CART

(0) items

Court Reporter's and CART Services Handbook : A Guide for All Realtime Reporters, Captioners, and Cart Providers,9780130976345
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Court Reporter's and CART Services Handbook : A Guide for All Realtime Reporters, Captioners, and Cart Providers

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130976345

ISBN10:
0130976342
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $106.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $16.63
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • The Complete Court Reporter's Handbook and Guide for Realtime Writers
    The Complete Court Reporter's Handbook and Guide for Realtime Writers




Summary

This practical, real-world guide serves as a complete "how to" reference on the different aspects of court reporting. It uses easy-to-understand language to introduce both the basic and advanced concepts of court reporting across a wide range of court and legal procedures. The book is packed with general forms, sample written knowledge tests, and review questions designed to give learners an excellent source of information concerning how the court reporter functions in the real world, as well as actual issues they face. A five-part organization divides material into sections on General Information; Official Reporting; Freelance; Caption and CART; and Useful Information. Comprehensive coverage includes the various types of reporting assignments, administering oaths, notary public duties, taking and transcribing court cases, and video grand jury work. For court reporters, freelance reporters, closed captioning reporters, and CART providers.

Table of Contents

Section A General Information for Anyone Interested in Court and Realtime Reporting 1(24)
Considering Reporting as a Career
3(8)
So You Want to Be a Reporter
3(1)
Common Characteristics of Highly Effective Reporters
3(2)
Mastering the Skill
5(1)
Court Reporting: Facts and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
6(5)
Facts
6(1)
Frequently Asked Questions
7(4)
A Self-Test to Determine Your Interest in Reporting
11(4)
What Are the Positives and the Negatives?
11(1)
Should You Become a Reporter?
12(2)
Will You Succeed?
14(1)
The Reporting Profession Defined
15(10)
Who Are Court and Realtime Reporters?
15(2)
They Are Diverse
15(1)
They Have a Positive Attitude
15(1)
They Persevere
15(1)
They Maintain Confidentiality
16(1)
They Are Respectful
16(1)
They Know How to Use Tact and Diplomacy
16(1)
They Possess a Sense of Loyalty and Pride
16(1)
They Are Punctual and Efficient
16(1)
They Are Trustworthy
16(1)
They Earn Their Pay
17(1)
What Does a Court and Realtime Reporter Do?
17(1)
Writing: Capturing the Spoken Word
17(1)
Reading: Producing the Transcript
18(1)
When Do Court and Realtime Reporters Do Their Jobs?
18(2)
Whenever an Accurate Record Is Needed
19(1)
Whenever a Quick Transcript Is Needed
19(1)
Whenever a Permanent Record Is Necessary
19(1)
Whenever Lawyers and Judges Want to Save Time and Money
19(1)
Whenever Assistive Reporting Is Needed
19(1)
Where Do Court and Realtime Reporters Report?
20(1)
Legal Reporting
20(1)
Medical Reporting
20(1)
Entertainment Reporting
20(1)
Educational Reporting
20(1)
Business Reporting
21(1)
Why Use Court and Realtime Reporters?
21(4)
Accuracy
21(1)
Reliability
21(1)
Time Efficiency and Cost-Effectiveness
22(1)
Litigation Support
22(1)
The Human Factor
23(2)
Section B Official Court Reporting 25(118)
