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Criminal Investigation : Basic Perspectives,9780130942081
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Criminal Investigation : Basic Perspectives

by ;
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780130942081

ISBN10:
0130942081
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $98.20
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Summary

Together, the authors of Criminal Investigation: Basic Perspectives have in excess of fifty years of law enforcement experience with a variety of agencies such as the United States Postal Inspection Service, the United States Marshal's Service, the Sacramento Sheriff's Department, the New York Police Department and the California State Police. From this perspective the authors have written a well-balanced, comprehensive text on criminal investigation.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
PART 1 Elements of Investigation 1(180)
Ethical Awareness
2(10)
Ethical Awareness and Morality
3(1)
Pre-employment Assessment
4(1)
Crime and Outrageous Conduct
4(1)
Impact on Criminal Investigation
5(1)
Standards for Investigators of Crime
5(1)
Prevention
5(1)
Case Study: The Special Crime Squad
6(6)
The Crime Scene
12(23)
The Legal Significance of Evidence
13(1)
Securing the Crime Scene
13(2)
Systematic Search Procedures
15(11)
Handling Infected Evidence
26(1)
Physical Changes at the Scene
26(1)
Final Survey of the Scene
27(1)
Media Relations
28(1)
Case Study: Incredible Evidence
29(6)
Witnesses and Evidence
35(24)
Locating Witnesses at the Crime Scene
35(3)
Plea for Public Cooperation
38(1)
Interviewing Witnesses
39(7)
Evidence
46(11)
Case Study: Robbery Interview
57(2)
Recording the Crime Scene
59(21)
Recording the Crime Scene
59(13)
Progress Reports: The Continuing Investigation
72(1)
Case Study: The Lucky Market Case
73(7)
Basic Investigative Leads and Informants
80(28)
Basic Leads
80(13)
Informants
93(6)
Case Study: The Shugars and Smith Case
99(9)
Major Investigative Techniques
108(23)
Surveillance
108(7)
Police Intelligence: Criminal Investigation Information
115(2)
Proactive Investigation
117(1)
Polygraph Testing
117(3)
Undercover Police Agents
120(1)
Lineups
120(3)
Case Study: The Brown Case
123(8)
Laboratory and Technical Services
131(15)
Criminalistics: Forensic Science
132(1)
DNA Fingerprinting
133(1)
Laboratory Determinations
134(4)
Laboratory Equipment
138(3)
Voiceprint Identification
141(1)
Cryptography
142(2)
Case Study: Child Abduction Case
144(2)
Interrogation of Suspects
146(11)
Time and Place of Interrogation
146(1)
Custodial Interrogation: The Mirada Warning
147(2)
Interrogation Structure
149(2)
Written Statement (Confession) of a Suspect
151(1)
The Suspect's Dilemma: The Crime Partner
152(1)
Audiotaping of Suspect or Witness
152(1)
Videotaping of Suspects
153(1)
Case Study: Interrogation, Robbery Suspect
154(3)
Arresting the Accused Person
157(24)
The Broadcast Alarm or Pickup Order
157(2)
Records as Sources of Information
159(1)
Wanted Notices
160(3)
The Arrest
163(1)
Pedigree
164(2)
Case Preparation
166(1)
The Identity of the Defendant
167(1)
The Defendant and the Corpus Delicti
168(1)
Negative Evidence
168(1)
Lawful Procedures
169(1)
Arraying Evidence
169(1)
The ``Package'' or Case Folder
170(1)
The Decision to Charge
170(1)
Closing an Investigation
171(2)
Case Study: Double Murder-Ms. Wylie and Hoffert
173(8)
PART 2 Investigating Major Crimes 181(162)
Physical Assaults
182(25)
Homicide
182(16)
Assaults
198(2)
Child Abuse
200(3)
Case Study: Autopsy Surgeon
203(4)
Sexual Assaults
207(17)
Rape
207(8)
Child Sexual Abuse
215(6)
Case Study: The East Area Rapist
221(3)
Robbery
224(15)
The Target in Robberies
229(1)
Identification Evidence
230(1)
Checklist for the Investigation of Robbery
231(2)
Repeat-Offender Cases
233(1)
Carjacking
234(1)
Problems of Proof
235(1)
Case Study: This Is a Hold-up!
236(3)
Arson, Bombings, and Hate Crimes
239(19)
Arson
239(12)
Bombings
251(2)
Hate Crimes
253(1)
Case Study: Motive for Arson
254(4)
Property Crimes
258(33)
Burglary
258(7)
Theft
265(10)
Fraud
275(13)
Case Study: The Year My Life Was Stolen
288(3)
A Trio of Crimes Without Victims-Dangerous Drugs, Vice and Gambling, and Organized Crime
291(25)
Dangerous Drugs
291(14)
Vice and Gambling
305(1)
Organized Crime
306(5)
Case Study: Dangerous Drugs Law Enforcement-Roles and Story Lines
311(5)
For Other Authorities
316(20)
Terrorism
316(6)
Computer Crime
322(4)
Hit and Run
326(5)
Case Study: Basic Lead in Langley/CIA Shooting
331(5)
The Investigator as a Witness
336(7)
Action Prior to Court Appearance as a Witness
336(2)
General Behavior as a Witness
338(2)
Nonverbal Communication
340(1)
Conduct After Testifying
341(2)
Appendix A Case Briefs 343(5)
Appendix B Drugs 348(3)
Appendix C Identity Theft: What to Do if it Happens to You 351(3)
Glossary 354(4)
Selected Bibliography 358(3)
Index 361

