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Creating Meaning Through Literature and the Arts : An Integration Resource for Classroom Teachers,9780130977779
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Creating Meaning Through Literature and the Arts : An Integration Resource for Classroom Teachers

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780130977779

ISBN10:
0130977772
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $88.40
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Summary

Drama, dance, music, art, literature--all exciting tools for the K-6 classroom. But how do you make the most of them? By using the numerous hands-on activities and ideas in this popular, practical book. Here are dozens of daily routine ideas, integrated unit ideas, and adaptable classroom structures that set forth solid, dependable "how to's" for using the arts throughout the curriculum--in social studies and science, in reading and language arts, even in math. Only in this book will you find such a clear, straightforward summary of these five art forms. And only in this book will you find a clearly presented argument for integratingat least one art form intoevery lesson in every area--every day. Targeted topics include assessment, classroom management/discipline and intervention/adaptation for special needs.

Table of Contents

An Introduction to Teaching With, About, In, and Through The Arts
1(36)
Introduction
4(3)
The Sense and Soul of the Curriculum
4(1)
The Arts: Remarkable Meaning Makers
5(2)
Teaching With, About, In, and Through the Arts
7(1)
Why Integrate the Arts?
7(7)
Reasons to Integrate the Arts
7(7)
What Do Teachers Need to Know and Do to Teach, With, About, In, and Through the Arts?
14(15)
Brain Research: Changing Views of Development
14(2)
Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory
16(4)
Erikson's Stage Theory
20(1)
Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development
21(2)
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
23(1)
Vygotsky's Social Development
24(1)
Creativity and Creative Problem Solving
24(5)
How Can a Teacher Coordinate Research and Theory for Arts Integration?
29(8)
Conditions for Learning: Basic Beliefs
32(5)
Integrating the Arts Thoughout the Curriculum
37(39)
Introduction
40(1)
Why Integrate the Arts Throughout the School Day?
40(2)
Five Minutes a Day?
41(1)
An Arts Integration Army?
42(1)
What Should Teachers Know About Integration?
42(1)
How Can Teachers Meaningfully Integrate the Arts?
43(24)
Teaching With, About, In, and Through the Arts
43(2)
More Than Enterainment
45(1)
Integration Principles and Strategies
45(22)
Special Needs Students: Ten Ways to Adapt
67(9)
Interventions for Diverse Populations
71(5)
Integrating Literature Throughout the Curriculum
76(52)
Introduction
79(1)
Why Should Teachers Integrate Literature?
79(6)
Reasons to Integrate Literature Throughout the Curriculum
79(6)
What Should Teachers Know and Teach about Literature to Integrate It Throughout the Curriculum?
85(22)
Definitions: Children's Literature---A Hopeful Idea?
86(1)
Goals for Literature Integration
86(1)
National Standards Related to Literature
87(1)
Literary Elements
87(6)
Genre: A Category of Literature with Similar Traits
93(14)
How Can Teachers Integrate Literature Throughout the Curriculum?
107(21)
Guidelines and Principles for Integrating Literature
107(21)
Literature Seed Strategies
128(24)
Introduction
129(1)
Energizers and Warm-Ups
129(2)
Teaching about Literature: Elements and Genre Characteristics
131(2)
Connecting Literature to Other Curricular Areas
133(14)
Science Focus
133(5)
Social Studies Focus
138(1)
Informational Books for Social Studies
138(3)
Reading and Language Arts Focus
141(2)
Math Focus
143(4)
Special Focus: Poetry Sharing and Writing
147(5)
General Principles for Poetry Integration
148(1)
Set Up Ongoing Poetry Routines
148(1)
Pointers for Poetry Sharing
148(1)
Pointers for Memorizing Poetry
148(1)
Composing Poetry: Written and Oral
149(3)
Integrating Visual Art Throughout the Curriculum
152(47)
Introduction
155(1)
Stop to See Details
155(1)
Visual Art Literacy
155(1)
Why Should Teachers Integrate Art?
156(6)
Visual Art: Effects on Learning and Motivation
156(5)
National Standards for Art and Other Curriculum Frameworks
161(1)
What Do Teachers Need to Know and Teach to Integrate Art?
162(11)
Art and Child Development: Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor
162(2)
Teaching Students to Do and View Art
164(2)
Art Materials and Techniques
166(1)
Subject Matter: What Art Is About
166(4)
The People of Art: Artists and Their Styles
170(2)
Special Arts Integration Projects
172(1)
National Standards for Art
173(1)
