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Criminal Behavior : A Psychological Approach,9780131850491
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Criminal Behavior : A Psychological Approach

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780131850491

ISBN10:
0131850490
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $98.00
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Summary

Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach, Seventh Edition presents a critical and interdisciplinary look at criminals and crime, challenging students to look beyond over-simplified or prejudicial conclusions about the "crime problem." The book considers the behavioral, emotional and cognitive aspects of criminals, looks at specific criminal offenses, and explores the causes, classification, prediction, intervention and treatment of criminal behavior. NEW TO THE SEVENTH EDITION Greatly expanded and reorganized coverage of criminal profiling More information about careers in forensic psychology and correctional psychology Updated chapters on the psychopath, juvenile delinquency, the mentally disordered offender, and correctional psychology An updated chapter on drugs and crime that reflects the latest drug abuse research Expanded coverage of: crime scene analysis, cyber crime, the effects of the mass media on aggression, crime & physical anomalies, gender differences in aggression, infanticide, and robbery Numerous new tables, figures, charts, and other in-text learning aids

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Introduction to Criminal Behavior
1(34)
Perspectives on Human Nature in Theories of Crime
3(2)
Perspectives in Criminology
5(5)
Sociological Criminology
5(1)
Psychological Criminology
6(2)
Psychiatric Criminology
8(2)
Definition of Criminal Behavior
10(1)
FBI Reporting Systems
11(12)
Uniform Crime Reporting System
11(5)
National Incident-Based Reporting System
16(3)
Hate Crimes
19(1)
Terrorism
20(3)
Self-Report Studies
23(3)
Drug Abuse Self-Report Surveys
25(1)
Victimization Surveys
26(6)
Stalking
28(3)
Cyberstalking
31(1)
The Focus of the Book
32(3)
Juvenile Delinquency: Developmental Factors
35(46)
A Brief History of Juvenile Justice
36(4)
Definition of Juvenile Delinquency
40(3)
The Nature and Extent of Juvenile Offending
43(7)
Data on Serious Juvenile Offending
46(4)
School Crime
50(2)
The Serious Delinquent
52(1)
Social Risk Factors
53(6)
Poverty and Social Class
53(2)
Peer Experiences
55(1)
Preschool and School Experiences
56(1)
Family Background
56(1)
Parental Disciplinary Practices
57(2)
Psychological Risk Factors
59(9)
Developmental Factors
59(5)
Hyperactivity and Attention Deficit Disorder
64(2)
Conduct Disorders
66(2)
Intelligence and Delinquency
68(3)
Gender and Juvenile Offending
71(2)
Prevention and Treatment of Juvenile Offending
73(5)
Summary and Conclusions
78(3)
Origins of Criminal Behavior: Biological Factors
81(37)
The Born Criminal
82(3)
Physique and Crime
85(7)
Attractiveness
88(2)
Minimal Physical Anomalies
90(2)
Twin Studies
92(4)
Adoption Studies
96(3)
Eysenck's Theory of Personality and Crime
99(16)
Extraversion
101(4)
Neuroticism
105(2)
Psychoticism
107(1)
Crime and Conditionability
108(3)
The Evidence for Eysenck's Theory
111(4)
Summary and Conclusions
115(3)
The Psychopath: A Focus on Biopsychological Factors
118(44)
Historical Background
118(5)
Examples of Psychopaths
121(2)
Behavioral Descriptions
123(4)
The Criminal Psychopath
127(1)
Prevalence of Criminal Psychopathy
127(1)
Offending Patterns of Criminal Psychopaths
127(1)
Psychological Measures of Psychopathy
128(3)
Core Factors of Psychopathy
130(1)
Recidivism
131(1)
Treatment and Rehabilitation Strategies
132(1)
The Female Psychopath
133(2)
Racial/Ethnic Differences
135(1)
Juvenile Psychopathy
135(4)
Psychophysiological Differences
