for Delay
581(4)
Cleanup
585(1)
The Punch List
585(6)
Preparations for Closeout
591(7)
Completion versus Substantial Completion
598(4)
Substantial Completion versus Beneficial Occupancy or Use
602(2)
Beneficial Use/Partial Utilization
604(4)
Liens and Stop Orders
608(3)
Final Payment and Waiver of Liens
611(1)
Stop Notice Release Bond
611(2)
Post Completion
613(1)
Problems
613(2)
Bibliography 615(6)
Index 621(14)
Forms Index 635

Excerpts

The principal objective of this book is to provide those of us who are active in the construction industry with a single source of information that will help address the responsibilities and risks that we are likely to encounter. The book not only introduces students, design professionals, project managers, and owners to the special problems of construction, but also serves as a ready reference to experienced contract administrators and construction engineers as well. The first edition was addressed to students of construction management, on-site representatives, engineers, and inspectors to provide them with a ready source of information in preparing for the responsibilities they could expect to confront on modern construction projects. However, during the many seminars held by the author throughout the United States, Guam, Canada, Jamaica, and Mexico, and in the courses he teaches for the University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Transportation Studies; University of Washington, Seattle, Engineering Professional Programs; and the American Society of Civil Engineers, it became evident that the project managers, contract administrators, and other management personnel who worked with or exercised control over the on-site project representatives had special problems that also needed to be addressed if the project team concept was to be realized. Thus, the concept for the second edition was born: to bring together the office and field personnel and present them with a workable system for operating as an effective construction team. The third edition continued the concept of developing the project team approach, with the added consideration of claims avoidance methods to reduce claims losses. Each member of the project team needed to become intimately familiar with the principles of construction project administration. It was toward this end that the author strove to meet the particular needs of the project team in today's changing construction environment. A considerable amount of new material was added, and some of the chapters were reorganized for a more logical flow of information. Later editions provided the updating necessary to remain current with state-of-the-art techniques in construction and to add new material, including references to AIA, EJCDC, and FIDIC documents, so that the book can literally become a single source for most construction-phase activities. As a part of the continuing effort to stay abreast of the state of the art of the construction industry, and in recognition of the federal declaration to make the metric system (SI) the basic system of measurement in the United States and that federal agencies be required to use it exclusively, the fifth edition was updated to emphasize its-use and included supplementary information to assist civil and construction engineers in utilizing metric (SI) civil engineering units in construction. In addition, all of the original material was reviewed and updated, the subject of partnering was addressed, and the index was made more user friendly. The author is grateful to the many contributions made through the years since this book was first published. Contributors to previous editions included Julius (Jim) Calhoun, Esq., Asst. General Counsel for Montgomery-Watson in Pasadena, CA (ret.); Gary L. McFarland, PE, and Charles H. Lawrance, PE, President and Vice-President, respectively, of Lawrance, Fisk, & McFarland, Inc., of Santa Barbara, CA; Wendell Rigby, PE, former Senior Civil Engineer of the City of Thousand Oaks, CA; Harold Good, CPPO, Procurement Manager of the City of Palm Springs, CA; Albert Rodriguez, CPCU, ARM, President, Rodriguez Consulting Group, Inc., Jacksonville, FL; Robert Rubin, Esq., PE, of Postner & Rubin, Attorneys at Law, New York, NY; Joseph Litvin, Esq., PE, Attorney at Law, Dayton, OH; Arthur Schwartz, Esq., General Counsel for the National Society of Professional Engineers, Alexandria, VA; Robert Sm


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