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The Craft and Art of Clay

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131844261

ISBN10:
0131844261
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/8/2003
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $146.80

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Summary

The Craft and Art of Clay is the most comprehensive introduction to ceramics available. The book contains numerous step-by-step illustrations of all ceramic techniques to guide the beginner, as well as an inspirational portfolio of ceramic pieces from contemporary international potters. For the more experienced ceramist, there is a wealth of invaluable information on glaze formulas and other technical details, including temperature conversions, which make the book ideal as a reference. NEW FEATURES OF THE FOURTH EDITION INCLUDE: bull; bull;Trailblazers-special profiles of key ceramists who have made significant contributions around the world. The seven artists featured are: Juan Quezada, Peter Voulkos, Luo Xiao-Ping, Toshiko Takaezu, Huey Beckham, Otto Heino, and Janet Mansfield. bull;A new chapter on Marketing and Computers. The material on marketing in the last edition is expanded to provide more detail on how to sell your work successfully, including preparing it for display, approaching galleries, and finding venues for showing your pieces. New computer material includes technical aspects, from using computers to calculate glaze formulas and computerized firing, to useful programs and websites, and the creation of "virtual ceramics." bull;New material on using gold, alternative glazes, and paperclays. bull;150 new color illustrations. bull;A revised and clarified Compendium of technical information. Invaluable features, such as safety icons to warn beginners of potential hazards, a concise history of ceramics and its traditions from prehistory to the present day, and an updated bibliography, glossary, list of museum collections, residencies and magazines, are retained in this new edition. Susan Peterson's engaging writing style, deep knowledge, and boundless enthusiasm encourage creativity and engender an appreciation of the oldest of arts.

Author Biography

Susan Peterson is Professor Emerita of Ceramics at Hunter College at the City University of New York, and is a practicing ceramist whose work has been exhibited throughout the world