139(18)
Basic Neurophysiological Concepts and Terminology
139(1)
Central Nervous System Differences
140(2)
EEG Research on Psychopaths
142(3)
Hemisphere Asymmetry and Deficiency
145(2)
Frontal Lobe Neuropsychological Studies
147(1)
Stimulation Seeking
148(1)
Optimal Arousal of the Cerebral Cortex
149(3)
Peripheral Nervous System Research
152(1)
Autonomic Nervous System Research
153(4)
The Childhood of the Psychopath
157(2)
Summary and Conclusions
159(3)
Origins of Criminal Behavior: Learning and Situational Factors
162(25)
Behaviorism
163(5)
Social Learning
168(7)
Expectancy Theory
170(1)
Imitational Aspects of Social Learning
171(1)
Differential Association-Reinforcement Theory
172(3)
Frustration-Induced Criminality
175(2)
Situational Instigators and Regulators of Criminal Behavior
177(8)
Authority as an Instigator of Criminal Behavior
178(3)
Deindividuation
181(3)
Moral Disengagement
184(1)
Summary and Conclusions
185(2)
Crime and Mental Disorders
187(50)
Defining Mental Illness
188(10)
The DSM-IV
189(3)
Schizophrenic Disorders
192(2)
Delusional Disorders
194(1)
Depressive Disorders
195(1)
Antisocial Personality Disorder
195(3)
Mental Disorders and Violence
198(5)
Police and the Mentally Disordered
200(1)
Mental Disorders Among the Incarcerated
201(2)
Mentally Disordered Defendants and Offenders
203(14)
Incompetent to Stand Trial
203(4)
The Mentally Disordered and Criminal Responsibility
207(8)
The Mentally Disordered Sex Offender
215(1)
Mentally Disordered Inmates and Transfers
216(1)
Mental Disorders as Unique Defenses
217(8)
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
218(2)
Pathological Gambler's Syndrome
220(1)
Dissociative Identity Disorder
221(3)
Amnesia
224(1)
Dangerousness and the Assessment of Risk
225(9)
Current Risk Assessment Measures
232(2)
Summary and Conclusions
234(3)
Human Aggression and Violence
237(44)
Defining Aggression
239(2)
Theoretical Perspectives on Aggression
241(10)
Psychoanalytical/Psychodynamic Viewpoints
241(1)
Ethological Viewpoints
242(2)
Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis
244(3)
Excitation Transfer Theory
247(1)
Aggressive Driving
247(1)
Social Learning
248(3)
Cognitive Models of Aggression
251(3)
Overt and Covert Acts of Aggression
254(4)
Reactive and Proactive Forms of Aggression
256(1)
Gender Differences in Aggression
257(1)
Environmental Factors
258(5)
Population Density
258(1)
Aggression and Ambient Temperature
259(3)
Other Environmental Factors
262(1)
Effects of the Mass Media
263(3)
Victim-Precipitated Aggression
266(1)
The Physiology of Aggression
267(11)
Premenstrual Syndrome
268(2)
Physiological Control Through Surgery and Drugs
270(5)
Brain Pathology and Aggression
275(1)
Heredity and the XYY Chromosome
276(2)
Epilepsy and Violence
278(1)
Summary and Conclusions
278(3)
Homicide, Assault, and Family Violence
281(45)
Definitions
284(2)
Sociological Correlates of Homicide
286(11)
Race/Ethnic Origin
286(2)
Gender Differences
288(1)
Age
289(1)
Socioeconomic Class
290(1)
Victim--Offender Relationship
290(3)
Weapons
293(1)
Other Factors
294(1)
Sniper Attacks
295(2)
Sociological Correlates of Assault
297(1)
Family Violence
298(24)
A Brief History of the Modern Era of Family Violence
300(2)
Incidence, Prevalence, and Demographics of Child Abuse and Neglect
302(1)
Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrown-Away Children
303(2)
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy
305(1)
Shaken Baby Syndrome
306(1)
Prevalence, Incidence, and Nature of Intimate Partner Abuse
307(1)
Same-Sex Domestic Violence
308(1)
Prevalence, Incidence, and Nature of Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly
308(2)
Sibling and Child-to-Parent Abuse
310(1)
Multiassaultive Families
311(1)
Etiology
312(3)
Is Family Violence Different From General Violence?
315(1)
