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Creative Thinking and Arts-Based Learning : Preschool Through Fourth Grade,9780131188310
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Creative Thinking and Arts-Based Learning : Preschool Through Fourth Grade

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131188310

ISBN10:
0131188313
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $80.00
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Summary

Creative Thinking and Arts-Based Learning prepares preservice and inservice teachers to know why children's creative thinking and play are so important, know about children's play and creative thinking, and also know how to provide these experiences within the curriculum. It contains extensive coverage of the roles, responsibilities, and strategies that lead to a more child-centered, play-based curriculum. An Applied Approach Many instructional guidelines and classroom strategies are presented throughout the text for integrating creative thinking and play into learning. Cases about preschoolers, K-2nd graders, and 3rd-4th graders open each chapter and show readers how teachers infuse the arts into learning. Meeting Standards. This new feature discusses how to provide for creativity in classrooms while also meeting state and national standards. Frequently Asked Questions. Another new feature poses common questions about issues, such as what materials and resources to use, how to adapt environments for diverse learners, and how to foster and assess creative thought. Misconceptions are dispelled with research-based answers. A Theoretical Approach Solid theory underlies all of the content. The authors' experience as university professors and practitioners is evident in their clear presentation of relevant theory. A Reflective Approach Teacher's Reflections in each chapter tell readers what other preservice and inservice teachers are thinking and doing in their classrooms relative to their experiences with the arts. Resources: Instructor's Manual and test Bank, PowerPoint Slides

