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Contemporary Sociological Theory : Expanding the Classical Tradition,9780131850514
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Contemporary Sociological Theory : Expanding the Classical Tradition

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131850514

ISBN10:
0131850512
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/8/2005
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $123.00

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Summary

This book examines the assumptions and concepts of the five major sociological theories and the classical roots of the modern theories. It focuses specifically on functionalism, conflict theory, theories of rational choice, symbolic interactionism, and phenomenology. Focusing on writers whose work has most influenced social theory, this book explores the key concepts of each theory, the background of the major theorists, empirical applications, and everyday "lay" use of each perspective. The book also features examples of research based on actual theory, direct quotations from major theorists, and feminist contributions and critiques on each major perspective. The sixth edition of Contemporary Sociological Theory: Continuing the Classical Traditionhas been revised to include updated research examples that were theoretically driven. An essential reference for every professional whose work is related to sociology.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
The Understanding of Society
1(14)
The Structure of Sociological Theory
3(10)
Subject Matter
5(1)
Assumptions
6(2)
Methodology
8(3)
Objectives
11(2)
Theory and Understanding: The Examples of Formal Education and the Role of Women in Contemporary Society
13(2)
Functionalism
15(52)
Introduction
16(2)
Functionalism Defined
17(1)
Intellectual Roots: Emile Durkheim and His Forerunners
18(7)
Emile Durkheim
19(6)
Part One: Talcott Parsons: Grand Theory
25(1)
Background
25(1)
Parsons's System Levels
26(2)
Parsons's Theory of Action
28(1)
The Pattern Variables
29(6)
The Functional System Problems---AGIL
35(10)
AGIL and Equilibrium
41(4)
Part Two: Robert K. Merton: Middle-Range Theory
45(1)
Background
45(1)
Theories of the Middle Range
46(1)
Clarifying Functional Analysis
47(8)
Dysfunctions
48(3)
Manifest and Latent Functions
51(1)
Functional Alternatives
52(3)
Merton's Theory of Deviance
55(2)
Part Three: Neofunctionalism
57(1)
Jeffrey C. Alexander
58(1)
Neil J. Smelser
59(2)
Niklas Luhmann
61(3)
Conclusion
64(3)
Conflict Theory
67(91)
Introduction: The Two Traditions
68(2)
The Two Traditions
69(1)
Intellectual Roots
70(8)
Power, Position, and Legitimacy: Marx and Weber
70(5)
Power, Elites, and Classes
75(1)
The Web of Conflict: Simmel and the Chicago School
76(2)
Summary
78(1)
Part One: Conflict Theory and the Critique of Society
78(2)
Marxist and Neo-Marxist Sociology
80(21)
The Economic Basis of Society
81(1)
Class and the Economic Base of Conflict
82(5)
Culture, Ideology, and Alienation
87(6)
Class, Society, and the State
93(6)
Marxist Analysis: An Assessment
99(2)
Critical Theory: The Frankfurt School
101(6)
Critical Theory and the Nature of Social Science
102(5)
C. Wright Mills
107(4)
The Sociological Imagination
107(1)
Alienation and Bureaucracy
108(1)
The Power Elite
109(2)
Pierre Bourdieu
111(9)
Reproduction and Habitus
114(4)
Conclusion
118(2)
Part Two: Conflict Theory and Analytic Sociology: The Legacy of Max Weber
120(1)
Ralf Dahrendorf
121(9)
Power, Conflict, and Social Explanation
122(2)
The Determinants of Conflict: A Theory of Conflict Groups
124(6)
Summary
130(1)
Lewis Coser
130(8)
The Origins and Functions of Social Conflict
132(3)
Divisive Social Conflict
135(3)
Summary
138(1)
Randall Collins
138(17)
The Nature of Conflict Sociology
139(2)
Social Institutions and the Balance of Resources
141(9)
Culture, Ideology, and Legitimation
150(3)
Military Force and Geopolitics
153(2)
Summary
155(1)
Conclusion
155(3)
Evolution and Modernity: Macrosociological Perspectives
158(39)
Introduction
159(1)
Intellectual Roots
160(2)
Part One: Karl Marx and the Classless Society
162(1)
The End of Capitalism
163(5)
World Systems Theory
165(3)
Part Two: Talcott Parsons's Evolutionary Model
