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Conversations : Readings for Writing,9780321317414

Conversations : Readings for Writing

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780321317414

ISBN10:
0321317416
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $68.00

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Summary

With more than 130 readings and 24 pages of visual arguments, Conversations offers an extraordinary variety of authors, genres, voices, and viewpoints on important contemporary civic issues. Touching on issues that affect students both as individuals and as citizens, the readings and visuals invite students to join important civic conversations" through their own writing. For each issue addressed, Conversations offers not just one or two selections, but several reminding students that no issue has just one or two sides, but usually involves a wide range of voices. Frequently, selections comment on and argue with other selections, demonstrating that writing is a social exchange, and that much writing is a response to what we read. The images included in this new edition also remind students that we regularly read interpret and respond to not only words, but visual arguments found in photographs, artworks, cartoons, advertisements, and websites.

Table of Contents

Rhetorical Contents xxxi
Preface xlvii
Introduction 1(22)
Why Write?
2(4)
How to Read this Book—And an Example
6(10)
Visual Conversations: Reading Images as Texts
16(7)
Part One Education 23(174)
Introduction
24(3)
Is Public Education Working?
27(93)
E.B. White, EDUCATION (essay)
27(2)
Which is better: an intimate, personalized rural school with limited facilities? or a larger urban school with all the modern touches?
Paul E. Peterson, A LIBERAL CASE FOR VOUCHERS (essay)
29(5)
"Given the potential of vouchers to achieve more racial and socioeconomic diversity in education...you'd think more liberals would be open to experimenting with them."
Martin Carnoy, Do SCHOOL VOUCHERS IMPROVE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE? (essay)
34(8)
A response to Paul Peterson: "It is difficult to understand the source of private-school advantage—if such an advantage even exists."
Marc Fisher, TO EACH ITS OWN (essay)
42(17)
"On paper, in a dream, a charter school—in effect a privately run public school—is a way out, an answer, an engine for change. On the street, in a kid's life, a charter school is a building with teachers, students, headaches, tragedies, and, once in a while, a moment of shining success."
W. Norton Grubb, THE NEW VOCATIONALISM: WHAT IT IS, WHAT IT COULD BE (essay)
59(14)
Should education focus upon preparing students for the workplace? This essay explores the promises and pitfalls of vocational education, with the premise that "the education needed for the workplace does not differ in its essentials from that needed for college or advanced technical training."
Larry Cuban, MAKING PUBLIC SCHOOLS BUSINESS-LIKE...AGAIN (essay)
73(8)
"The problem begins," this essay suggests, "when public school critics link test scores to worker productivity and the national economy."
Thomas Toch, DIVIDE AND CONQUER: HOW BREAKING UP BIG HIGH SCHOOLS CAN BE THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL EDUCATION REFORM (essay)
81(13)
This essay explores "a movement among school reformers who argue that size is the enemy of excellence in America's high schools and breaking up super-sized schools into smaller units is the key to improving them."
Alexander Russo, WHEN SCHOOL CHOICE ISN'T (essay)
94(7)
There has been much debate over whether allowing parents to choose the type of school that their children attend is a good thing. But "here's the catch": In some communities, "there is no better school."
Rachel S. Cox, HOME SCHOOLING DEBATE: IS THE MOVEMENT UNDERMINING PUBLIC EDUCATION? (essay)
101(19)
For an increasing number of American families, home schooling has become the method of educating their children, but others fear that this movement can damage the "role of public education as the great equalizer in a democracy."
VISUAL CONVERSATIONS 1 The Place(s) of Education: Educational Settings
115(1)
Although education is in the business of encouraging mental growth, there is no doubt that the physical spaces set aside for educating children can encourage, or impede, that growth. These images of various educational settings can help to generate dialogue on the various settings that people call "school."
What's College For?
120(47)
Alice Walker, EVERYDAY USE (fiction)
120(8)
The "child who has made it" confronts her sister who "hasn't." What's an education for?
W.T. Reeves, COLLEGE ISN'T FOR EVERYONE (essay)
128(5)
"Going to college is an utter waste of time for those students who have emerged from high school neither literate nor numerate, with cultural focuses revolving around hip-hop and body piercing and with zero interest in changing their behavior."
Garry B. Trudeau, DOONESBURY (cartoon)
133(2)
Does this cartoon offer a portrait of intellectual life at your college and university?
Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, THE CHALLENGE OF LIBERTY (essay)
135(10)
In the debate about what people want from college, the results are clear: Students are "voting with their feet for more vocationally oriented programs of study." What role can the liberal arts play in such an environment?
Ralph Ketcham, A RATIONALE FOR CIVIC EDUCATION (essay)
145(7)
"Consider the foolish optimism of supposing that all is well in a democratic society when no one is expected or encouraged to achieve" a "public-spirited posture."
ADS FOR HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY AND BETON HALL UNIVERSITY (advertisements)
152(2)
What's college for? What's the meaning of success? These ads imply some answers.
John Searle, THE CASE FOR A TRADITIONAL LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION (essay)
154(13)
"This generation of radicals doesn't want to take over the country, they want to take over the English Department."
What Does It Mean to Be Literate?
167(30)
Benjamin Franklin, from THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN (memoir)
167(4)
The quintessential American coming-of-age story is in part a story of gathering literacy.
Frederick Douglass, from THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS(slave narrative)
171(5)
One of the most famous nineteenth-century orators and essayists recounts the thrilling—and dangerous—story of his learning to read and write.
Andy Carvin, MIND THE GAP: THE DIGITAL DIVIDE AS THE CIVIL RIGHTS ISSUE OF THE NEW MILLENIUM (essay)
176(5)
The so-called "digital divide" between the haves and the have-nots in access to information literacy is one of "the most important civil rights issues facing our modern information economy."
Solveig singleton and Lucas Mast, HOW DOES THE EMPTY GLASS FILL: A MODERN PHILOSOPHY OF THE DIGITAL DIVIDE (essay)
181(8)
"The fuss about the `digital divide' is a testament to the power of the human mind to take an ordinary problem and magically transform it into a crisis threatening the future of our nation."
Paul Gorski, UNDERSTANDING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE FROM A MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION FRAMEWORK (essay)
189(13)
"A new understanding of the digital divide is needed—one that provides adequate context and begins with a dedication to equity and social justice throughout education."
Part Two Media Matters 197(134)
Introduction
198(4)
Big Media: Who Owns the News?
202(49)
Robert W. McChesney and Eric Alterman, WAGING THE MEDIA BATTLE (essay)
202(8)
"The first myth is that the existing profit-driven U.S. media system is the American way, and that there is nothing we can do about it."
Dell Champlin and Janet Knoedler, OPERATING IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST OR IN PURSUIT OF PRIVATE PROFITS? NEWS IN THE AGE OF MEDIA CONSOLIDATION (essay)
210(11)
Do news divisions of media corporations have a different set of obligations than the entertainment divisions? What are the obligations of corporations and government to ensure access to a wide range of information? Questions like these face our country in an age of media consolidation.
Tom Goldstein, DOES BIG MEAN BAD? (essay)
221(4)
Though it is clear that news outlets are owned by fewer and fewer companies, need that fact automatically be a source of concern to the American citizenry? Or can larger companies deliver the news more effectively?
Ronnie Dugger, CORPORATE TAKEOVER OF THE MEDIA (essay)
225(4)
"The big-corporate domination of the media is a mortal threat to democracy. Without a freely and robustly informed people, democracy is an illusion."
Nick Gillespie, THE MYTH OF MEDIA MONOPOLY (essay)
229(1)
"There is no compelling evidence that the current level of media concentration has had negative consequences for consumers, culture, or democracy."
Pew Research Center, BOTTOM-LINE PRESSURES NOW HURTING COVERAGE, SAY JOURNALISTS (demographic study)
230(6)
A survey of journalists suggests that they believe a "decidedly ideological point of view" of news outlets is a danger to the free reporting of the news, and to the work of reporters.
Brent Cunningham, ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE: CLASS (essay)
236(15)
What obligation do news reporters have to pay attention to stories that affect those in the lowest economic brackets?
Alternative Media: A New Free Press?
251(56)
Diane Owen, EFFECTS OF ELECTRONIC MEDIA ON DEMOCRATIC ATTITUDES (essay)
251(12)
How has the emergence of electronic media as the central form of news dissemination affected the political attitudes and socialization of young citizens?
