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Criminological Theory : A Brief Introduction,9780205389032

Criminological Theory : A Brief Introduction

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ISBN13:

9780205389032

ISBN10:
0205389031
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $43.00
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Summary

This introductory primer on criminological theory provides an accessible discussion of the major theories of crime, delinquency, social deviance, and social control with an objective and neutral approach. The various theories are covered in a systematic fashion. After providing a straightforward explanation of each theory's fundamental assumptions and concepts, along with example narratives drawn from both real-world current events and fictitious scenarios, major criticisms are addressed. The implications of each theory for criminal and juvenile justice strategies and policy (e.g., deterrence vs. rehabilitation, crime prevention, crime prediction) are also considered.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Theoretical Criminology: An Introductory Overview
1(14)
The Origins and Evolution of Criminology
3(2)
The Nature of Theory
5(3)
Assessing Theory
8(2)
The Influence of General Social Perspectives on Theories of Crime
10(1)
The Role of Theory
11(1)
Summary
12(1)
Key Terms
12(1)
Discussion Questions
13(1)
References
13(2)
Classical Theory in Criminology
15(14)
Assumptions About Human Nature
17(3)
How Deterrence Works
20(6)
Summary
26(1)
Key Terms
26(1)
Discussion Questions
26(1)
References
27(2)
Biological Theories of Crime
29(24)
The Positivist School of Thought
31(1)
Physiognomy and Phrenology
31(1)
Lombroso and Atavism
32(3)
Genetic Theories
35(5)
Body Type Theories
40(2)
Recent Biological Theories
42(4)
Conclusion
46(2)
Summary
48(1)
Key Terms
49(1)
Discussion Questions
49(1)
References
50(3)
Psychological Theories of Crime
53(18)
Psychoanalytic Theory
54(3)
Personality Theories
57(3)
Mental Illness
60(4)
Schizophrenia
60(1)
Antisocial Personality
61(3)
Mental Deficiencies
64(3)
Conclusion
67(1)
Summary
68(1)
Key Terms
68(1)
Discussion Questions
69(1)
References
69(2)
The Social Ecology of Crime
71(20)
Social Disorganization Theory
72(9)
The Location of Crime
74(2)
Social Disorganization and Its Causes
76(2)
Empirical Support and Policy Implications
78(2)
Criticisms of Social Disorganization Theory
80(1)
Routine Activities Theory
81(6)
The Necessary Requirements for Crime
81(4)
The Role of Social Changes
85(1)
Policy Implications
86(1)
Empirical Research and Criticisms
87(1)
Summary
87(1)
Key Terms
88(1)
Discussion Questions
89(1)
References
89(2)
Learning and Cultural Transmission Theories of Crime
91(22)
Learning Theories
91(1)
Sutherland's Differential Association Theory
92(3)
Akers's Social Learning Theory
95(2)
Cultural Transmission Theories
97(12)
The Rise of the Subcultural Perspective
98(1)
Cultural Norms and Legal Process
99(1)
Cohen's Middle-Class Measuring Rod
100(2)
Cloward and Ohlin's Gang Typology
102(1)
Miller's Focal Concerns
103(2)
The Demise of the Subcultural Perspective
105(1)
Subcultures of Violence and the Rerise of the Cultural Perspective
106(3)
Summary
109(1)
Key Terms
109(1)
Discussion Questions
110(1)
References
110(3)
Strain Theories of Crime
113(18)
What Do Strain Theories Assume?
113(1)
Merton's Strain Theory and Its Variants
114(7)
The American Dream
114(2)
The American Social Structure
116(1)
Responses to Strain
117(1)
Later Work on Merton's Theory
118(2)
Empirical Support
120(1)
Agnew's General Strain Theory
121(4)
Types of Strain
122(1)
Types of Coping
123(1)
When Does Strain Lead to Delinquent Coping?
124(1)
Empirical Support
125(1)
Messner and Rosenfeld's Theory of Institutional Anomie
125(3)
Summary
128(1)
Key Terms
128(1)
Discussion Questions
129(1)
References
129(2)
Control Theories of Crime
131(18)
What Do Control Theories Assume About Human Nature?
131(2)
Early Control Theories
133(2)
Hirschi's Social Control Theory
135(4)
Attachment
136(1)
Commitment
136(1)
Involvement
137(1)
Belief
137(1)
Empirical Testing
138(1)
Self-Control Theory
139(5)
Empirical Research and Criticisms of Self-Control Theory
143(1)
Policy Implications of Control Theory
144(1)
Summary
145(1)
Key Terms
146(1)
Discussion Questions
146(1)
References
147(2)
Theories of Social Conflict
149(20)
The Conflict Perspective and Crime
180
The Marxist Heritage
151(2)
Marxist Concepts
151(1)
Orthodox Marxism
152(1)
Structural Marxism
152(1)
Labeling Theory
153(3)
Marxist Criminology
156(1)
White-Collar and State Crime
157(1)
Left Realism
158(1)
Cultural Criminology
159(1)
The Social Construction of Crime, Postmodernism, and Constitutive Criminology
159(2)
Feminist Criminology
161(3)
Peacemaking Criminology and Restorative Justice
164(1)
Summary
164(1)
Key Terms
165(1)
Discussion Questions
166(1)
References
166(3)
Evaluating and Integrating Theory
169(14)
Evaluating Theory
170(1)
Theory Competition
171(4)
Theoretical Elaboration
175(2)
Theoretical Integration
177(2)
Summary
179(1)
Key Terms
180(1)
Discussion Questions
180(1)
References
181(2)
Index 183


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