The Working Environment of the Official Court Reporter
27(11)
Qualifying by Examination
27(1)
Remuneration of an Official Reporter
28(1)
Job Considerations of an Official Reporter
28(1)
Cautions for the Official Reporter
28(1)
Examples of Official Reporting Jobs
29(5)
Pretrial Conference
29(1)
Preliminary Examination
30(1)
Grand Jury Investigation
31(3)
Arraignments and Sentencings
34(1)
Ten Advantages of Official Reporting
34(2)
Ten Disadvantages of Official Reporting
36(2)
Terminology of the Official Court Reporter
38(4)
Parties to an Action
38(1)
Pleadings
38(1)
Jurisdiction
39(1)
The Venue
39(1)
Discovery
40(1)
Court Docket or Calendar
40(1)
Officers of the Court
40(1)
The Jury
40(1)
Judgment
41(1)
The Verdict
41(1)
Court Chambers and Open and Closed Court
41(1)
Ex Parte Hearings and Order to Show Cause
41(1)
A Typical Criminal Jury Trial
42(14)
Beginning of a Criminal Trial
42(4)
Grand Jury Investigation
43(1)
Preliminary Examination
43(1)
Coroner's Inquest
44(1)
The Arraignment and Other Pretrial Matters
45(1)
Selection of the Jury
46(3)
The Trial
49(7)
Opening Statements by Counsel
50(2)
Plaintiff's Case in Chief
52(1)
Defendant's Case in Chief
52(1)
Prosecution Rebuttal and Defense Surrebuttal
53(1)
Testimony by Deposition
53(1)
Bench Conference or Sidebars
53(1)
Jury Visits
53(1)
Closing Arguments
53(1)
The Court's Instruction to the Jury
54(1)
Jury Deliberations and Verdict
54(1)
Directed verdicts and Special Issues
55(1)
Reporting the Verdict
55(1)
A Typical Civil Jury Trial
56(4)
The Pleadings in a Civil Trial
56(1)
Counterclaims and Cross-Claims
56(1)
Pretrial Activities
57(1)
Motions Made before Trial
57(1)
Discovery
57(1)
Pretrial Conferences and Pretrial Orders
57(1)
The Civil Trial
58(1)
Posttrial Activities
59(1)
Things to Consider before a Trial Begins
60(6)
The Court Calendar
60(1)
How to Complete the Worksheet
61(2)
Basic Parts of a Reporter's Worksheet
62(1)
Trial Stipulations
63(3)
Stipulations of Fact
64(1)
Stipulations of Evidence
64(2)
How to Administer the Oath, Examination Identification
66(7)
The Oath
66(1)
How to Administer the Oath of a Witness
66(1)
How to Show the Oath in the Transcript
67(1)
Transcription of Oath and Setup for Witness Called by the People
67(1)
Oath Not Transcribed for Plaintiff as Witness
67(1)
Resumption of Witness after Recess
68(1)
Transcription of Affirmation for Witness Called by Defendant
68(1)
A Final Note Concerning the Setup of Witnesses
68(1)
How to Designate Speakers and Note the Types of Examinations
69(4)
Question and Answer Designations
69(1)
Speaker Identification Symbols for Colloquy
70(1)
Examination Designations
71(2)
How to Report Parentheticals
73(14)
Parenthetical Notations
73(11)
Noting the Presence of the Defendant
73(1)
Voir Dire Parenthetical
74(1)
Invoking the Rule
74(1)
Reading of the Indictment
75(1)
Opening and Closing Statements
75(1)
Bench Conferences or Sidebars
75(1)
Parentheticals Relating to the Jury
76(1)
Polling the Jury
77(1)
Excusing the Jury
78(1)
In Chambers Hearings
78(1)
Identifying Recesses
78(1)
Off the-Record Discussions
79(1)
Parentheticals Relating to Marking and Receiving Exhibits
79(1)
Parentheticals Showing Action
80(1)
Parentheticals Indicating the Use of Videos or Slides
81(1)
Parentheticals in Interpreted Proceedings
81(1)
Depositions Read into the Record
81(1)
Readback Parentheticals
82(1)
Jury Deliberations and Readbacks
83(1)
Question and Answer Parentheticals
84(2)
Descriptive One-Word Parentheticals
84(1)
Phonetic Spellings