Kimberly Meltzer, Brett A. Mueller, and Russell M. Tisinger, ENGAGING THE ELECTRONIC ELECTORATE (demographic study)
263(10)
How important are alternative media in disseminating information and opinions? "On a typical day in December 2000, fifty-eight million Americans were logging on—an increase of nine million people from six months earlier."
Matt Welch, BLOGWORLD AND ITS GRAVITY (essay)
273(10)
Has the "alternative" or "underground" newspaper, which to the author seems to have itself become a conformist enterprise, been replaced by the newest form of underground reporting—the weblog?
Andrew Boyd, THE WEB REWIRES THE MOVEMENT (essay)
283(9)
Not long ago, organizing a political movement meant being there—like Martin Luther King, traveling to the physical spaces where activism required seeding. Has the web made the organization of activist movements just a few clicks away, replacing physical space with cyberspace?
Joshua Kurlantzick, DICTATORSHIP.COM (essay)
292(15)
Though the web seems to be a democratic enterprise, giving media access to many individual citizens, some worry that the power of this technology—in the wrong hands—could in fact serve the worst kind of antidemocratic actions.
VISUAL CONVERSATIONS 2 Virtual Communities, Real Politics in the New Media
303(1)
As cyberspace becomes the new public square for political discussion, powerful imageš play an increasingly large role in the persuasion that goes on there. What effect has this movement toward visual culture had upon the ways various organizations and special interest groups use the media?
Two-Way Media: Is Talk Radio Good for Democracy?
307(24)
American Demographics, OPENING UP THE CONVERSATION (demographic study)
307(6)
Who is listening to talk radio? The answer may not be as simple as some think.
Sara O'Sullivan, THE ILLUSION OF CONSUMER PARTICIPATION: THE CASE OF TALK RADIO (essay)
313(4)
Talk radio allows for a two-way conversation over the public airways—a free interchange of ideas. Or does it?
L. Brent Bozell III, TALK RADIO: MEDIA HATE "DEMOCRACY IN ACTION" (essay)
317(3)
"The mainstream media tend to portray political talk radio as powerful, pernicious, and homogeneous." But do the critics of talk radio attack this media because it challenges their preeminence?
José Márquez, TALK, RADIO AND DEMOCRACY (essay)
320(3)
"While the First Amendment protects the right to rebut claims, it does not provide for the means to do so in a public square ostensibly dominated by private soapboxes."
Thom Hartmann, TALKING BACK TO TALK RADIO: FAIRNESS, DEMOCRACY, AND PROFITS (essay)
323(13)
Because talk radio has largely been dominated by politically conservative shows, the medium seems to have little interest for liberals. Is there a place—and a need—for liberal talk radio? A liberal talk radio show host says yes.
Part Three Gender 331(112)
Introduction
332(4)
How Can Gender Be Defined?
336(45)
Sojourner Truth, AIN'T I A WOMAN (speech)
336(1)
"I have plowed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me. And ain't I a woman?"
Scott Russell Sanders, THE MEN WE CARRY IN OUR MINDS (essay)
337(4)
"I wasn't an enemy, in fact or feeling. I was an ally. If I had known, then, how to tell them so, would they have believed me?"
Susan Glaspell, TRIFLES (play)
341(12)
A murder in a small community uncovers sharp, and persistent, divisions between the sexes.
Betsy Lucal, WHAT IT MEANS TO BE GENDERED ME: LIFE ON THE BOUNDARIES OF A DICHOTOMOUS GENDER SYSTEM (essay)
353(20)
"My experiences as a woman who does not do femininity illustrate a paradox of our two-and-only-two gender system."
John Derbyshire, THE ABOLITION OF SEX (satire)
373(8)
"Presumably the next step is to allow individual men or women to legally declare themselves to be trees or turnips."
VISUAL CONVERSATIONS 3 Images of Gender in the Arts
377(1)
The visual arts have long been intrigued by defining boundaries, and the potential porousness of those boundaries. The artwork included here explores those boundaries and reminds us that much of what it means to be male and female depends upon the visual cues that we have come to associate with gender.
Is English Sexist?
381(26)
Beverly Gross, BITCH (essay)
381(9)
"What is the male equivalent of the word bitch, I asked the class. 'Boss,' said Sabrina Sims. I haven't been able to get [her answer] out of my mind."
Deborah Tannen, CROSSTALK (essay)
390(5)
A best-selling author outlines differences in the ways men and women communicate, and fail to communicate, at work.