How Can Classroom Teachers Use Art to Enhance Curricular Areas?
173(17)
General Integration Principles
173(17)
Art Connections to Math, Science, Social Studies, and Language Arts
190(9)
Art Seed Strategies
199(26)
Introduction
200(1)
Energizers and Warm-Ups
200(2)
Teaching Art Concepts and Elements
202(4)
Using Different Media
206(10)
Cleanup and Organization Tips
206(1)
Mixing Colors: Color Triangles
206(1)
Drawing and Rubbing
207(1)
Painting and Painting Tools
208(1)
Printmaking
209(1)
Collage
209(1)
Techniques: Enlarge, Simplify, Crop
210(1)
Displays and Bulletin Boards
210(1)
Murals
210(1)
Mixed Media
210(1)
Photography
211(1)
Three-Dimensional Art
211(1)
Bookmaking
212(4)
Connecting Art to Other Curricular Areas
216(9)
Science Focus
216(2)
Social Studies Focus
218(1)
Reading and Language Arts Focus
219(3)
Math Focus
222(3)
Integrating Drama Throughout the Curriculum
225(33)
Introduction
228(1)
Why Should Teachers Integrate Drama?
229(4)
What Do Teachers Need to Know to Use Drama as a Teaching Tool?
233(5)
Creative Drama Defined
234(1)
Drama Components
234(2)
The National Standards for Theater: American Goals
236(2)
How Can Teachers Use Drama as a Teaching Tool?
238(20)
General Integration Principles
238(1)
Teacher Characteristics
239(2)
Planning for Discipline and Management
241(17)
Drama Seed Strategies
258(28)
Introduction
259(1)
Energizers and Warm-Ups
259(2)
Pantomime Strategies
261(5)
Verbal Strategies
266(6)
Connecting Drama to Other Curricular Areas
272(5)
Science Focus
272(1)
Social Studies Focus
273(1)
Reading and Language Arts Focus
274(3)
Math Focus
277(1)
Storytelling's Special Relationship with Drama
277(9)
Why Storytelling?
278(6)
Storytelling Sources and Resources
284(2)
Integrating Dance and Movement Throughout the Curriculum
286(32)
Introduction
289(1)
Relax! You Need Not Be a Dancer Yourself
289(1)
Why Should Teachers Integrate Movement and Dance?
290(4)
Eleven Reasons to Integrate Dance
290(4)
What Do Teachers Need to Know to Use Dance as a Teaching Tool?
294(6)
What's Included in the Study of Dance?
294(1)
Definitions: Creative Dance Versus Movement
295(1)
Creative Movement and Dance
296(1)
Pantomime versus Creative Dance
296(1)
Imagery and Dance
296(1)
Teachers Need Words: Dance Elements Vocabulary
297(1)
Seven National Standards for Dance
298(2)
How Can Teachers Use Dance and Movement as Teaching Tools?
300(18)
General Intergration Principles
300(16)
Reassurance for Classroom Teachers: Common Problems
316(2)
Dance Seed Strategies
318(14)
Introduction
319(1)
Energizers and Warm-Ups
319(3)
Dance Concepts and BEST Elements
322(3)
Connecting Dance to Other Curricular Areas
325(7)
Science Focus
325(1)
Social Studies Focus
326(3)
Reading and Language Arts Focus
329(1)
Math Focus
330(2)
Integrating Music Throughout the Curriculum
332(42)
Introduction
334(1)
Musical Development: Preferences and Tastes
334(1)
Music Is Not My Job?
335(1)
Why Should Teachers Integrate Music?
335(11)
Reasons to Integrate Music
337(9)
What Do Teachers Need to Know to Use Music as a Teaching Tool?
346(6)
Defining Music: When Does Sound Become Music?
346(1)
Music Elements That Help Define Music
346(1)
Musical Instruments
347(1)
Composers, Genre, and Styles of Music for Classroom Use
348(2)
American Culture: Songs to Know
350(2)
The Nine National Standards for Music K-8
352(1)
How Can Teachers Use Music as a Teaching Tool?
352(22)
Music Integration Checklist
352(3)
Music Approaches That Influence Integration
355(1)
Ten Principles for Integration
356(18)
Music Seed Strategies
374(15)
Introduction
375(1)
Energizers and Warm-Ups
375(1)
Basic Muscial Concepts and Elements
376(5)
Connecting Music to Curricular Areas
381(8)
Webbing
381(1)
Science Focus
381(1)
Social Studies Focus
382(2)
Reading and Language Arts Focus
384(3)
Math Focus
387(2)
Integrating the Arts with the Arts: Strategy Seed Ideas
389(15)
Introduction
391(1)
Overall Focus of the Arts
391(1)
Literature and Art (LA)
391(3)
Art and Drama (ADr)
394(1)
Drama and Dance (DrD)
395(1)
Dance and Music (DM)
395(1)
Music and Literature (ML)
396(1)
Literature and Drama (LDr)
397(2)
Drama and Music (DrM)
399(1)
Music and Art (MA)
400(1)
Art and Dance (AD)
401(1)
Dance and Literature (DL)
402(2)
Assessment and Other Frequently Asked Questions
404(10)
Introduction
405(1)
FAQs and Assessment
405(9)
Appendix A Arts-Based Children's Literature 414(17)
Appendix B Award-Winning Children's Literature 431(7)
Appendix C Arts Organizations, Addresses, and Internet Sites 438(4)
Appendix D Assessment Tools 442(6)
Appendix E Discipline Prevention and Intervention Strategies 448(2)
Appendix F Bibliography of Recommended Reading and Viewing 450(9)
Seed Strategies Index 459(3)
Subject Index 462(10)
About the Author 472