84(1)
The Use of (sic]
85(1)
Speaker Identification
85(1)
English Answers in Interpreted Proceedings
85(1)
Answers That Have No Response
86(1)
A Final Word of Caution about Parentheticals
86(1)
How to Report Motions
87(7)
Different Types of Motions
87(7)
Motion in Limine
87(1)
Motion for a Bill of Particulars
87(1)
Motion to Have Claimant Medically Examined
88(1)
Motion for Change of Venue
88(1)
Motion to Disqualify a Judge
88(1)
Motion for Continuance of Case
88(1)
Motion for Amendment of the Pleadings
88(1)
Motion for Summary Judgment
88(1)
Motion to Dismiss for Want of Jurisdiction
88(1)
Motion to Dismiss for Lack of Prosecution
88(1)
Motion for Nonsuit
89(1)
Motion for Protective Order
89(1)
Motion to Compel
89(1)
Motion for Writ of Habeas Corpus
89(1)
Motion to Dismiss Complaint
89(1)
Motion for Mistrial
90(1)
Motion to View Premises
90(1)
Motion for a New Trial
91(1)
Motion to Strike
91(3)
How to Report Objections
94(13)
Anticipating and Marking Objections
94(1)
How to Handle Objections
95(1)
Grounds for Objections
95(12)
Incompetent, Irrelevant, and Immaterial
95(1)
Leading and Suggestive Questions
96(1)
Nonresponsive Answers
97(1)
Lack of Proper Foundation
97(1)
Facts Not in Evidence
97(1)
Repetitious Questioning (Asked and Answered)
98(1)
Hearsay Evidence
98(1)
Self-Serving Answers
99(1)
Compound and Complex Questions
99(1)
Ambiguous Questions
100(1)
Other Than the Best Evidence
100(1)
Call for Conclusions or Opinions
100(1)
Illegally Obtained Evidence
101(1)
Self-Incriminating Testimony
101(1)
Cross-Examination beyond the Scope of Direct Examination
102(1)
The Question Calls for Expert Testimony
102(1)
Counsel Is Taking Witness on a Fishing Expedition
102(1)
Badgering the Witness
102(1)
Evidence Speaks for Itself
103(1)
Privileged Information
103(1)
Narrative Form of Testimony
103(1)
Objections to Expert Witness
104(1)
Mention of Insurance
104(1)
Objections as a Result of Surprise
105(1)
Attempt to Impeach One's Own Witness
105(1)
Objections to Exhibits
105(2)
How to Mark Exhibits
107(7)
What Constitutes an Exhibit
107(1)
Marking Exhibits
107(1)
Exhibit Stamp
108(1)
A Well-Inked Stamp Pad
108(1)
Miscellaneous Marking Materials
108(1)
Where to Mark Exhibits
108(1)
What to Mark on the Exhibit
109(1)
Procedures for Marking Exhibits
109(1)
Marking Different Objects
109(2)
Marking Papers That Are Clipped Together
110(1)
Marking Envelopes or Bags Containing various Items of Evidence
110(1)
Marking Substitutes for Original Exhibits
110(1)
Marking Dry Erase Board or Blackboard Drawings as Exhibits
110(1)
Marking Bulky Items as Exhibits
110(1)
Exhibit Parentheticals
111(1)
Who Marks Exhibits and What Happens to Them?
111(1)
A Final Note about Exhibits
112(2)
How to Read Back and Testify
114(6)
Reading Back
114(1)
Practice Reading Back
114(1)
Develop a Readback Voice
114(1)
Take Time to Read
115(1)
Why Readback Situations Occur
115(1)
How to Read Back
115(1)
Finding and Marking Readback Spots
116(1)
Reading Back to the Jury
116(1)
Testifying in Open Court
117(2)
What to Do When Testifying
117(1)
Types of Questions to Expect
118(1)
Reporting and Testifying
119(1)
General Guidelines
119(1)
How to Produce the Transcript
120(9)
Preliminaries
120(1)
Title Page
121(1)
Appearance Page
122(1)
Index Page
123(1)
Stipulations Page
124(1)
Body of the Transcript
124(1)
Reporter's Certificate
124(2)
A Final Word about Transcripts
126(3)
How to Invoice and Deliver the Transcript
129(3)
Assembling the Transcript
129(1)
Court Transcripts