Sherryl Kleinman, WHY SEXIST LANGUAGE MATTERS (essay)
395(6)
"It's no accident that 'man' is the anchor of our language and 'woman' is not."
David F. Sally, GENDERATOR I.I: A MODISH PROPOSAL (satire)
401(5)
"The Neuter Corporation is proud to introduce a word processing tool/utensil that will make all your gender worries vanish in the night—GENDERATOR I.I!"
"YOU'LL JUST LOVE THE WAY HE HANDLES" (cartoon)
406(1)
This New Yorker cartoon goes right to the heart of the question, "Is English sexist?"
Does Pornography Cause Harm to Women?
407(36)
President's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, MAJORITY REPORT (report)
407(5)
"Exposure to erotic stimuli appears to have little or no effect," according to the majority of these researchers.
President's Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, MINORITY REPORT (report)
412(2)
"Pornography is loveless; it degrades the human being, reduces him to the level of animal."
Susan Brownmiller, LET's PUT PORNOGRAPY BACK IN THE CLOSET (essay)
414(3)
"Pornography represents hatred of women," so it should be eliminated from our society. That's the advice of this well-known feminist.
John Irving, PORNOGRAPHY AND THE NEW PURITANS (essay)
417(9)
The author of Cider House Rules believes that "we have many new Puritans in our country today; they are as dangerous to freedom of expression as the old Puritans. Especially sad, a few are formerly liberal-thinking feminists."
Andrea Dworkin, REPLY TO JOHN IRVING (letter to the editor)
426(4)
A spirited, personal, and graphic response to John Irving that you won't soon forget.
Nadine Strossen, THE PERILS OF PORNOPHOBIA (essay)
430(5)
Not only are antipornography feminists harming the cause of women's rights by promoting a puritanical approach to sexual issues, contends an ACLU leader, but proposals for censorship are offering aid and comfort to the political right wing.
Robert Jensen, THE PAINFUL TRUTH ABOUT TODAY'S PORNOGRAPHY—AND WHAT MEN CAN DO ABOUT IT (essay)
435(13)
"This culture struggles unsuccessfully with pornography because it is also about men's cruelty to women, and about the pleasure that men sometimes take in that cruelty And that is much more difficult for everyone to face."
Part Four Revolutions in Marriage and Family 443(168)
Introduction
444(4)
What Is a Marriage?
448(51)
David Masci, IS TRADITIONAL MATRIMONY GOING OUT OF STYLE? (report)
448(12)
This essay explores the various recent challenges to the t raditional version of matrimony, and gives voice to those who fear those changes—as well as those that applaud them.
Margaret Mead, CAN MARRIAGE BE FOR LIFE? (sociological study)
460(8)
In her time, this author was one of the country's leading social scientists—and a very public one. In this piece, she explores how the growing acceptance of divorce in the 1960's and 1970's was likely to affect the institution of marriage. As you read this 35-year-old piece, you can consider how many of her predictions have come true as the divorce rate hovers at about 50 percent.
Steven L. Nock, THE PROBLEM WITH MARRIAGE (essay)
468(15)
"What is the problem with marriage? The problem is...how to deal with widespread social change in matters of gender."
Jennifer Marshall, MARRIAGE: WHAT SOCIAL SCIENCE SAYS AND DOESN'T SAY (report)
483(3)
Are experiments with non-traditional marriage, whose effects are yet to be tested, dangerous to the fabric of our culture? This report from a conservative foundation's research wing suggests that they are.
Shere Hite, BRINGING DEMOCRACY HOME (report)
486(7)
Where others see crisis in the rise of divorce and alternative families, Shere Hite sees progress for women and for the possibilities of U.S. democracy—if we are willing to nurture difference.
Gregory Corso, MARRIAGE (poem)
493(6)
This poet from the "Beat" movement satirizes the conventions of marriage and imagines the inner thoughts of a man considering whether to marry: "Should I get married? Should I be good?"
What Is a Family?
499(69)
Ellen Willis, WHY I'M NOT "PRO-FAMILY" (essay)
499(6)
Restrict divorce? Discourage single parenthood? Those questions mask the larger message of the "pro-family" camp—that women have gotten out of hand.
Claudia Wallis, THE CASE FOR STAYING AT HOME (report)
505(8)
"Caught between the pressures of the workplace and the demands of being a mom, more women are sticking with the kids."