Excerpts

The arts do matter in their own right . . . but also as instruments of cognitive growth and development and as agents of motivation for school success. In this light, unfair access to the arts for our children brings consequences of major importance to our society. (Catterall, Chapleau, & Iwanaga, 1999) THE PURPOSE OF THIS BOOK Since the events of September 11, 2001, we now look at our work in education with a different eye. Of what value will higher student achievement on standardized measures be if our children aren't safe? What can educators do to prepare students to be more adept at solving the unknown problems ahead of them? How can renewed feelings of patriotism be coupled with increased respect for the diverse peoples of the world? How can children be taught democratic values for freedom and justice using pedagogic processes consistent with these values--methods that encourage students to think openly, take risks, consider choices, and make fair decisions? As we face these teaching challenges in the 21st century, we see a greater need to use our innate creative problem-solving abilities than at any other time in history. The fixture beckons with a plethora of educational promises and problems. Our challenge is to digest the growing mountain of learning research and convert it to thoughtful, artful practice. One thing we have learned through the ages is that human beings are at their best when laughing, dancing, singing, painting, potting, and pretending. The most important aspects of civilization are preserved not in percentiles, stanines, or grades, but in imaginative literature, art, drama, dance, and music. And these are the ancient learning rhythms that draw contemporary children. The arts were, and remain, the most basic and most essential forms of human communication. The arts are ways to create meaning about our deepest feelings and most significant thoughts. To ignore or minimize their value by compartmentalizing them in our classrooms into "specials" on Tuesdays or an annual class play is to deny their power in teaching and learning. This is why increasing numbers of schools have chosen to integrate the arts as primary strategies to increase student achievement, especially in reading and writing. A substantial body of research supporting the impact of the arts on learning is now readily available through publications such asChampions of Change: The Impact of the Arts on Learning(Fiske, 1999). The goal of this text, the second edition ofCreating Meaning Through Literature and the Arts,is to help pre-service education majors and practicing teachers meaningfully integrate literature, art, drama, dance, and music throughout the curriculum by providing a basic knowledge of the arts, clear reasons for integration, and specific how-to arts integration principles. Teachingwith,about,in,andthroughthe arts implies an alternative approach to the traditional role of classroom teachers who teach science, social studies, math, and language arts/reading using the arts only as enjoyable add-on activities. It is no longer thinkable to cram children into rows of desks and allow them to see school as a lifeless, dull place compared to an outside world filled with emotional and stimulating visual images, concert-quality CDs and entertainment, and fashion designs produced by creative geniuses. It is our role as teachers to make school every bit as engaging, with compelling stories, songs, images, and movement in all lessons. Because this is an introductory text, I have used my background in alternative learning strategies and many years in undergraduate teacher education to scaffold for readers with structuring devices, repetition, use of examples, and mnemonic devices. My hope is to empower readers to use their own creative abilities to discover patterns and use the ordinary in extraordinary ways in their teach


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