Battered Woman Syndrome
316(1)
Psychological Effects of Domestic Violence on Children
317(2)
Infanticide, Neonaticide, and Filicide
319(3)
Theoretical Explanations of Family Violence
322(1)
Cessation of Family Violence
322(2)
Summary and Conclusions
324(2)
Criminal Homicide: A Closer Look
326(42)
Investigative Methods
326(3)
Profiling
329(8)
Criminal Profiling
331(3)
Geographical Profiling
334(1)
The Psychological Autopsy
335(1)
Racial Profiling
335(2)
Multiple Murderers
337(1)
Serial Murderers
338(6)
Types of Serial Murderers
342(2)
Mass Murderers
344(4)
Classic Mass Murder
344(1)
Product-Tampering Homicide
345(1)
Workplace Violence
346(2)
Terrorism
348(6)
Definitions
348(1)
Psychosocial Context
349(1)
Motives
350(3)
Consequences
353(1)
Psychological Factors in General Violent Crime
354(4)
Impulsive Violence
354(2)
Overcontrolled and Undercontrolled Offenders
356(2)
Cognitive Self-Regulation and Violence
358(4)
Deindividuation and Crowd Violence
362(3)
Summary and Conclusions
365(3)
Sexual Offenses
368(53)
Legislation on Sex Offenders
370(2)
Rape
372(24)
Definitions
372(1)
Date Rape
373(1)
Incidence and Prevalence
374(4)
Situational and Victimization Characteristics
378(1)
Offender Characteristics
379(4)
Classification of Rape Patterns
383(4)
The MTC:R3
387(2)
The Groth Typology
389(2)
Etiology
391(3)
Rape and Pornography
394(2)
Pedophilia
396(14)
Incidence and Prevalence
396(1)
Situational and Victimization Characteristics
397(2)
Offender Characteristics
399(2)
Classification of Child Offender Patterns
401(2)
The MTC:CM3
403(2)
The Groth Classification Model
405(1)
Recidivism
406(1)
Etiology
407(3)
Exhibitionism
410(3)
Situational Characteristics
411(1)
Offender Characteristics
411(2)
Voyeurism and Fetishism
413(2)
Treatment of Sexual Offenders
415(4)
Summary and Conclusions
419(2)
Economic Crime, Public Order Crime, and Other Crime
421(58)
Burglary
424(8)
Burglary Cues and Selected Targets
426(2)
Who Burglarizes?
428(1)
Use of Alcohol and Other Substances
429(1)
What Happens to the Merchandise?
429(1)
Motives
430(1)
Psychological Impact of Burglary
431(1)
Larceny and Motor Vehicle Theft
432(2)
Fraud and Identity Theft
434(1)
Shoplifting
435(6)
Who Shoplifts?
436(1)
Motives
437(1)
Methods of Shoplifting
438(1)
Types of Shoplifters
438(3)
Prostitution
441(6)
Motives
444(3)
Robbery
447(6)
Bank Robbery
448(1)
Robbery: Economic Crime Or Violent Crime?
449(4)
White-Collar and Occupational Crime
453(7)
Corporate Crime
456(2)
Individual Occupational Crime
458(2)
Cybercrime
460(1)
Hostage-Taking Offenses
461(5)
Arson
466(8)
Incidence and Prevalence
467(1)
Motives
468(2)
Pyromania
470(2)
Repetitive and Persistent Arsonists
472(2)
Bombings
474(1)
Motives
474(3)
Summary and Conclusions
477(2)
Drugs and Crime
479(45)
Major Categories of Drugs
485(3)
The Hallucinogens: Cannabis
488(6)
Historical Background
489(2)
Cannabis and Crime
491(2)
Phencyclidine (PCP)
493(1)
The Stimulants
494(10)
Amphetamines
494(3)
Cocaine
497(2)
Stimulants, Cocaine, and Crime
499(2)
Crack
501(1)
MDMA
502(2)
Narcotic Drugs
504(5)
Heroin
505(2)
Heroin and Crime
507(1)
Other Narcotic Drugs
508(1)
The Depressants
509(13)
GHB and Rohypnol: The Club Drugs
509(3)
Inhalants
512(1)
Alcohol
513(2)
Alcohol and Crime
515(7)
Summary and Conclusions
522(2)
Correctional Psychology
524(29)
Careers in Correctional Psychology
526(2)
The Correctional System
528(5)
Societal Rationale for Punishment of Offenders
533(2)
Classification and Prediction
535(3)
Classification Systems
536(2)
Psychological Effects of Imprisonment
538(5)
Psychological Effects of Crowding
539(2)
Psychological Effects of Isolation
541(2)
Treatment and Rehabilitation
543(7)
Psychotherapy
546(1)
Behavior Therapy
546(2)
Cognitive Therapy
548(2)
Summary and Conclusions
550(3)
Glossary 553(16)
Cases Cited 569(2)
References 571(66)
Index 637

