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Corporate Communication,9780072990546
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Corporate Communication

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780072990546

ISBN10:
0072990546
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/7/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Irwin
List Price: $113.40
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Summary

Argenti's Corporate Communication was the first text to tackle this subject, and now in its Fourth Edition, it remains the most comprehensive book in this field. Corporate Communications describes the changes in the environment for business that have taken place over the last half-century and their implications for corporate communication. While attitudes about business have never been totally positive, they have reached an all-time low in recent yearsmistrust and skepticism of corporate entities is high, as are expectations that companies will "give back" to society through philanthropy, community involvement, or environmental protection activities. By showing readers the importance of creating a coordinated corporate communication system, organizations will benefit with important strategies and tools that few companies in the world are using yet. This new edition shows what companies need to know about advanced communication strategies to stay one step ahead of the competition.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Fourth Edition iv
A Note on the Case Method ix
The Changing Environment for Business
1(22)
Attitudes toward American Business through the Years
1(4)
Hollywood: A Window on Main Street and Wall Street
5(1)
The Global Village
6(2)
How to Compete in a Changing Environment
8(4)
Recognize the Changing Environment
9(1)
Adapt to the Environment without Compromising Principles
10(1)
Don't Assume Problems Will Magically Disappear
11(1)
Keep Corporate Communication Connected to Strategy
12(1)
Conclusion
12(1)
Arthur Andersen
13(10)
Communicating Strategically
23(18)
Communication Theory
23(2)
Developing Corporate Communication Strategies
25(11)
Setting an Effective Organization Strategy
25(4)
Analyzing Constituencies
29(3)
Delivering Messages Appropriately
32(3)
Constituency Responses
35(1)
Conclusion
36(2)
Case: Carson Containers
38(3)
An Overview of the Corporate Communication Function
41(24)
From ``PR'' to ``CorpComm''
41(3)
The First Spin Doctors
42(1)
A New Function Emerges
43(1)
To Centralize or Decentralize CorpComm?
44(2)
Where Should the Function Report?
46(3)
The Functions within the Function
49(8)
Identity, Image, and Reputation
49(2)
Corporate Advertising and Advocacy
51(1)
Media Relations
52(1)
Marketing Communications
53(1)
Internal Communications
54(1)
Investor Relations
54(1)
Corporate Social Responsibility
55(1)
Government Relations
56(1)
Crisis Management
56(1)
Conclusion
57(1)
Dell Computer Corporation
58(7)
Identity, Image, and Reputation
65(22)
What Are Identity, Image, and Reputation?
66(1)
Differentiating Organizations through Identity and Image
67(1)
Shaping Identity
68(4)
A Vision That Inspires
68(1)
Names and Logos
69(2)
Putting It All Together: Consistency Is Key
71(1)
Identity Management in Action
72(5)
Step 1: Conduct an Identity Audit
72(1)
Step 2: Set Identity Objectives
73(1)
Step 3: Develop Designs and Names
74(1)
Step 4: Develop Prototypes
75(1)
Step 5: Launch and Communicate
75(2)
Step 6: Implement the Program
77(1)
Image: In the Eye of the Beholder
77(1)
Building a Solid Reputation
78(5)
Why Reputation Matters
79(1)
Measuring and Managing Reputation
80(2)
Corporate Philanthropy and Social Responsibility
82(1)
Conclusion
83(1)
Muzak
84(3)
Corporate Advertising
87(24)
What Is Corporate Advertising?
87(6)
Advertising to Reinforce Identity or Enhance Image
88(2)
Advertising to Attract Investment
90(2)
Advertising to Influence Opinions