Barbara LeBey, AMERICAN FAMILIES ARE DRIFTING APART (essay)
513(6)
Has the mobility that comes with faster technologies and faster transportation fractured families, who now find themselves scattered all around the country? Has workaholism made family life less of a priority for Americans? And can the American family survive these new social realities?
Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, DAN QUAYLE WAS RIGHT (essay)
519(29)
The evidence is clear from the social sciences—dissolution of two-parent families may benefit the adults involved, but it's harmful to children and to society.
Iris Marion Young, MAKING SINGLE MOTHERHOOD NORMAL (essay)
548(9)
There's nothing wrong with single-mother families; it's just that they are disadvantaged by economic discrimination and social stigma. So we need policies that treat single mothers as equal citizens.
Jean Bethke Elshtain, SINGLE MOTHERHOOD: A RESPONSE TO IRIS YOUNG (essay)
557(3)
"What I found most surprising in Iris Young's analysis is the radical disconnection between her policy proposals and the constraints and possibilities of our current situation."
Margaret O'Brien Steinfels, RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBLITIES: A RESPONSE TO IRIS YOUNG (essay)
560(3)
"Fully achieved, Iris Young's proposals would be a disaster for women and children [and] probably for men too...."
Iris Marion Young, RESPONSE TO ELSHTAIN AND STEINFELS (essay)
563(5)
"It is Elshtain and Steinfels who have their heads in the sand."
Will America Accept Gay Marriages and Gay Families?
568(43)
Dan Gilgoff, THE RISE OF THE GAY FAMILY (report)
568(6)
"Gay families have arrived in suburban America, in small-town America—in all corners of the country."
Rick Santorum, AMERICANS MUST PRESERVE INSTITUTION OF MARRIAGE (essay)
574(2)
A U.S. senator cautions against the legal recognition of gay marriage because it will "destroy the special legal status of marriage" in this country.
Adam Tenney, WHOSE FAMILY VALUES? (essay)
576(4)
This socialist author suggests that the term family values is an "ultra-right" attack upon the gay rights movement and a means of covering up the ways their own policies have put the American family at risk.
Ellen Goodman, SHOWING US THE POWER OF MARRIAGE (essay)
580(3)
This Pulitzer prize-winning author explores the ways in which marriage of any type is more about commitment and less about whether a couple is heterosexual or homosexual.
Barbara Findlen, IS MARRIAGE THE ANSWER? (essay)
583(6)
Since when is marriage the path to liberation? That's the question that is being debated in the gay community.
Tom Toles, THE TROUBLE WITH GAYS (cartoon)
589(1)
An ironic commentary on "the trouble with you gay people...."
Andrew Sullivan, HERE COMES THE GROOM (essay)
590(4)
"Gay marriage is not a radical step. It avoids the mess of domestic partnerships; it is humane; it is conservative in the best sense of the word."
Hadley Arkes, THE CLOSET STRAIGHT (essay)
594(7)
A conservative asks, "Why indeed should the notion of gay marriage be scaled down to fit the notions held by Andrew Sullivan?"
Anna Quindlen, EVAN'S TWO MOMS (essay)
601(2)
"A kid, a psychologist, a pediatrician. A family." A Pulitzer prize—winning writer defends gay families.
Victoria A. Brownworth, THE LIMITS OF FAMILY (essay)
603(14)
The occasion of her mother's death "by poverty...with complications from gender" leads this writer to reflect upon the awful restrictions upon love and family that result from not recognizing gay unions.
VISUAL CONVERSATIONS 4 Gay Marriage Comes Out of the Closet and into the Public Eye
606(1)
In the year 2004, the news media flooded us with images of gay couples being married in San Francisco and Massachusetts. The images in this section ask you to consider how seeing (as opposed to just reading about) gay marriage affects this important public conversation.
Part Five Civil Liberties and Civic Responsibilities 611(184)
Introduction
612(5)
Conformity and Activism: What Does Democratic Citizenship Require?
617(74)
Aristotle, from POLITICS (philosophical treatise)
617(4)
Aristotle's examination of various forms of government in Politics is in the interest of finding the state that can best suit the search for virtue. In this excerpt, he muses over the relative values and pitfalls of the democratic state.
