CART

(0) items

Criminology: A Sociological Understanding,9780133416039
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Criminology: A Sociological Understanding

by
ISBN13:

9780133416039

ISBN10:
0133416038
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
9/1/1996
Publisher(s):
Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
List Price: $77.33

Buy New Textbook

Usually Ships in 3-5 Business Days
N9780133416039
$75.40

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 9/1/1996.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Related Products


  • Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
    Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
  • Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
    Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
  • Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
    Criminology : A Sociological Understanding
  • Criminology A Sociological Understanding
    Criminology A Sociological Understanding
  • Criminology A Sociological Understanding Plus MyCrimeKit -- Access Card Package
    Criminology A Sociological Understanding Plus MyCrimeKit -- Access Card Package




Summary

In presenting a sociological perspective on crime and criminal justice, this book highlights issues of race, gender, and class throughout and emphasizes the criminogenic effects of the social and physical features of urban neighborhoods. Several chapters uncommon in other books are included.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii(3)
About the Author xvi
PART I UNDERSTANDING CRIME AND VICTIMIZATION 1(113)
CHAPTER 1 CRIMINOLOGY AND THE SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
1(20)
The Sociological Perspective
4(3)
The Mutual Relevance of Sociology and Criminology
6(1)
The Rise of Sociological Criminology
7(2)
Consensus and Conflict in the Creation of Criminal Law
9(1)
Research Methodology in Criminology
10(5)
Types of Research
11(3)
Criteria for Causality
14(1)
An Overview of Criminal Law
15(4)
Legal Distinctions in Types of Crimes
16(1)
Criminal Intent
16(1)
Legal Defenses to Criminal Liability
17(2)
Summary and Conclusion
19(1)
Key Terms
20(1)
CHAPTER 2 PUBLIC OPINION, THE NEWS MEDIA, AND THE CRIME PROBLEM
21(30)
Public Opinion and Public Policy
23(2)
The Accuracy of Public Beliefs About Crime and Criminal Justice
25(11)
The News Media and Public Opinion on Crime
26(2)
Overdramatization of Crime in the News Media
28(1)
A Brief Look Back
29(2)
Crime Myths
31(3)
MEDIA COVERAGE OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
34
The Effects of Media Coverage
33(3)
Research on Public Attitudes About Crime and Punishment
36(12)
Fear of Crime
36(7)
PERCEPTIONS OF CRIME AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN CANADA
43(1)
The Seriousness of Crime
44(2)
Attitudes Toward the Punishment of Criminals
46(2)
Summary and Conclusion
48(2)
Key Terms
50(1)
CHAPTER 3 THE MEASUREMENT AND PATTERNING OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
51(33)
Measuring Crime
53(11)
The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR)
53(5)
The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
58(4)
Self-Report Studies
62(2)
Evaluating UCR, NCVS, and Self-Report Data
64(1)
Recent Trends in U.S. Crime Rates
64(2)
The Patterning of Criminal Behavior
66(3)
Geographical Patterns
66(1)
MEASURING CRIME IN OTHER NATIONS
67(1)
Seasonal and Climatological Variations
68(1)
Social Patterns of Criminal Behavior
69(11)
Gender and Crime
69(4)
Race and Crime
73(3)
Class and Crime
76(2)
Age and Crime
78(2)
Chronic Offenders and Criminal Careers
80(2)
CRIMINAL POTENTIAL AND LIFE EVENTS AFTER CHILDHOOD
81(1)
Summary and Conclusion
82(1)
Key Terms
83(1)
CHAPTER 4 VICTIMS AND VICTIMIZATION
84(30)
Defining Victims and Studying Victimization
86(2)
The Patterning of Victimization
88(12)
Geographical Patterns
88(1)
Social Patterns
89(1)
CROSS-NATIONAL VICTIMIZATION PATTERNS
90(5)
The Victim-Offender Relationship
95(2)
Crime Characteristics
97(2)
Rape and Family Violence
99(1)
Explaining Victimization
100(6)
Lifestyle and Routine Activities Theory
101(2)
Deviant Lifestyles and Victimization
103(1)
Physical Proximity and Victimization
104(1)
Explaining Demographic Variation in Victimization
104(1)
The Issue of Victim Precipitation
104(2)
The Costs and Consequences of Victimization
106(2)