92(1)
The History of Corporate Advertising in America
93(2)
Who Uses Corporate Advertising and Why?
95(5)
Increase Sales
96(2)
Create a Stronger Reputation
98(2)
Recruit and Retain Employees
100(1)
Conclusion
100(2)
Corporate Ad Samples
102(9)
Media Relations
111(26)
The News Media
111(3)
The Growth of Business Coverage in the Media
112(2)
Building Better Relations with the Media
114(8)
Conducting Research for Targeting Media
116(1)
Responding to Media Calls
117(1)
Preparing for Media Interviews
118(1)
Gauging Success
119(2)
Maintaining Ongoing Relationships
121(1)
Building a Successful Media Relations Program
122(2)
Involve Media Relations Personnel in Strategy
122(1)
Develop In-House Capabilities
123(1)
Use Outside Counsel Sparingly
123(1)
Developing an Online Media Strategy
124(2)
Extend Your Media Relations Strategy to the Blogosphere
125(1)
Handle Negative News Effectively
126(1)
Conclusion
126(2)
Adolph Coors Company
128(9)
Internal Communications
137(20)
Internal Communications and the Changing Environment
137(2)
Organizing the Internal Communication Effort
139(3)
Goals for Effective Internal Communications
140(1)
Where Should Internal Communications Report?
140(2)
Implementing an Effective Internal Communications Program
142(10)
Communicate Up and Down
143(1)
Make Time for Face-to-Face Meetings
144(1)
Communicate Online
145(2)
Create Employee-Oriented Publications
147(2)
Communicate Visually
149(1)
Focus on Internal Branding
150(1)
Consider the Company Grapevine
151(1)
Management's Role in Internal Communications
152(1)
Conclusion
153(1)
Westwood Publishing
154(3)
Investor Relations
157(26)
Investor Relations Overview
157(3)
The Evolution of Investor Relations
158(2)
A Framework for Managing Investor Relations
160(9)
The Objectives of Investor Relations
160(1)
Types of Investors
161(2)
Intermediaries
163(6)
Developing an Investor Relations Program
169(4)
How (and Where) Does IR Fit into the Organization?
169(2)
Using IR to Add Value
171(2)
Investor Relations and the Changing Environment
173(2)
Conclusion
175(1)
Steelcase, Inc.
176(7)
Government Relations
183(28)
Government Begins to Manage Business: The Rise of Regulation
184(2)
The Reach of the Regulatory Agencies
185(1)
How Business ``Manages'' Government: The Rise of Government Relations
186(4)
The Government Relations Function Takes Shape
187(3)
The Ways and Means of Managing Washington
190(4)
Coalition Building
190(1)
CEO Involvement in Government Relations
190(1)
Lobbying on an Individual Basis
191(1)
Political Action Committees
192(2)
Conclusion
194(2)
Disney's America Theme Park: The Third Battle of Bull Run
196(15)
Crisis Communication
211(44)
What Is a Crisis?
211(3)
Crisis Characteristics
213(1)
Crises from the Past 25 Years
214(11)
1982: Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol Recall
214(2)
1990: The Perrier Benzene Scare
216(1)
1993: Pepsi-Cola's Syringe Crisis
217(2)
The New Millennium: The Online Face of Crises---Data Theft and Beyond
219(6)
How to Prepare for Crises
225(7)
Assess the Risk for Your Organization
226(2)
Set Communication Objectives for Potential Crises
228(1)
Analyze Channel Choice
228(2)
Assign a Different Team to Each Crisis
230(1)
Plan for Centralization
230(1)
What to Include in a Formal Plan
230(2)
Communicating during the Crisis
232(4)
Step 1: Get Control of the Situation
232(1)
Step 2: Gather as Much Information as Possible
233(1)
Step 3: Set Up a Centralized Crisis Management Center
233(1)
Step 4: Communicate Early and Often
233(1)
Step 5: Understand the Media's Mission in a Crisis
234(1)
Step 6: Communicate Directly with Affected Constituents
234(1)
Step 7: Remember That Business Must Continue
235(1)
Step 8: Make Plans to Avoid Another Crisis Immediately
235(1)
Conclusion
236(1)
Case: Coca-Cola India
237(18)
Bibliography 255(4)
Index 259


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