Alexis de Tocqueville, from DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA (report)
621(10)
Though democracy is a way of life, even a given for us in the United States, for this nineteenth-century statesman, American democracy was a subject of serious sociological study. As we read this discussion of democracy from the twenty-first century, we can still gain insights about a way of life that is to us, perhaps, too close to see objectively.
Henry David Thoreau, CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE (essay)
631(15)
"Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them?"
Mahatma Gandhi, LETTER TO LORD IRWIN (letter)
646(5)
A classic statement on and illustration of the tenets of civil disobedience.
PUBLIC STATEMENT BY EIGHT ALABAMA CLERGYMEN (public letter)
651(3)
Convinced that demonstrations in Birmingham are "unwise and untimely...extreme measures," eight clergymen urge an end to those demonstrations.
Martin Luther King Jr., LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL (public letter/essay)
654(14)
The Nobel prize-winning civil rights leader defends civil disobedience and articulates—from his jail cell—the thinking behind civil rights demonstrations.
Christine Woyshner, MOTHERHOOD, ACTIVISM, AND SOCIAL REFORM (essay)
668(6)
"It would be facile, if not paradoxical, to assume that with the women's liberation movement in the 1970's, mothers have become more politically active and outspoken. In fact, a much-more intense period of maternal activism occurred a century ago."
Julie Quiroz-Martinez, IMMIGRANTS HIT THE ROAD FOR CIVIL RIGHTS (report)
674(6)
This report on the work of the Immigrant Workers Freedom ride describes a 2003 bus tour in support of organized labor, reminding us that the legacy of activism familiarized in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath is far from dead.
Douglas Renton, John Melville, and Kim Walesh, THE RISE OF THE NEW CIVIC REVOLUTIONARIES: ANSWERING THE CALL TO STEWARDSHIP IN OUR TIMES (essay)
680(11)
Though activism is often associated with individualistic acts outside the mainstream, this essay suggests that "civic revolutionaries" can—and perhaps should be—nurtured into a collaborative network of people with common goals.
What Is the Scope of Government Regulation I? Legislating Information, Guns, and Tobacco
691(41)
Bill Nelson, THE RIGHT TO PRIVACY (essay)
691(3)
This U.S. senator argues "if the right to privacy means anything, it is the right of the individual to be free from unwarranted governmental intrusion."
John Poindexter, THE NEED FOR INFORMATION AWARENESS (essay)
694(5)
Former director of the Defense Department's Information Awareness Office counters Senator Nelson's arguments against governmental intrusion by suggesting "there are ways in which technology can help preserve rights and protect people's privacy while helping to make us all safer."
Paul Starobin, DAWN OF THE DADDY STATE (essay)
699(5)
Drawing upon Thomas Hobbes' belief that only a strong, authoritarian government can protect people from disorder and dangers, this author suggests that the United States has an obligation to become a "daddy state," protecting the world from those who would undermine civilization.
Ray C. Spencer, CAN WE CURB THE PRIVACY INVADERS? (essay)
704(7)
Rather than suggest that we should or should not allow for gathering of information, this author suggests a series of guidelines for collection of information that can safeguard personal freedoms.
American Library Association, RESOLUTION ON THE USA PATRIOT ACT AND RELATED MEASURES THAT INFRINGE ON THE RIGHTS OF LIBRARY USERS (public resolution)
711(2)
Among the provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act, one of the most controversial has been one that allows government agencies to collect information on books and other materials that individuals have borrowed from libraries. The American Library Association responds.
Robert Goldwin, GUN CONTROL IS CONSTITUTIONAL (essay)
713(3)
"[T]here are strong grounds for arguing that the Second Amendment is no barrier to gun control legislation."
RESPONSES TO ROBERT GOLDWIN (letters to the editor)
716(3)
Oh, yes, there are legal and practical barriers to gun control: Robert Goldwin's readers strike back.
WOMEN AGAINST GUN CONTROL (webpage)
719(1)
WAGC offers ammunition to women who resist gun control.
National Rifle le Association, DON'T EDIT THE BILL OF RIGHTS (advertisement)
720(2)
Here's what the Constitution says about gun control—and what it doesn't say.
Douglas Bettcher and Chitra Subramaniam, THE NECESSITY OF GLOBAL TOBACCO REGULATIONS (essay)
722(2)
These leaders of the World Health Organization's "Tobacco Free Initiative" suggest that regulation is necessary because "tobacco companies have shown themselves to be incapable of self-regulation."