Excerpts

Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approachis a textbook about crime from a psychological perspective. More specifically, this text portrays the criminal offender as embedded in and continually influenced by multiple systems within the psychosocial environment. One focus of this book is that meaningful theory, well-executed research, and skillful application of knowledge to the "crime problem" require an understanding of the many levels of events that influence a person's life course--from the individual to the individual's family, peers, schools, neighborhoods, community, culture, and society as a whole. Like earlier editions, the seventh edition views criminal offenders as existing on a continuum, ranging from serious, repetitive offenders who begin their criminal careers at a very early age to occasional offenders who offend at some point during their life course, usually during adolescence. The book reviews the contemporary research, theory, and practice concerning the psychology of crime as comprehensively and accurately as possible. The behavioral, emotional, and cognitive aspects of crime are examined, from the perspective of both the offender and the victim. The book also reviews current research that focuses on the cognitive aspects of criminal offenders, delving into their perceptions, reasoning, beliefs, decision making, and attitudes. The causes, classification, prediction, prevention, intervention, and treatment of criminal behavior are also examined. The organization and structure of the text remain basically the same as in earlier editions. The organization of the text runs from the broad, theoretical aspects of crime to specific offense categories. Developmental and biopsychological positions are presented in the early chapters, whereas social learning and cognitive aspects come later. Nonetheless, many changes were made to reflect legislative and judicial trends, student interests, and rapidly expanding research and theory on the psychology of crime. This edition includes completely rewritten chapters on mental disorders (Chapter 6), the psychopath (Chapter 4), and correctional psychology (Chapter 13). The chapter on drugs and crime (Chapter 12) has been extensively updated to include ever-changing trends in drug abuse and evolving survey research on that abuse. After the events of September 11, 2001, sections on international and domestic terrorism (including bioterrorism) were added to Chapters I and 9. The section Criminal profiling, on (Chapter 9) has been greatly expanded, rewritten, updated, and reorganized. Also added are sections on sniper attacks (Chapter 8), developmental risk factors for juvenile delinquency (Chapter 2), moral disengagement (Chapter 5), reactive and proactive forms of aggression (Chapter 7), same-sex domestic violence (Chapter 8), and missing, abducted, runaway, and thrown-away children (Chapter 8). The sections on the effects of mass media on aggression (Chapter 7), crime and physical anomalies (Chapter 3), gender differences in aggression, infanticide (Chapter 8), and robbery (Chapter 11) have been greatly expanded. Crime data and statistics have been updated and expanded throughout the text, and the number of tables, figures, and pedagogical aids has increased from that in the previous edition. This text is designed to be a core text in undergraduate and graduate courses in criminal behavior, criminology, the psychology of crime, crime and delinquency, and forensic psychology. The book is heavily research-based and provides a readable summary of contemporary research in all areas of crime. Most of the research is presented within a theoretical context and thematic structure to give an organized flow to the coverage of the many topics. The book's major goal is to encourage an appreciation of the many complex issues surrounding criminal behavior and to avoid oversimplified, prejudicial, dogmatic conclusions about the "crime problem." If, after stu


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