Table of Contents

PREFACE 9(1)
1 THE CRAFT AND ART OF CLAY 10(12)
SAFETY ISSUES
20(2)
2 FABRICATION METHODS 22(80)
INTRODUCTION
23(3)
HANDBUILDING
26(24)
Clayworking tools
30(1)
Spiral wedging
31(1)
Pinching a vessel
32(1)
Coil building
33(1)
Coil and pinch sculpture
34(1)
Handbuilding with porcelain
35(1)
Slab building
36(1)
TRAILBLAZER: Juan Quezada
37(1)
Large slab constructions
38(2)
Handbuilding in or over forms
40(1)
Figures
41(3)
Mechanical methods of forming
44(1)
Making walls
45(2)
Walls
47(1)
John Mason's handbuilt sculpture
48(2)
WHEEL-THROWING
50(41)
Throwing on the wheel
53(1)
Throwing faults and remedies
54(1)
Centering
55(1)
Opening the ball
56(1)
Pulling up
57(1)
Throwing a bowl
58(1)
Shinsaku Hamada's large bowl
59(1)
Toshiko Takaezu's balloon-form
60(1)
Throwing a pitcher
61(1)
Bowl forms
62(1)
Pitcher and bottle forms
63(1)
Throwing a bottle
64(1)
Methods of footing pots
65(1)
Pulling and attaching handles
66(1)
Thrown and cut handles
67(1)
Flat lids for flanged pots
68(1)
Dome lids for flanged pots
69(1)
Flanged lids: domed and flat
70(1)
Lidded pot forms
71(1)
Casserole dish with inside flange
72(1)
Casserole trimming and lid making
73(1)
Thrown casserole knob
74(1)
Platter throwing
75(1)
Platter and plate trimming
76(1)
Platter forms
77(1)
Teapot forms
78(1)
Teapot throwing, lid and spout
79(2)
Susan Peterson's wheel-thrown forms
81(1)
Donut throwing and trimming
82(1)
Off-the-hump throwing
83(1)
Pedestal vessels
84(1)
Large constructions
85(3)
TRAILBLAZER: Peter Voulkos
88(2)
Thrown and hand construction
90(1)
PLASTERWORK
91(11)
Preparing plaster
93(1)
Making a one-piece mold
94(1)
Making a two-piece mold
95(1)
Two-piece mold with handle
96(1)
Slip casting and press molding
97(1)
Multipiece molds
98(1)
Wheelheads and complicated molds
99(1)
Inventing with molds
100(1)
A ceramic installation
101(1)
3 DESIGN, DECORATION, AND GLAZING 102(26)
DESIGN: FROM IDEA TO ART
103(7)
An exercise in how to see
106(1)
Experimenting with design
107(1)
Design ideas from nature
108(2)
DECORATION
110(6)
Decorating with clay
111(1)
Pre-patterned decoration
112(1)
Creating line in three dimensions
113(1)
Texturing clay
114(1)
Prints from clay
115(1)
GLAZING
116(12)
Weighing and mixing a glaze
118(1)
How to glaze
119(1)
Decorating over and under glaze
120(1)
Decorating with glaze
121(1)
Glaze application
122(2)
Decorative techniques with glazes
124(1)
Surface details
125(1)
The Japanese way
126(1)
Photo-emulsion and decals
127(1)
4 CLAYS 128(30)
Science and ceramic art
129(2)
Geological types of natural clays
131(3)
Commercial clays after firing
134(1)
Test results of commercial clays
135(1)
Classifying fired clay wares
136(3)
What is a clay body?
139(1)
Testing materials
140(2)
Composing a good clay body
142(2)
Talc body
144(2)
Paperclay
146(1)
TRAILBLAZER: Luo Xiao-Ping
147(1)
Additions to the clay-body batch
148(2)
Preparing the clay for work
150(1)
Making casting slip
151(1)
Historical clay bodies
152(4)
Unusual clay bodies
156(2)
5 GLAZES 158(54)
Origins of glazes
158(2)
Feldspars: clay and glaze fluxes
160(1)
Developing glazes
161(1)
Fine examples of glazes
162(2)
Visual samples: 34 glaze materials, alone and in 50/50 blends
164(4)
Reading the test photographs
168(2)
50/50 blends of 34 glaze materials, cone 5 oxidation
170(2)
50/50 blends of 34 glaze materials, cone 10 reduction
172(2)
Compounding a complete glaze
174(1)
Composite glaze fluxes
174(2)
Organic materials for glazes
176(1)
Fusion buttons of frits
177(2)
Garbage glazes
179(1)
Colors
180(4)
Ceramic coloring implements
184(1)
Stains for coloring implements
185(1)
Ways of blending colors
186(6)
Ferro frits-plus-stains - low-fire
192(2)
Frits-plus-stains - high-fire
194(2)
Simple ways of changing glazes
196(2)
Low-fire treatments
198(2)
MayCo "one-strokes" (stains)
200(1)
MayCo "underglazes" (engobes)
201(1)
MayCo "art glazes"
202(1)
MayCo "special glazes"
203(1)
TRAILBLAZER: Toshiko Takaezu
204(1)
Lusters for reduction firing
205(1)
China paint process
205(1)
Making your own lusters for oxidation firing
206(2)
Working with gold
208(2)
Drawing a grid pattern
210(1)
Glaze faults
211(1)
6 FIRING THE WARE 212(36)
MARKETING AND COMPUTERS
248
TEMPERATURE
214(4)
ATMOSPHERE
218(1)
KILNS
219(8)
Placing kilns
223(1)
Kiln materials
223(2)
Stacking kilns
225(2)
FIRING
227(21)
Principles of kiln firing
228(2)
"Rebirth through clay"
230(1)
Special firing techniques
231(2)
Firing faults
233(10)
Fired in place sculpture
243(1)
Patinas developed in firing
244(1)
TRAILBLAZER: Huey Beckham
245(1)
Potters who also work in glass
246(2)
7 MARKETING AND COMPUTERS 248(14)
Marketing
249(4)
TAILBLAZER: Otto Heino
253(1)
Computer programs
254(2)
Virtual ceramics
256(3)
Tableware
259(3)
8 HIGHPOINTS IN CERAMIC HISTORY 262(44)
HISTORICAL OVERVIEW
265(33)
Influences in our time
279(5)
Site-specific installations
284(5)
Tile
289(1)
Narrative
290(5)
Mixed media
295(2)
Kaneko's Fremont project
297(1)
ANCIENT TRADITIONS
298(54)
Bridging two worlds
303(1)
Golden Bridge Pottery
304(1)
TRAILBLAZER: Janet Mansfield
305(1)
9 PORTFOLIO 306(46)
10 COMPENDIUM
GLAZE OXIDES
352(5)
CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS
357(9)
Calculating glaze, batch to formula and formula to batch
359(5)
More charts for use in glaze calculations
364(2)
DATA AND CONVERSIONS
366(52)
Feldspars, frits, and clays
366(1)
Frits
366(1)
Ferro lead-bearing frits
367(1)
Ferro leadless frits
368(1)
Pemco lead-bearing frits
369(1)
Pemco leadless frits
369(5)
Temperatures and cones
374(5)
Conversion charts
379(1)
ARTISTS' TECHNIQUES 380(11)
LIST OF ARTISTS 391(5)
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS 396(16)
GLOSSARY 412(6)
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 418(6)
General books on ceramics
418(2)
Ceramic history
420(3)
Technical books
423(1)
CERAMICS MAGAZINES 424(1)
RESIDENCIES 425(1)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 426(1)
INDEX 427

