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Convict Criminology,9780534574338
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Convict Criminology

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780534574338

ISBN10:
0534574335
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/19/2002
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 8/19/2002.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

CONVICT CRIMINOLOGY is a collection of chapters written by criminologists, half of whom are ex-convicts. The book includes provocative discussions of rehabilitation, recidivism, drug addiction, life inside different prison systems, transincarceration, discrimination against felons, fathers in prison, and children in adult jails. The book merges autobiographical stories with criminological research to introduce a convict perspective that includes new ideas, vocabulary, and policy recommendations. CONVICT CRIMINOLOGY is a comprehensive text that covers all major topics related to prison life, prisoner reentry to the community, and research on prisons, in an engaging, thought-provoking style.

Table of Contents

Foreword xiv
Todd R. Clear
Preface xvii
John Irwin
Acknowledgments xxiii
Contributors xxiv
Introduction: What is the New School of Convict Criminology? 1(1)
Jeffrey Ian Ross
Stephen C. Richards
Theoretical and Historical Grounding
2(1)
Theoretical Developments in Criminology
2(1)
Victimology and Constitutive Criminology
2(1)
The Failure of Prisons
3(1)
Prisoners' Rights Movement
4(1)
Inside Perspective
4(1)
Centrality of Ethnography
5(1)
Current Initiatives
5(1)
Defining the New School of Convict Criminology
6(1)
Collaborative Nature
7(1)
Inclusion Criteria
7(1)
Who Are the Convict Authors?
7(2)
The Preeminence of John Irwin
9(1)
Criminologists Commit Crime Too
10(1)
Objectives of Convict Criminology
10(1)
Issue-Based Nature of Convict Criminology
10(1)
Questions Asked and Answered by This Book
11(1)
Conclusion: Development and Support of Critical Criminological Perspectives
12(3)
I WHAT'S WRONG WITH CORRECTIONS? 15(62)
The Use of Science to Justify the Imprisonment Binge
17(20)
James Austin
The Role of Science in Advocating Criminal Justice Policy
19(1)
Research-Based ``Think Tanks''
20(1)
Federal Control of Research Dollars
21(1)
Criteria for Assessing Research
22(1)
The Major Studies
23(10)
The Numbers Do Not Add Up
33(1)
Conclusion: Who's Afraid of the Bogeyman?
34(3)
(Mis) Representing Prisons: The Role of Our Cultural Industries
37(22)
Jeffrey Ian Ross
The Importance of Mythmaking about Crime, Criminal Justice, and Corrections
38(4)
Why Are Myths about Corrections Successful?
42(2)
The Contribution of Cultural Industries
44(11)
Conclusion
55(4)
Why I Study Prisons: My Twenty-Year Personal and Professional Odyssey and an Understanding of Southern Prisons
59(18)
Marianne Fisher-Giorlando
Introduction: A White Female Yankee Ph.D. in Prison
59(1)
Early Biographical History
60(1)
College, Graduate School, and Divorce between 40 and 42
60(1)
Teaching in Prison, the End or the Beginning?
61(1)
Prisoners Teach the Teacher
62(1)
A Gift from Prisoners: My Dissertation
63(2)
Research in Prison
65(1)
Women in the Louisiana State Penitentiary: The Road to the Angolite Office
66(1)
Brief History of Southern Prisons
67(2)
Angola and Two Days in the Angolite Office
69(2)
Invitation to Corrections Professionals
71(1)
Opportunities in Prison: Visitation and Support
72(1)
Guest Lecturers
72(1)
Community Service
73(1)
Traditional Prison Volunteer Groups
73(1)
Conclusion: An Invitation
74(3)
II CONVICT EXPERIENCE AND IDENTITY 77(150)
Comments and Reflections on Forty Years in the American Criminal Justice System
