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Constructive Guidance and Discipline: Preschool and Primary Education,9780131512566
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Constructive Guidance and Discipline: Preschool and Primary Education

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131512566

ISBN10:
0131512560
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $73.33
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Summary

For courses in Classroom Management for Young Children, Guiding Young Children, and Managing Behaviors of Young Children.As one of the most respected texts in the field, this book provides information about helping children become happy, responsible, and productive people. Using the recommendations and research of Jean Piaget, Alfred Adler, and Carl Rogers, the author's share their personal convictions about what is best for young children, rather than merely presenting an impartial overview of various approaches. The book provides a clear understanding of childhood development and developmentally appropriate practices as they relate to the causes of children's behavior.

Table of Contents

PART 1 Discipline Foundations
3(68)
Thinking About Guidance and Discipline
4(18)
Defining Discipline
5(2)
High Stakes
6(1)
The Goals of Discipline
7(3)
Long-Term Goals
7(1)
Self-Concept and Self-Esteem
7(1)
Self-Discipline
7(1)
Moral Autonomy
8(1)
Long-Term versus Quick-Fix Solutions
9(1)
Discipline Models Compared
10(10)
Discipline Theory Terms
10(2)
Discipline Goals Compared
12(1)
Differences in Discipline Forms
12(1)
Differences in Results
13(1)
Family Concern: Shouldn't They Learn to Obey?
13(1)
Teaching for Moral Autonomy: The Constructivist Approach
13(1)
Mutual Respect
14(1)
Helping Children Understand
14(2)
Guiding Choices
16(1)
Treating the Cause Rather than the Symptom
17(1)
Observing to Discover the Cause
17(3)
Conclusion
20(1)
For Further Thought
21(1)
Recommended Readings
21(1)
Physical and Emotional Development Affect Child Behavior
22(24)
Related Physical Development Issues
23(3)
Need to Move Around
23(1)
Small-Muscle Coordination Takes Time
24(1)
Needs for Food and Rest
25(1)
Emotional Development and Guidance
26(17)
Temperament
27(2)
Developmental Stages
29(8)
Trust versus Mistrust
Autonomy versus Shame
Initiative versus Guilt
Industry versus Inferiority
Families and Attachment
37(1)
Teachers and Attachment
38(1)
Human Needs
38(2)
Power
Attention
Acceptance
Motives of Misbehavior
40(1)
Emotion Regulation
41(1)
Behavior Problems
Helping Children Develop Emotional Competence
42(1)
Conclusion
43(1)
For Further Thought
44(1)
Recommended Readings
45(1)
Intellectual and Social Development Affect Discipline
46(25)
Intellectual Development and Behavior
47(7)
Young Children's Thinking Is Different
48(1)
Breaking Rules
48(2)
Being Selfish
50(1)
Lying and Stealing
51(1)
Schoolwork Problems
52(2)
Social Skills and Guidance
54(11)
Constructing Knowledge for Social Skills
55(1)
How Children Develop Social Competence
56(1)
Learning How to Enter Play
57(3)
Encouraging Friendships
60(1)
Learning Perspective-Taking
60(2)
Learning Conflict Resolution
62(1)
The Teacher as Coach
63(1)
Issues to Discuss with Families
64(1)
Accommodating Individual Differences
65(3)
Cultural Differences
65(2)
Socioeconomic Differences
67(1)
Gender and Brain Development
67(1)
Conclusion
68(1)
For Further Thought
69(1)
Recommended Readings
69(2)
PART 2 Discipline Approaches
71(148)
Creating Environments That Prevent Discipline Problems
72(26)
The Emotional Environment
73(17)
Relationships
73(3)
Teacher-Child Relationships
Children's Relationships with Peers
Family-School Relationships
Mutual Respect
76(2)
Respectful Communication
Respecting Children's Needs
Respecting Differences
78(3)
Including Children with Special Needs
Children's Emotional Needs
81(6)
Friendship
Recognition
Success
Choice
Positive Teacher Expectations
87(1)
Clear Guidelines
88(2)
Class Meetings
The Physical Environment
90(6)
Analyzing for Consistency
91(2)
Studying Traffic Patterns
93(1)
Allowing for Movement
93(2)
Providing for Privacy