Excerpts

I graduated from Alfred, New York State College of Ceramics, in the first Master of Fine Arts class after World War II, following an undergraduate degree in Painting (with Ceramics from F Canton Ball) at Mills College in California.At mid-century we were heavily into pots and visions of design for industry that would bring "the greatest good to the greatest number." Functional and decorative pots were our business, although in the early 1900s artists such as George Ohr, Susie Singer, Adelaide Robineau, Wilhelm Koge of Gustavsberg, and George Tinworth of Royal Doulton were among the first purveyors of Funk. Also early in the 20th century some famous painters such as Matisse, Gauguin, Renoir, Chagall, Leger, Miro, Picasso, Braque, Rouault and others were delving into clay, without making much of a dent in the potter's world. Years later we pay homage to their work.The 1950s brought to the fore the Hamada/Leach/Cardew angle of vision, whose legacy it would take us to the 1970s to truly understand. Shoji Hamada (d.1978) and Bernard Leach (d. 1979), two of the most renowned potters who ever lived, founded the concept of studio pottery--Hamada in Japan, Leach and his follower Michael Cardew in England. Many of us were also drawn to the robust Rosanjin or the vibrant Kanjiro Kawai, Japanese masters who also encroached on our Western senses.The Voulkos phenomenon, and the hundreds of international potmakers-turned-sculptors, followed from the 1960s on, Peter Voulkos, the central figure in a group of experimental artists, was responsible for a new vocabulary of clay that spread from the USA abroad. A few schools teaching ceramics in all parts of the world mushroomed into many schools in every corner of our planet.Today workshops, community programs, alternative spaces, exhibitions, fairs, and the like, have caused an explosion in clayworking that seems to encompass the earth. Clay is everywhere and so are the artists. We are even beginning to care about the past millennia of ceramic art history, and we research to increase our knowledge. We have grown up and we are still growing.And so this fourth edition ofThe Craft and Art of Clayhas been revised and expanded again. Each time I think there cannot be more to say or more tests to run, but each edition is changed a lot and added to, with more photographs, more text, so I always find ways to expand. This edition has 22 Ferro Frits pictured and described, because Ferro is about the only frit manufacturer left in the world. The Pemco Frit photos are still here because many of us still have supplies.The fusion button photographs of 34 basic ceramic materials fired at three temperatures, the glaze application 50!50 line blend tests of those 34 materials at cone 5 and 10, the feldspar photographs of bar tests at cone 5 and 10, the six pages of color tests of commercial glazes, the new line blend tests of glazes on iron-red and white clays at three temperatures and two atmospheres, and the many other visual tests of materials, are unprecedented visual aids that appear in no other ceramic book, Who but I would undertake all these tests! This pictorial information is invaluable for clay and glaze work.The huge clay bar test of china clays, ball clays, stoneware clays, fire clays, and common surface clays at three temperatures in two atmospheres was made for the first edition of this book. While clays are generic and similar in their geological classification all over the world, the brand names change, the mines change. The next edition will include this test done anew with currently available mined materials.The next edition will also need more new photographs in the Portfolio, and I need your help with that. Those of you in the book now should send new work, and help me find artists who are not in my file of 1,500 or more international clayworkers.This book contains hundreds of photographs of work from artists arou


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