81(14)
Edward Tromanhauser
The Criminal Act in Perspective
82(1)
American Criminologists
83(1)
Theories about the Origins or Etiology of Criminal Behavior
83(1)
Why Did I Become a Criminal?
84(1)
Crime and the Law
85(1)
Corrections in America
86(1)
Does Sending More People to Prison Reduce Crime?
87(1)
Criminologists and Public Policy
88(1)
Prison as a Black Box
89(2)
Why Do People Return to Prison?
91(1)
A Typical Parole Story
91(1)
Reentry Problems: Three Basic Needs
92(1)
Conclusion: What I Have Learned
93(2)
From C-Block to Academia: You Can't Get there From Here
95(25)
Charles M. Terry
Prison Social Worlds, Meanings, and Reference Groups
97(1)
My Life before Prison
98(1)
My Early Years in Prison
99(1)
Early Years on Parole
100(1)
Move to Oregon
101(1)
The Oregon State Penitentiary: My Last Prison Sentence
101(1)
Personal Transformation through College Education
102(3)
My Last Parole
105(1)
Narcotics Anonymous
106(1)
Employment? Before School Ordeals
107(1)
Starting Community College
108(1)
A Convict Goes to University
109(1)
Graduate School: ``Making It'' with a Little Help from My Friends
110(1)
Attending Criminology and Criminal Justice Conferences
111(2)
Assistant Professor
113(1)
All in a Day's Work: From the Belly of the Ivory Tower to the Heart of the Inner City
114(1)
Insidious Consequences of the Prison Experience: Cohorts as Evidence
115(2)
Conclusion
117(3)
My Journey Through the Federal Bureau of Prisons
120(30)
Stephen C. Richards
Prison Education
122(1)
University Education
122(1)
Introduction: Journey through the Federal Gulag
123(2)
The Federal War on Drugs
125(1)
Take Down: Catching a Federal Case
125(1)
Conspiracy Convictions
126(1)
Sting Operations
127(1)
Exorbitant Bail Is Used to Force Cooperation
127(1)
Informers
128(1)
Standing Up to Federal Prosecution
129(1)
Doing Federal Jail Time
130(3)
Transport to and within the Federal Gulag
133(2)
Federal Bureau of Prisons
135(1)
Brief Description of Federal Prison Institutions
136(2)
Prisoner Classification and Demographics
138(1)
BOP Central Inmate Monitoring System
139(2)
Federal Prisoner Typology
141(1)
Heroes or Criminals?
142(2)
Doing Time as a Prisoner of the U.S. Government
144(1)
Federal Convict Perspective
145(2)
A Few Stories of Prisoner Resistance
147(1)
Conclusion: Enemies of the State
148(2)
Rehabilitating Criminals: It Ain't that Easy
150(20)
Greg Newbold
``Nothing Works''
152(1)
New Zealand: A Case Study in Liberalism
152(1)
Doing Time at Paremoremo
153(2)
The Modern Correctional System
155(1)
Comparing New Zealand with the United States
156(1)
The Effectiveness of New Zealand's Correctional Measures
157(2)
Why Do Corrections Fail?
159(5)
So Why Have Prison Programs?
164(3)
Example of Humane Treatment
167(1)
Conclusion
168(2)
``Who's Doing the Time Here, Me or My Children?'' Addressing the Issues Implicated by Mounting Numbers of Fathers in Prison
170(21)
Charles S. Lanier
Genesis
172(1)
From Questions to Questionnaires
173(1)
Importance and Scope
174(1)
``What'' Do We Know and ``When'' Did We Know It
175(6)
New Directions, New Inspiration
181(1)
Future Study
182(2)
The Eastern Fathers' Group: Mugged by the System
184(2)
The Easy Part
186(5)
Excon: Managing a Spoiled Identity
191(18)
Richard S. Jones
Exconvict
192(1)
The Making of an Inmate
193(2)
From the Inside Looking Out
195(3)
Problems of Reentry
198(1)
My Experience with Reentry
198(1)
Employment?
199(1)
Graduate School
200(2)
Assistant Professor
202(1)
Associate Professor
203(1)
Convict Criminology Authors in This Volume
203(5)
Conclusion: The Moral of This Story
208(1)
Convict Criminology: The Two-Legged Data Dilemma
209(18)
Alan Mobley
Northeast Ohio Corrections Center, Youngstown, Ohio