95(1)
Conclusion
96(1)
For Further Thought
96(1)
Recommended Readings
97(1)
Planning Programs That Prevent Discipline Problems
98(24)
Making Learning Meaningful
99(12)
Relevance and Interest
99(2)
Integrated Curriculum
101(3)
Real Experiences and Real Materials
104(2)
Active Learning
106(1)
The Role of Play
107(1)
Using Time Wisely
108(1)
Three Kinds of Knowledge
109(2)
Organizational Strategies
111(8)
Routines
111(1)
Making Transitions
112(3)
Group Time
115(2)
Waiting a Turn
117(1)
Family Involvement
118(1)
Conclusion
119(1)
For Further Thought
119(1)
Recommended Readings
120(2)
Teaching Desirable Behavior Through Example
122(22)
Interaction Style
123(1)
Expressing Feelings
124(2)
Letting It Show
124(1)
Apologizing
125(1)
Children's Literature
126(1)
Accepting Feelings
126(4)
Use Your Words
127(1)
Acknowledging and Listening
128(1)
Gender and Emotions
129(1)
Cultural Differences
129(1)
Caring for Others
130(3)
Modeling Acceptance
130(1)
Modeling Kindness
131(2)
Taking Risks
133(2)
Why Bother?
133(1)
How to Do It?
133(1)
Relation to Academics
134(1)
Taking Responsibility
135(3)
Helping with Clean-up
135(1)
Keeping Your Promises
136(1)
Independent Use of Materials
137(1)
Following the Rules
138(1)
Keeping Safe
138(1)
Effective Role Models
139(1)
Someone Similar
139(1)
Someone to Be Like
139(1)
Models of Violence
140(2)
Working with Families to Combat Media Violence
141(1)
Curriculum Programs That Provide Examples
142(1)
Conclusion
142(1)
For Further Thought
143(1)
Recommended Readings
143(1)
Effective Discipline Through Effective Communication
144(22)
Why Children Don't Listen
145(3)
Criticizing and Lecturing
146(1)
Giving Orders
146(1)
Inauthentic Communication
147(1)
Talking to Children Respectfully
148(3)
Relationships
149(1)
Misconceptions
150(1)
Effectiveness
150(1)
Teaching Children to Use ``I Messages''
151(1)
Being a Good Listener
151(12)
Not Listening
152(1)
Talking Instead of Listening
152(1)
Passive Listening
153(1)
Reflective Listening
153(1)
Cautions about Reflective Listening
154(2)
Feeling Awkward or Phony
Children's Communication
Helping Children Resolve Conflicts
156(1)
Consistency in Schools
157(1)
Everyone Wins
157(1)
Conflict Resolution Programs
158(1)
Identifying the Problem
158(1)
Brainstorming Solutions
159(1)
Evaluating Solutions and Making a Choice
160(1)
Implementing the Plan
160(1)
Evaluating the Plan
161(1)
Saving Time
161(1)
Independent Problem Solvers
161(2)
Family and Community
163(1)
Conclusion
164(1)
For Further Thought
164(1)
Recommended Readings
165(1)
Helping Children Understand and Accept Limits
166(18)
Natural Consequences
168(2)
Avoiding Overprotection
169(1)
The Inevitable Does Happen
170(1)
Related Consequences
170(3)
Reciprocity
171(1)
Exclusion
171(1)
Deprivation
172(1)
Restitution
172(1)
Combining with Other Teaching
173(1)
Consequences or Punishment?
173(2)
Use Consequences with Caution
174(1)
Plan Ahead
174(1)
Watch Your Attitude
175(1)
Selecting Reasonable Consequences
175(3)
Clear Teaching Goals
176(1)
Careful Thought
177(1)
Clear Relationships
178(1)
Using Consequences
178(4)
Family Situations as a Model
180(1)
Allowing Consequences to Happen
180(1)
Helping Children Make Connections
181(1)
Combining Approaches
182(1)
Conclusion
182(1)
For Further Thought
183(1)
Recommended Readings
183(1)
Controlling Behavior Externally
184(20)
Behavior Modification
185(4)
Don't Let It Backfire
185(2)
Reinforcement Theory
187(2)
Rewards
Punishment
Reinforcement Schedules
Is Behavior Modification the Approach for You?
189(4)
Autonomy Destroyed
189(1)
Self-Discipline Limited
190(1)
Performance Decreased
190(1)
Ignores Cause of Problems
191(1)
Relationships Damaged
192(1)
Intrinsic Motivation Destroyed
192(1)
Necessary Motivation
193(1)
Common Forms of Behavior Modification
194(7)
Rewards and Punishment
194(1)
Time-Out
195(2)
Assertive Discipline
197(1)
Praise: A Verbal Reward
198(2)
Giving Encouragement Instead
200(1)
Encouragement as Effective Communication
201(1)
Conclusion
201(1)
For Further Thought
202(1)
Recommended Readings
202(2)
Punishment Versus Discipline
204(15)