Walter E. Williams, NAZI TACTICS (essay)
724(8)
This consistent advocate of personal choice and responsibility suggests that the war against tobacco amounts to "Nazi-like vilification tactics."
VISUAL CONVERSATIONS 5 THE VARIED FACES OF ACTIVISM
728(1)
Moments of great courage in the face of injustice and superior power have long fueled activist movements, especially when those moments are captured visually. This collection of images shows just how powerful the acts of an individual can be when pictures of that act become part of the public memory.
What Is the Scope of Government Regulation II? Who Is Watching What We Eat?
732(18)
Eric Schlosser, FAST FOOD NATION (essay)
732(4)
The author of the best-selling book that carries the same name as this essay examines the effects of a fast-food culture on not only our physical health, but our mental and spiritual health as well.
Charles Stein, IN SUPERSIZED WORLD, REGULATORY INDIGESTION (essay)
736(2)
"These harmful products didn't drop from the sky. Neither did consumers one day announce, 'Gee, I wish I could have a car that gets lousy mileage or food that makes me grossly fat."
Ninos P Malek, FAST FOOD AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY (essay)
738(3)
"People who are dying because of smoking-related illnesses have nobody to blame but themselves. And it's the same for people who eat poorly. I have never seen Ronald McDonald with an M-16 forcing people to buy Big Macs."
Susan Llewelyn Leach, THOSE EXTRA POUNDS ARE THEY GOVERNMENT'S BUSINESS? (essay)
741(4)
"Having the government in your kitchen wouldn't be the first time private habits have come under outside scrutiny."
Walter E. Williams, WHOSE BUSINESS IS IT? (essay)
745(2)
"There is absolutely no moral case for government's taking another American's earnings, through taxes, to care for me for any reason whatsoever."
James Matorin, OBESITY AWARENESS CAMPAIGN NEEDED, BUT REGULATIONS WON'T CURB FAST-FOOD APPETITE (essay)
747(3)
According to this marketing entrepreneur, there is no place for the "nutritional police" to either regulate the food we eat or to create "a lot of intellectual banter and demands that restaurant menus take on the heft of encyclopedias."
How Does Social Class Affect Crime and Punishment?
750(45)
Ed Mead, REFLECTIONS ON CRIME AND CLASS (essay)
750(4)
While the poor are kept in line by the fear of crime in their neighborhoods, "the rich live in remote gated communities; their banks have armed guards, sophisticated alarms, and are protected by the jurisdiction of the federal courts and investigative techniques of the FBI."
Christian Parenti, CRIME AS SOCIAL CONTROL (essay)
754(8)
This socialist author argues that crime and punishment in this country are not about justice, but about keeping the poor in their place.
Patrick Leahy, CONGRESS SHOULD PASS LEGISLATION TO LOWER FEDERAL CRACK COCAINE SENTENCES (essay)
762(4)
This U.S. senator argues for the reduction of crack cocaine sentences to make them more equitable with penalties for the use of powder cocaine.
Larry D. Thompson, CONGRESS SHOULD NOT LOWER FEDERAL CRACK COCAINE SENTENCES (essay)
766(4)
Countering Senator Leahy's argument, this deputy attorney general insists "lowering crack penalties is inconsistent with a rejuvenated national fight against illegal drug use."
Jeffrey Reiman, from THE RICH GET RICHER AND THE POOR GET PRISON (sociological study)
770(17)
"One of the reasons the offender 'at the end of the road in prison is likely to be a member of the lowest social and economic groups in the country' is that the police officers who guard the access to the road to prison make sure that more poor people make the trip than well-to-do people."
Richard Johnston, THE BATTLE AGAINST WHITE-COLLAR CRIME (essay)
787(13)
This former director of the White Collar Crime Center reports on the often-overlooked social cost of this growing form of crime—crime committed by those with access to wealth and to powerful new technologies.
Part Six Science and Society 795(126)
Introduction
796(4)
Is Our Faith in Science Justified?
800(30)
Jonathan Swift, from GULLIVER's TRAVELS, Book 3, CHAPTER 2 (satire)
800(7)
Shipwrecked in a land where scientists are so obsessed with their theoretical work that they need to be regularly slapped in the head to keep them focused on the real world, Gulliver learns how disconnected scientists can be from day-to-day life.