Excerpts

The ninth edition ofCriminal Investigation: Basic Perspectiveshas been reorganized to make it more adaptable for a semester-length college course. The previous edition of this text contained 27 chapters. In this edition, the material has been combined and condensed into a 17 chapter format. The first chapter is now Ethical Awareness. This is especially appropriate due to the recent disclosure of unethical conduct in two of the largest police agencies in the country. This unethical conduct effects all investigators, regardless of jurisdiction. Such egregious conduct places doubts in a juror's mind regarding the credibility of the investigators in the courtroom and even empowers juries to engage in jury nullification. We believe that a frank and honest discussion of unethical conduct is necessary in order to acknowledge that this behavior exists and to be able to take corrective and preventive action. Therefore, we added one entirely new chapter as well as additional segments to eight existing chapters: Media Relations (Chapter 2, "The Crime Scene") Offender Registration (Chapter 5, "Basic Investigative Leads and Informants") DNA Fingerprinting (Chapter 7,,"Laboratory and Technical Services") Mass and Serial Murder (Chapter 10, "Physical Assaults") Personality Profile: Serial Rapist (Chapter 11, "Sexual Assaults") Vice and Gambling (Chapter 15, "A Trio of Crimes Without Victims, Dangerous Dugs, Vice and Gambling, and Organized Crime") Computer Crime and Hit and Run (Chapter 16, "For Other Authorities") The Investigator as a Witness (New Chapter 17) Two new case studies, designed to enhance the learning process, have been added to this edition. The case study method of instruction facilitates learning by linking case content to textbook topics and by encouraging the exchange of opinions and viewpoints among students during discussion sessions. The case studies in this book are designed to contribute to this type of learning process. Each case provides factual information that is likely to promote analysis and discussion and thus aid in developing the student's ability to analyze, evaluate, and reason. The topic of discussion is focused on the facts of each case study, but only the range of student opinions and ideas limits the scope of the discussion. Some cases are presented in straight narrative style, while others are written in dialogue form as the best means of joining the personalities and the situations of a case study. Each case presents a real-life situation or episode experienced some time in the past. There has been no "doctoring" to develop points, theories, or problems. However, names, dates, and locations have been altered in some instances to avoid embarrassing any persons or their families. A note of thanks to the reviewers of the last edition: William E. Kelly, Auburn University, Auburn, AL; Richard Natoli, Massasoit Community College, Rockton, MA; and Len Larson, Eastfield College, Mesquite, TX. Their insights and suggestions have made this current edition a better book. A special note of thanks to Sue Lushbaugh. Without her computer expertise and patience this edition would not have been possible.


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