210(3)
CCA Therapeutic Community
213(4)
College Educated in Federal Prison
217(1)
Back to CCA Youngstown
218(1)
Criminology and ``The White Man's Burden''
218(1)
The Power to Name
219(1)
Shifting Paradigms: Abstract Empiricism
220(1)
Sound Bite Scholarship and the Court of Public Opinion
220(1)
Doing Something about Crime
221(1)
Privatization and the Paradox of Entrepreneurial Prisons
221(2)
Conclusion
223(4)
III SPECIAL POPULATIONS 227(120)
Understanding Women in Prison
231(16)
Barbara Owen
Feminist Criminology
235(1)
Women and Imprisonment in the 1990s
236(2)
The Context of Women's Lives
238(1)
The Contemporary Women's Prison: Problems and Unmet Needs
239(2)
Studying Women's Prison Culture
241(4)
Conclusion
245(2)
Aspirin Ain't Gonna Help the Kind of Pain I'm in: Health Care in the Federal Bureau of Prisons
247(20)
Daniel S. Murphy
Methodology
248(1)
The Right to Timely and Adequate Medical Care
248(2)
U.S. DOJ Policy Statements: Medical Care in the FBOP
250(1)
Symbolic Medical Care
251(2)
Reality of Medical Care at Federal Medical Centers: Voices from Within
253(1)
Politically Rationed Health Care in the FBOP
254(3)
Guerilla Health Care Techniques: Self-Survival
257(2)
The (Un)Compassionate Release Process
259(1)
Prison Population Explosion: Strains on the FBOP Health Care Delivery System
260(4)
Conclusion and Recommendations
264(3)
Convict Criminology and the Mentally Ill Offender: Prisoners of Confinement
267(20)
Bruce A. Arrigo
Constitutive Criminological Theory: An Overview
269(5)
Three Case Studies on Confinement: An Ethnography
274(6)
Constitutive Theory, the Mentally Ill Offender, and Convict Criminology: An Application
280(4)
Implications, Future Research, and Conclusions
284(3)
Soar Like an Eagle, Dive Like a Loon: Human Diversity and Social Justice in the Native American Prison Experience
287(22)
William G. Archambeault
Human Diversity among America's Indigenous Peoples
289(1)
Ethnic Legal Labels and Their Effects
290(3)
Criminological Research on Native Americans
293(2)
Native American Prison Experiences
295(4)
Native American Prisoner Role Schema
299(4)
Conclusion
303(6)
Twenty Years Teaching College in Prison
309(16)
William S. Tregea
Many Prisoners Are Ready for College
310(2)
Prison College Is a Program That Works
312(1)
A Teacher's Reflections on a Prison Career
313(4)
Adjunct Teaching Conditions in Prison College Programs
317(1)
Winning Battles, but Losing the War: Prison College Undercut by ``Big Politics''
318(1)
Convict Perspectives on Issues in Prison Higher Education
319(1)
Prisoner Graduation Ceremonies Reflect Crises
319(2)
Quality Prison College Includes Mechanisms Proven to Lower Recidivism
321(1)
Toward Funding Quality Prison Postsecondary Programs
321(2)
Conclusion
323(2)
Kids in Jail: ``I Mean You Ain't Really Learning Nothin [Productive]''
325(22)
Preston Elrod
Michael T. Brooks
The Research Methodology
327(1)
The Research Setting
328(1)
An Examination of the Social World of Adolescent Prisoners
329(1)
The Control of Prisoners
330(2)
Chickenshit Rules
332(1)
Prisoner Resistance
333(1)
Inconsistency in Prisoner Management
334(1)
Conflict within the Jail
335(3)
Disoriented and Disconnected
338(3)
Rehabilitation and Debilitation
341(2)
Conclusion
343(4)
CONCLUSION: AN INVITATION TO THE CRIMINOLOGY/CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMUNITY 347(7)
Stephen C. Richards
Jeffrey Ian Ross
Authors in this Book
347(1)
Paying Our Respects to the Convict Authors Still in Prison
348(1)
Reforming Criminology and Criminal Justice
349(1)
An Invitation to Join Us: Changing Corrections
350(4)
References 354(31)
Index 385


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