Dorothy Nelkin, THE SCIENTIFIC MYSTIQUE (essay)
807(14)
This sociologist explores the ways that the aura surrounding scientific discovery "helps to perpetuate the distance between science and the citizen."
Murial Lederman, SCIENCE IS A SOCIAL ENTERPRISE (essay)
821(3)
"Scientists can no longer afford to ignore the fact that science is a social activity, with norms, attitudes, and practices shaped by history, institutions, beliefs, and values."
L.H. Neese, SCIENCE VS. RELIGION: THE CHALLENGE OF INTERPRETATION (essay)
824(6)
Science "succeeds because the intellectual processes that guide those in the pursuit of scientific knowledge yield results which can be confirmed by independent investigators everywhere. In contrast, the various religions do not have their beliefs confirmed by independent investigators."
Is Genetic Engineering a Threat or a Moral Imperative?
830(43)
Kenan Malik, THE MORAL CLONE (essay)
830(4)
"There are no reasons to regard the cloning of human beings as unethical. There is, on the other hand, something deeply immoral about a campaign that seeks to block [it]."
Kenneth R. Weiss, IT CAME FROM THE GENE LAB (report)
834(4)
Is the genetic engineering of animals and plants a boon to medicine and to food producers, or are there serious dangers to meddling with nature?
David B. Sandalow, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND WORLD HUNGER (essay)
838(6)
"In fighting hunger and poverty, modern biotechnology must be part of our arsenal."
Institute of Science in Society, OPEN LETTER FROM WORLD SCIENTISTS TO ALL GOVERNMENTS CONCERNING GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS (public letter)
844(11)
A group of world scientists call for "the immediate suspension of all environmental releases of GM [genetically modified] crops and products."
Richard Manning, SUPER ORGANICS (report)
855(8)
"Forget Frankenfruit—the new-and-improved flavor of gene science is Earth-friendly and all-natural. Welcome to the golden age of smart breeding."
Ron Reagan, ADDRESS TO THE 2004 DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION (speech)
863(3)
Son of one of the most popular Republican presidents of our time, Ron Reagan addresses the opposition party in support of embryonic stem cell research, for "how can we affirm life if we abandon those whose own lives are so desperately at risk?"
Steven Milloy, RON REAGAN WRONG ON STEM CELLS (essay)
866(1)
Written more than a week before Ron Reagan delivered his impassioned plea for supporting embryonic stem cell research, this author's critique of Reagan's message suggests that the address "will be a junk-science fueled spectacle."
NANCY REAGAN AND MICHAEL J. FOX SUPPORT STEM CELL RESEARCH (photograph)
867(2)
The wife of former President Ronald Reagan (who suffered for more than a decade with Alzheimer's disease) and actor Michael J. Fox (who suffers from Parkinson's disease) make an appeal for funding embryonic stem cell research—research that some have suggested might someday cure those disorders. What impact does this visual moment have upon the cause?
Richard M. Doerflinger, DON'T CLONE RON REAGAN'S AGENDA (essay)
869(4)
Ron Reagan's "ignorance poses an obstacle to real advances that are right before our eyes."
At What Price Wilderness?
873(48)
John Muir, SAVE HETCH HETCHY VALLEY! (essay)
873(7)
The legendary founder of the Sierra Club offers a stirring defense of wilderness as an American Eden: "no holier temple has ever been consecrated in the heart of man."
Wallace Stegner, A WILDERNESS LETTER (public letter)
880(6)
"I want to speak for the wilderness idea as something that has helped form our character and that has certainly shaped our history as a people."
William Cronon, THE TROUBLE WITH WILDERNESS (essay)
886(27)
Do the views of Muir and Stegner still hold for the twenty-first century? William Cronon wonders whether "the time has come to rethink wilderness."
Samuel P. Hays, RESPONSE TO WILLIAM CRONON (essay)
913(8)
"Cronon's wilderness is a world of abstract ideas, real enough to those who participate in it, but divorced from the values and ideas inherent in wilderness action."
VISUAL. CONVERSATIONS 6 Picturing the Landscape
918(1)
How are our experiences of the landscape and wildlife influenced by the work of visual artists? This series of images asks you to consider how the eye of the artist re-creates—or distorts—the experience of nature.
CREDITS 921(6)
AUTHOR/TITLE INDEX 927


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