130(1)
Estimating the Cost of a Transcript
131(1)
A Final Word about Transcripts
131(1)
How a Trial Transcript Looks
132(11)
Section C Freelance Reporting 143(50)
The Working Environment of the Freelance Reporter
145(6)
Freelance Agencies
145(2)
Employee Status
145(1)
Employee Benefits
146(1)
Reporter-Agency Fee Split
146(1)
Place of Work
146(1)
Equipment and Supplies
147(1)
Examples of Freelance Agencies
147(1)
Agency A
147(1)
Agency B
147(1)
Agency C
148(1)
Choosing the Best Agency
148(1)
Ten Advantages of Freelance Reporting
148(1)
Ten Disadvantages of Freelance Reporting
149(1)
Reporting as a Self Employed Freelancer
149(1)
Ten Advantages of Independent Freelance Reporting
149(1)
Ten Disadvantages of Independent Freelance Reporting
150(1)
Working for an Agency or Working on Your Own
150(1)
Terminology of the Freelance Reporter
151(8)
Deposition Reporting
151(3)
De Bene Esse Deposition
151(1)
Discovery Deposition
152(1)
In Aid of Execution Deposition
152(1)
Deposition on Written Questions
152(1)
Calling of the Deposition
152(2)
Interrogatories
154(2)
Statement Reporting
156(3)
Reporting a Typical Deposition: General Information
159(5)
Before the Deposition
159(1)
Obtain Directions
159(1)
Be Prepared
160(1)
Pertinent Information
160(1)
At the Deposition
160(2)
Get a Copy of the Pleadings
161(1)
Set Up Equipment and Await the Arrival of Attorneys
161(1)
Stipulations and Oath
161(1)
Examination and Exhibits
161(1)
Question Certification
161(1)
Stopping Witnesses and Attorneys
161(1)
Off the-Record Discussions
162(1)
Parentheticals
162(1)
Correct Spellings
162(1)
At the End of the Deposition
162(1)
Deposition Exhibits
162(1)
Retroactive Oath
162(1)
Delivery Time
163(1)
Special Requests
163(1)
Signing of the Deposition and Filing of the Original
163(1)
Charges and Invoicing
163(1)
Proofreading the Final Copy
163(1)
Things to Consider When Deposition Reporting
163(1)
Deposition Reporting: Things to Consider
164(10)
Freelance Office Appointment Book
164(1)
Preparation for Reporting Assignments
164(1)
The Deposition Worksheet
165(1)
How to Report Deposition Stipulations
165(2)
Usual Stipulations
166(1)
Dictated Stipulations
167(1)
Where Stipulations Are Placed in the Transcript
167(1)
How to Administer Oath and Prepare Witness Setup
168(1)
The Notary Public
168(1)
Reporter's Oath Used at a Deposition or Statement
169(1)
How to Designate Speakers and Types of Examinations
169(1)
How to Report Deposition Parentheticals
169(1)
How to Report Objections
170(1)
How to Certify a Question
170(3)
Immediate Certification
170(1)
Certification after the Fact
171(2)
How to Mark and Handle Deposition Exhibits
173(1)
How to Read Back at a Deposition
173(1)
The Deposition Transcript: Transcribing, Invoicing, and Delivery
174(7)
Deposition Transcripts
174(7)
Reading and Signing the Transcript
174(4)
Invoicing and Delivery of Deposition Transcripts
178(2)
Delivering the Copies and Filing the Original Deposition
180(1)
How the Deposition Transcript Looks
181(12)
Section D Captioning Reporting and CART 193(36)
The Working Environment of the Captioner
195(10)
Different Captioning Jobs
195(2)
Broadcast Captioners
195(1)
Steno Interpreters or Stenocaptioners
196(1)
CART Providers
197(1)
The Cart Provider's Manual
197(8)
Terminology and Legislation
205(8)
Some Basic Terms
205(1)
Legislation Pertaining to Captioning
206(7)
The Telecommunications Act of 1996
206(7)
A Day in the Life of a Captioning Reporter
213(5)
The Captioning Industry
213(1)