Table of Contents

Part 1 Foundations of Creative Thought
1(78)
Understanding Children's Creative Thought and Expression
2(36)
Classroom Perspectives on Creativity
3(1)
Defining Creative Thought
4(3)
Theoretical and Research Base: Multiple Intelligences
7(1)
Teachers' Reflections on Creativity
8(5)
Creative Thinking During Childhood
13(4)
Imagination and Fantasy
14(2)
Modes of Thinking
16(1)
Stages in the Creative Process
16(1)
Identifying Creativity
17(1)
Children's Creative Abilities
18(3)
Unlocking Creative Potential
21(2)
Psychological Safety
22(1)
Psychological Freedom
23(1)
Social Support
23(1)
Creativity and Education
23(2)
Schools That Nurture Creativity
25(3)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities in Promoting Creative Expression
28(1)
Meeting Standards: Criteria for Creativity
29(5)
Conclusion
34(1)
Frequently Asked Questions About Creativity
35(3)
Supporting Children's Play, Games, and Inventions
38(41)
Classroom Perspectives on Play, Games, and Inventions
39(1)
Theoretical and Research Base: What Is Play?
40(5)
Characteristics of Play
40(1)
Controversies Surrounding Play
41(3)
The Educational Role of Play
44(1)
Teachers' Reflections on Play, Games, and Inventions
45(1)
Why Is Play Important?
46(10)
Cognitive Development
47(1)
Language Development
48(2)
Literacy Development
50(3)
Social and Emotional Development
53(1)
Physical Development
54(1)
Creative Development
55(1)
How Does Play Develop?
56(8)
Developmental Stages of Cognitive Play
56(7)
Developmental Stages of Social Play
63(1)
Why Do Children Play?
64(3)
Classical Theories
65(1)
Modern Theories
65(2)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
67(4)
Why Should Teachers Intervene in Children's Play?
68(1)
When Should Teachers Intervene in Children's Play?
68(1)
What Are Teachers' Roles in Children's Play?
68(3)
Meeting Standards: Integrating Play Experiences Across Ages and Content Areas in Inquiry-Based Units on ``Change''
71(4)
Frequently Asked Questions About Play, Games, and Inventions
75(4)
Part 2 The Fine Arts
79(140)
Promoting Children's Art
80(52)
Marilyn J. Narey
Classroom Perspectives on Art
81(2)
Defining Children's Art and Aesthetic Experiences
83(2)
Theoretical and Research Base: Art as a Language and the Schools of Reggio Emilia
85(4)
Teachers' Reflections on Art
89(3)
How Children Learn Through Art
92(4)
Developmental Sequence for Children's Art
94(2)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
96(24)
Responding Appropriately to Children's Art
108(2)
Locating Resources and Storing Materials
110(6)
Displaying Children's Art
116(1)
Talking About Art
117(3)
Meeting Standards: Interdisciplinary Curriculum and Key Experiences in the Arts
120(8)
Frequently Asked Questions About Art in the Curriculum
128(2)
Conclusion
130(2)
Engaging Children in Music, Movement, and Dance
132(44)
Laurie Nicholson Stamp
Classroom Perspectives on Music, Movement, and Dance
133(1)
Understanding Music, Movement, and Dance
134(2)
Historical Influences on Music, Movement, and Dance for Children
136(3)
Theoretical and Research Base: Brain Research, Music, and Dance
139(4)
Essential Understandings About Music, Movement, and Dance
143(3)
Contributions of Music, Movement, and Dance to Children's Learning
146(7)
Psychomotor Development
146(1)
Perceptual Skills
147(4)
Emotional and Social Development
151(1)
Cognitive Skills
152(1)
Multicultural Development
152(1)
Aesthetic Awareness
152(1)
Teachers' Reflections on Music, Movement, and Dance
153(1)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
154(10)
Teachers as Motivators
154(3)
Teachers as Planners
157(5)
Teachers as Facilitators
162(1)
Teachers as Observers
163(1)
Meeting Standards: Music Educators National Conference and National Dance Standards
164(8)
Conclusion
172(1)
Frequently Asked Questions About Music and Dance
173(3)
Inviting Children's Participation in the Dramatic Arts
176(43)
Classroom Perspectives on Children's Participation in the Dramatic Arts
177(1)
Theoretical and Research Base: What Do We Mean by Dramatic Arts?
178(2)
Teachers' Reflections on the Dramatic Arts
180(4)
The Meaning of Enactment
180(2)
Forms of Enactment
182(2)
The Importance of the Dramatic Arts in the Curriculum
184(2)
Criteria for Integrating the Dramatic Arts into the Curriculum
186(2)
Selecting and Presenting Appropriate Drama Experiences and Materials
186(2)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
188(1)
Appropriate Dramatic Arts Activities and Experiences
189(18)
Dramatic and Sociodramatic Play
189(5)
Story Play
194(3)
Pantomime
197(2)
Puppets
199(3)
Story Drama
202(2)
Readers' Theater
204(3)
Integrating Dramatic Arts into the Subject Areas
207(5)
Mathematics, Science, and Technology
207(2)
Language, Literature, and Literacy
209(1)
Social Studies, Health, and Nutrition
210(2)
Meeting Standards: Integrating Dramatic Arts Experiences Across Ages and Content Areas
212(3)
Frequently Asked Questions About the Dramatic Arts
215(4)
Part 3 Creative Teaching
219(207)
Planning and Managing the Classroom Environment
220(48)
Classroom Perspectives on the Classroom Environment
221(1)
Theoretical and Research Base: Features of Quality Classroom Environments