Results of Punishment
205(7)
Anger and Aggression
205(2)
Damaged Relationships
207(1)
Damage to Self-Esteem
207(2)
Fear
209(1)
Missed Opportunity for Learning
209(1)
Lack of Critical Thinking
210(1)
Lack of Inner Controls
211(1)
Deceitfulness
211(1)
Why Punishment Is Used
212(1)
Adult Stress
212(4)
Misconceptions
213(1)
Lack of Discipline Skills
214(1)
Family and Societal Norms
215(1)
Conclusion
216(1)
For Further Thought
216(1)
Recommended Readings
217(2)
PART 3 Matching Discipline Causes to Discipline Approaches
219(111)
Immaturity
220(22)
Physical Immaturity
221(6)
Inability to Sit Still
221(2)
Immature Coordination
223(2)
Other Physical Limitations
225(2)
Undeveloped Communication Ability
227(1)
Undeveloped Emotion Regulation
228(3)
Coaching Emotion Regulation
228(2)
Emotion Regulation Curriculum
230(1)
Undeveloped Social Skills
231(3)
Egocentrism
234(3)
Other Immature Perceptions
237(2)
Lying
237(1)
Stealing
238(1)
Cheating
238(1)
Family Involvement
239(1)
Conclusion
239(1)
For Further Thought
240(1)
Recommended Readings
240(2)
Unmet Needs
242(18)
Differing Needs
243(1)
Privacy Needs
244(1)
Power Needs
245(2)
Ownership Needs
247(1)
Attention Needs
247(3)
Needs for Success and Challenge
250(1)
Need for Security
251(3)
Predictability
251(3)
Starting School
Predictable Limits
Teacher Continuity
Need for Love and Acceptance
254(4)
Family Histories
254(1)
Teacher Attachment
254(1)
Reasonable Expectations
255(2)
Changing Attitudes
Peer Acceptance
257(1)
Conclusion
258(1)
For Further Thought
258(1)
Recommended Readings
259(1)
Children Experiencing Disabilities
260(28)
Eileen Hughes
Philosophy and Values
262(2)
The Social Environment
264(15)
Peer Interaction
264(1)
Perspective-Taking
265(3)
Recognition and Strengths
268(2)
Friendship
270(3)
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
273(1)
Resistant Behaviors
273(1)
The Physical Setting
274(1)
Seating Arrangements
275(2)
Organization, Activity Areas, and Material Selection
277(2)
Organizational Strategies
279(1)
Routines
279(1)
Transitions
279(1)
Rules and Limits
280(2)
Classroom Instructions
280(2)
Teacher Collaboration
282(2)
Relationships with Families
284(1)
Conclusion
285(1)
For Further Thought
285(1)
Recommended Readings
286(2)
Special Emotional Needs
288(24)
Lory Britain
Sierra Freeman
Risk Factors
290(1)
The Effect of Experience on the Developing Brain
290(1)
Behaviors
290(1)
Observations
291(2)
Therapeutic Approach: Strategies and Techniques
293(1)
Classroom Culture
293(13)
Principle One
294(3)
Principle Two
297(1)
Principle Three
298(3)
Principle Four
301(2)
Principle Five
303(3)
Principle Six
306(1)
Expanding the Teacher Role
306(3)
Referrals and Teaming with Specialists
307(1)
Reporting
308(1)
Supervision, Professional Support and Development, and Self-Care
308(1)
Conclusion
309(1)
For Further Thought
309(1)
Recommended Readings
310(2)
Analyzing Discipline Problems
312(18)
Keeping Goals in Mind
313(1)
Finding the Cause of the Problem
313(8)
Age-Typical Behavior
315(1)
Inappropriate Adult Expectations
315(1)
Missing Skills
316(1)
Lack of Understanding
317(1)
Mislearning
317(1)
Unmet Emotional Needs
318(1)
Serious Problems
319(1)
Family Communication and Complexity of Causes
319(2)
Matching Discipline Approaches to the Cause
321(1)
An Example
321(1)
Safety First
322(1)
Evaluating Guidance Programs
322(1)
Whose Problem Is It?
323(3)
Your Problem
324(1)
Solutions to Your Problem
324(1)
The Child's Problem
325(1)
Mutual Problems
326(1)
Taking Time For Discipline
326(2)
Time for Children to Learn
326(1)
Time for Cool-Downs
327(1)
Time for Adults to Plan
327(1)
Families and Respect for Children
328(1)
Conclusion
329(1)
For Further Thought
329(1)
Recommended Readings
329(1)
Appendix A Action Guide for Media Violence and Children 330(5)
Appendix B Curriculum Guidelines from the National Association for the Education of Young Children 335(5)
Appendix C NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment 340(5)
Appendix D Three Subtypes of ADHD 345(2)
References 347(13)
Author Index 360(3)
Subject Index 363


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