Equipment and Office
213(1)
Captioning: Four Different Perspectives
214(4)
How the Captioned Job Looks
218(11)
Section E Helpful Information for the Reporting Profession 229(36)
Ethics of the Reporting Profession
231(7)
Preamble
231(1)
Code of Professional Ethics
232(1)
Guidelines for Professional Practice
233(5)
Professionalism, Associations, Testing, and Continuing Education
238(4)
Professionalism
238(1)
Court Reporting Associations
239(1)
Testing and Continuing Education
239(2)
Individual Agency Tests
239(1)
Individual State Tests
240(1)
National Examinations
240(1)
A Final Word about Testing
241(1)
Continuing Education
241(1)
Research for the Record, Internet Research, Citations of Authority
242(10)
A Court Reporter's Reference Library
242(4)
Unabridged Dictionaries
242(1)
Desk Dictionaries
243(1)
Topical Dictionaries
243(1)
Legal References
243(1)
Medical References
243(1)
Encyclopedias
244(1)
Grammar and Punctuation
244(1)
Other Useful References
244(1)
Miscellaneous
244(1)
The Internet
245(1)
Reporting Legal Citations
246(6)
Federal Codes
246(1)
State Codes
246(2)
Appellate Decisions
248(3)
Indexes
251(1)
Finding Employment
252(5)
The Job Search
252(1)
The Resume
253(1)
The Letter of Application
254(1)
The Job Interview
255(2)
The Office Environment
257(4)
The Office
257(1)
Office Furniture and Space
257(1)
Office Color, Light, and Temperature
258(1)
Health Issues for Court Reporters
258(3)
Repetitive Strain Injuries
258(1)
Back-Related Problems
259(1)
Vision Strain
259(1)
Stress-Related Problems
259(1)
Always Consult a Professional
260(1)
The Court System in America
261(4)
Federal Court Structure
261(1)
United States Supreme Court
261(1)
United States Courts of Appeals
262(1)
United States District Courts
262(1)
Special Federal Courts
262(1)
Individual State Courts
262(3)
State Trial Courts
263(1)
State Lower Courts
263(1)
Justice of the Peace Courts
264(1)
Section F The Technology of the Reporter 265(22)
Hardware and Software Considerations, CAT and Litigation Support
267(6)
Hardware and Software
267(1)
Computer Basics
268(1)
Computer-Aided Transcription
269(2)
The Cat Cycle
270(1)
The Cat Dictionary
271(1)
Other Cat Features
271(1)
Litigation Support
271(2)
Condensed Transcript
272(1)
Keyword Indexing
272(1)
Instant Viewing and Marking Capabilities
272(1)
Different Print Options
272(1)
Other Litigation Support Services
272(1)
The Technology of Transcript Production
273(11)
Realtime Writing and Translation
273(1)
Closed Captioning
274(1)
CART
275(1)
Videography
275(2)
Advantages of Videotaping
276(1)
Disadvantages of Videotaping
276(1)
Applications of Videotaping
276(1)
Forms Used by Videotape Technicians
277(1)
A Final Note about Videotaping
277(1)
Electronic Tape Recording
277(4)
A Place for Tape Recorders
278(2)
Advantages of Using Tape Recorders
280(1)
Disadvantages of Using Tape Recorders
280(1)
A Final Note about Electronic Tape Recording
281(1)
Voice-to-Print or Speech-to-Text
281(1)
Problems Encountered with Voice-to-Print
281(1)
Voice-Recognition Technology and voice-Activated Systems
282(1)
A Final Word about Voice-to-Print Technology
282(1)
Voice Writing
282(2)
Tomorrow's Technology: Computer Integrated Courtrooms and Beyond
284(3)
Computer-Integrated Courtrooms
284(1)
Courtroom 21
284(1)
Advantages of CIC
285(1)
Courtroom 2000
285(1)
Tomorrow's Technology
285(1)
A Final Word about Court and Realtime Reporting, Captioning, and CART
286(1)
Index 287


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...