222(5)
Climate
223(2)
Space
225(1)
Time
226(1)
Teachers' Reflections on Classroom Environments
227(2)
Planning and Managing the Indoor Environment
229(1)
Features of Quality Indoor Environments
230(16)
Room Arrangement
230(1)
Centers
231(15)
Planning and Managing the Outdoor Environment
246(14)
Types of Playgrounds
249(1)
Features of Quality Outdoor Environments
250(7)
Outdoor Environments for Children of Different Ages and with Diverse Needs
257(2)
Accommodating Children with Exceptional Needs in the Outdoor Environment
259(1)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
260(1)
Meeting Standards: Classroom Environments
261(3)
Frequently Asked Questions About Classroom Environments
264(4)
Using Classroom Materials and Resources Effectively
268(46)
Classroom Perspectives on Materials and Resources
269(1)
Theoretical and Research Base: The Importance of Materials and Resources
270(4)
History of Toys and Playthings
270(1)
Convergent and Divergent Play Materials
271(2)
Selection and Use of Safe Materials
273(1)
Teachers' Reflections on Materials and Resources
274(1)
Types of Materials
275(3)
Skill/Concept Materials
276(1)
Gross Motor Materials
276(1)
Manipulative Materials
276(1)
Construction Materials
276(1)
Self-Expressive Materials
277(1)
Natural and Everyday Materials
277(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Materials
278(11)
Infants and Toddlers
278(5)
Preschoolers and Kindergartners
283(4)
First-Through Fourth-Graders
287(2)
Technology Materials, Creative Thinking, Play, and the Arts
289(3)
Appropriate Software
290(1)
The Internet
291(1)
Other Divergent Materials and Resources
292(6)
Blocks
293(2)
Modeling Materials
295(1)
Sand and Water
296(2)
Organized Games
298(3)
What Is a Game?
298(1)
The Value of Games
298(1)
Competition Versus Cooperation
299(2)
Child-Constructed Games
301(3)
Invented Games
301(1)
Making Games with Children
302(2)
Meeting Standards: Using Classroom Materials and Resources Effectively
304(5)
Frequently Asked Questions About Materials and Resources
309(5)
Fostering Creative Thought and Expression
314(36)
Classroom Perspectives on Fostering Creative Thought and Expression
315(2)
Theoretical and Research Base: Fostering Creative Thought
317(4)
Constructivism
317(1)
Humanism
318(1)
Behaviorism and Social-Learning Theory
318(1)
An Electic Approach
319(2)
Teachers' Reflections on Fostering Creative Thought
321(1)
Your Role in Fostering Creative Growth
322(1)
Styles of Adult-Child Interactions
322(4)
Autocratic Interactions
322(1)
Permissive Interactions
323(1)
Democratic Interactions
323(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Guidance
326(3)
Fostering Prosocial Behavior
326(3)
Understanding Children's Conflicts
329(4)
Causes of Conflict
329(1)
Types of Conflicts
330(1)
Helping Children Resolve Conflicts
330(3)
Strategies for Fostering Creative Thought and Expression
333(5)
Inquiry- and Problem-Based Learning Groups
333(1)
Investigative Play
334(2)
Project Work
336(2)
Meeting Standards: Fostering Creative Thought and Expression
338(7)
Frequently Asked Questions About Fostering Creative Thought and Expression
345(5)
Assessing the Creative Processes and Products of Children
350(46)
Marilyn J. Narey
Classroom Perspectives on Assessment of Creative Work
351(2)
Assessment Challenges in Creativity and the Arts
353(3)
Theoretical and Research Base: Identification of Talent and Giftedness
356(4)
Teachers' Reflections on Assessment
360(1)
Assessment: Why, What, and How
360(3)
Why Assess: Identifying the Purpose
361(1)
What to Assess: Finding a Focus
362(1)
How to Assess: Selecting the Approach
362(1)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
363(24)
The Role of Observer
363(5)
The Role of Interactor
368(5)
The Role of Evaluator
373(14)
Published Scales
387(1)
Rethinking Assessment in Creativity and the Arts
387(1)
Meeting Standards: Assessment of Creative Works
388(4)
Frequently Asked Questions About Assessment
392(4)
Developing an Appreciation for Children's Creative Work in Diverse Families and Communities
396(30)
Classroom Perspectives on Culture, Family, and the Arts
397(2)
Defining Cultural Perspectives on Creativity and the Arts
399(6)
The Influence of Parents and Families on Talent
403(1)
The Influence of Peer Culture on Talent
403(2)
Theoretical and Research Base: Social Capital Theory
405(3)
Teachers' Reflections on Creativity, Families, and Communities
408(5)
Brain Research and Creative Thinking
409(1)
How Basic Is Creative Thinking?
410(3)
Teachers' Roles and Responsibilities
413(5)
Meeting Standards: Multicultural Education and the Arts
418(4)
Conclusion
422(1)
Frequently Asked Questions About Creativity, Diverse Families, and Communities
423(3)
Appendix A: Dance Prop Box 426(3)
Appendix B: Published Rating Scales to Evaluate Preschool Settings 429(2)
Appendix C: Noncompetitive Games for Children 431(6)
Appendix D: Observations of Medical Play 437(4)
Appendix E: Case Study: Dittos and Elegant Costumes 441(3)
Appendix F: Resources for Play Materials 444(2)
References 446(14)
Children's Books, Recordings, and Software 460(5)
Glossary 465(4)
Index 469


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