9780335205486

Crime and Law in Media Culture

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780335205486

  • ISBN10:

    0335205488

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-03-01
  • Publisher: Open University Press
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Summary

* Can we any longer 'separate out' crime, the law, and the media? * What does contemporary media culture do to our understanding of crime and the law? * What is the impact of cyberculture on crime and the law? This book explores the situating of law and crime within the vast range and scope of contemporary media forms. It begins from the premise that the whole of society, including crime and criminal justice, is embraced by media culture. 'The media' are viewed not as a set of institutions, but as a myriad of communicative forms or expressive techniques ranging from soaps to cyberworlds. Sheila Brown shows how crime and the law, or our understanding of them, are produced, reproduced, disturbed, and challenged in and through media culture. A lively and engaging text, this book contains a wide range of topical examples and provides a theoretically coherent examination of the field, providing an accessible critique of cultural theory along the way. It opens up the boundaries between the more traditional aspects of law and criminology, and the broader concerns of sociology and cultural studies. The result will be essential reading for students and a key reference for researchers as well as those with a wider interest in crime and the media.

Author Biography

Sheila Brown is Lecturer in Criminology at the Faculty of Law, University of Sheffield and has lectured in sociology and criminology since 1989. Formerly known for her challenging work in the field of youth and crime, over the past few years she has been researching the ways in which crime and law are embedded in everyday life through media cultures. Travels through the USA, cyberspace, TV, cinemas and crime fiction have been used as research journeys to explore the boundaries between fact and fiction in crime and the law. She is currently researching in the areas of science and crime, and mobile phone cultures.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements vii
Mediatization, modernity and globalization: crime and law in media culture?
1(38)
Approaching media, crime, and culture
1(2)
Thought-crime prevention? Early conceptions of the mass and the media
3(5)
Media messaging in modernity
8(3)
The global soul? Globalization, identity and media culture
11(5)
The emergence of the media hybrid
16(7)
The academe and the study of media, crime and law
23(1)
Modern media and the criminological project: dichotomies and dilemmas
24(15)
Real crime/crime stories: the collapse of fantasy and fact?
39(39)
Crime: metaphorically speaking, a practice?
40(7)
Crime dramas: the collapse of the `real'?
47(17)
Will the missing context please stand up? `Implosion' and its problems
64(14)
Novel forms, dramatic scenes: crime and law in popular culture
78(29)
Reading crime fiction: crime in popular culture
79(11)
Reading law film
90(12)
Reading the fictive: doing the culture
102(5)
Does splatter matter? Representing violence, regulating consumption
107(30)
A passionate cause: the splatter effect
108(6)
Representing violence and the body
114(9)
Contestation and cultures of violence
123(6)
The political and the aesthetic: gendered violence
129(6)
Does splatter (still) matter?
135(2)
(S)talking in cyberspace: virtuality, crime and law
137(37)
Cyberspace and cybercultures: approaching the prosthetic
138(7)
Crime, law and the cyber
145(21)
The virtual/real: where does it leave crime and law?
166(8)
Crime, law and media futures
174(23)
Cartographic convolutions? The media mapping of crime and law
175(9)
Beyond and outside the postmodern
184(5)
Crime and law in media culture
189(4)
Entailments, ethics and crime, law, media, futures
193(4)
Notes 197(3)
References 200(11)
Index 211

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