168(6)
Evolutionary Universals
169(5)
Part Three: Jurgen Habermas: Rationalization and Communicative Action
174(12)
Evolution and Crisis
176(4)
Rationalization of the Lifeworld
180(1)
Lifeworld and System
181(2)
Reason and Rationalization
183(3)
Part Four: Anthony Giddens: Structuration Theory, High Modernity, and Globalization
186(9)
Social Structure
188(2)
High Modernity and Globalization
190(5)
Conclusion
195(2)
Symbolic Interactionism
197(64)
Introduction
198(1)
Intellectual Roots: Max Weber and Georg Simmel
199(5)
Part One: George Herbert Mead: The Self
204(1)
The Self
205(2)
Self-Interaction
207(2)
The Development of the Self
209(2)
Symbolic Meaning
211(2)
Part Two: Herbert Blumer: Interpretation and Methodology
213(1)
Interpretation
214(3)
The Three Basic Premises
217(3)
Structure and Process
220(5)
Methodology
225(10)
Inductive Approach
226(2)
Modes of Inquiry
228(6)
Microsociology
234(1)
Part Three: Erving Goffman: Dramaturgy and the Interaction Order
235(1)
Background
235(3)
Dramaturgy and Everyday Life
238(6)
The Interaction Order
244(3)
Part Four: Arlie Russell Hochschild and Patricia Hill Collins: Expanding the Horizons of Symbolic Interactionism
247(1)
Background
248(2)
Arlie Russell Hochschild: Emotional Labor
250(3)
Other Contributions to Sociology of Emotions
253(2)
Patricia Hill Collins: Black Feminist Thought
255(4)
Conclusion
259(2)
Phenomenology
261(41)
Introduction
262(1)
Intellectual Roots: Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz
263(4)
Part One: Harold Garfinkel: The Founder of Ethnomethodology
267(1)
Background
268(1)
Ethnomethodology Defined
269(4)
Accounting
273(3)
Doing Ethnomethodology
276(4)
Methodological Comparison
280(5)
Part Two: Peter Berger: The Social Construction of Reality
285(1)
Background
285(1)
Key Concepts
285(7)
Externalization
287(1)
Objectivation
288(1)
Internalization
289(3)
Part Three: Dorothy E. Smith: Feminist Standpoint Theory
292(1)
Background
292(1)
Standpoint Theory Defined
293(4)
Methodological Implications
297(3)
Conclusion
300(2)
Theories of Rational Choice
302(79)
Introduction
303(2)
Intellectual Roots
305(8)
Anthropology and the Importance of the Gift
306(2)
Economics, Profit, and Price
308(3)
Behaviorist Psychology and the Theory of Games
311(2)
Part One: Rational Choice, Social Exchange, and Individual Behavior
313(1)
George Homans: Elementary Social Behavior
313(13)
The Principles of Rationality
316(5)
The Deprivation-Satiation Proposition
321(1)
Aggression and Approval
321(5)
Power, Equity, and Games
326(12)
Power
326(3)
Equity and Affect: The ``Social'' Max
329(2)
Games Theory and the Prisoner's Dilemma
331(7)
Part Two: Rational Choice and the Analysis of Social Structure
338(1)
Peter Blau: Exchange and Social Integration
338(10)
The Distinctive Nature of Social Exchange
340(5)
Exchange and Power
345(3)
Norms and Networks
348(15)
Collective Action and the Problem of ``Free Riders''
349(9)
Networks and Emergent Processes
358(5)
Part Three: James Coleman and the Foundations of Social Theory
363(1)
Coalitions, Trust, and Norms
364(8)
Coalition Building
364(2)
Trust and the Formation of Group Norms
366(6)
Social Capital
372(4)
Natural Persons and Corporate Actors
375(1)
Conclusion
376(5)
Rediscovering the Body: The Sociology of the Body and Sociobiology
381(34)
Introduction
382(1)
Part One: The Sociology of the Body
383(14)
Representing the Body
384(5)
Mental Illness: Real or Constructed?
389(2)
Regulating Populations and Bodies
391(6)
Part Two: Sociobiology
397(4)
Selfish Genes and Kin Selection
401(8)
Trust and Altruism
405(2)
Reproductive Strategies: Who Is Cheating Whom?
407(2)
Sociobiology and Culture
409(6)
Biology and Culture
411(2)
Biology and Sociology
413(2)
Conclusion: Evaluating Sociological Theory
415(23)
Part One: The Future of Sociological Theory: Modernism and Postmodernism
416(1)
Introduction
416(10)
Historical Trends
417(2)
The Postmodernist Critique
419(7)
Part Two: Sociological Theory and Understanding: The Value of Multiple Perspectives
426(12)
Exploring Formal Education: The Role of the School
428(4)
Exploring the Role of Women in Contemporary Society
432(6)
Selected Bibliography 438(9)
Index 447


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