Economic and Medical Costs and Consequences
106(1)
Psychological Consequences
107(1)
Victims in the Criminal Justice System
108(2)
Victimization by White-Collar Crime
110(1)
Victimization Against the Homeless
110(2)
THE POLITICS OF VICTIMIZATION
111(1)
Summary and Conclusion
112(1)
Key Terms
113(1)
PART II EXPLAINING CRIME 114(137)
CHAPTER 5 EXPLAINING CRIME: EMPHASIS ON THE INDIVIDUAL
114(38)
From Theology to Science
118(5)
Gods and Demons as Causes of Crime and Deviance
118(1)
The Age of Reason
118(1)
The Classical School of Criminology
119(3)
The Rise of Positivism
122(1)
Biological Explanations
123(16)
Phrenology
123(1)
Cesare Lombroso
Atavism
124(2)
Earnest Hooton
Biological Inferiority
126(1)
William Sheldon
Body Shapes
127(1)
Family, Heredity, and Genes
128(3)
Neurochemical Mechanisms
131(3)
Diet and Nutrition
134(1)
Pregnancy and Birth Complications
135(1)
Critique of Biological Explanations
135(1)
RACE AND BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH
136(3)
Psychological Explanations
139(11)
Psychoanalytic Explanations
139(2)
Moral Development and Crime
141(1)
Intelligence and Crime
142(2)
Personality and Crime
144(2)
PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN NEW ZEALAND
146(1)
Critique of Psychological Explanations
147(3)
Summary and Conclusion
150(1)
Key Terms
151(1)
CHAPTER 6 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES: EMPHASIS ON SOCIAL STRUCTURE
152(32)
The Legacy of Durkheim
155(1)
Social Disorganization and Social Ecology
156(11)
Clifford R. Shaw and Henry D. McKay
158(1)
Critique of Social Disorganization Theory
159(1)
The Revival of Social Disorganization Theory
160(1)
Other Ecological Work
160(2)
CRIME RATES RISE AS NORMS BREAK DOWN
162(5)
Anomie/Strain Theory
167(7)
Critique of Anomie Theory
169(1)
Defense and Extension of Anomie Theory
170(2)
General Strain Theory
172(1)
CRIME IN FAMILIES: SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT OR BIOLOGICAL PROBLEM?
173(1)
Subcultural Theories
174(6)
Albert K. Cohen
School Failure and Delinquent Subcultures
174(2)
Walter B. Miller
Focal Concerns
176(2)
Marvin Wolfgang
Franco Ferracuti
The Subculture of Violence
178(1)
Richard Cloward
Lloyd Ohlin
Differential Opportunity Theory
179(1)
Structural Theories and Gender
180(1)
Summary and Conclusion
181(2)
Key Terms
183(1)
CHAPTER 7 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES: EMPHASIS ON SOCIAL PROCESS
184(33)
Learning Theories
186(8)
Edwin H. Sutherland
Differential Association Theory
187(3)
DELINQUENT PEERS AND DELINQUENCY: THE CAUSAL ORDER DEBATE
190(2)
Other Learning Theories
192(2)
Control Theories
194(19)
Walter Reckless
Containment Theory
195(1)
Gresham M. Sykes
David Matza
Neutralization and Drift Theory
196(3)
Travis Hirschi
Social Control Theory
199(3)
SOCIAL BONDING AND CRIME IN JAPAN
202(9)
Michael Gottfredson
Travis Hirschi
Self-Control Theory
211(2)
Integrating Social Process and Structural Explanations
213(2)
Summary and Conclusion
215(1)
Key Terms
216(1)
CHAPTER 8 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES
217(34)
Labeling Theory
219(10)
The Relativist Definition of Crime and Deviance
219(1)
The Imposition of the Deviant Label
220(2)
The Negative Consequences of Labeling
222(3)
Critique of Labeling Theory
225(1)
Revising and Renewing Labeling Theory
226(1)
HOW SHOULD WE DEAL WITH JUVENILE OFFENDERS?
227(2)
Conflict and Radical Theories
229(13)
Consensus and Conflict Perspectives in Sociology
229(1)
Conflict Perspectives in Criminology
230(2)
Radical Theories in Criminology
232(2)
CRIME AND THE ECONOMY IN CHINA AND VIETNAM
234(8)
Feminist Theories
242(7)
Feminist Perspectives in Criminology
243(1)
The Scope of Feminist Theory and Research
244(2)
Developments in Feminist Criminology
246(2)
A Final Word on Feminism
248(1)
Summary and Conclusion
249(1)
Key Terms
250(1)
PART III CRIMINAL BEHAVIORS 251(207)
CHAPTER 9 VIOLENT CRIME: HOMICIDE, ASSAULT, AND ROBBERY
251(34)
Homicide and Assault
253(18)
Defining Homicide and Assault
253(1)
The Patterning and Social Dynamics of Homicide
254(4)
Trends in U.S. Homicide Rates
258(2)
Explaining Homicide and Assault
260(2)
WHY IS CANADA LESS VIOLENT THAN THE UNITED STATES?
262(7)
Mass Media and Violence
269(2)
Robbery
271(5)
Defining Robbery
271(1)
USING VIOLENCE TO STOP VIOLENCE
272(1)
The Extent, Patterning, and Costs of Robbery
272(3)
Types of Robbers
275(1)
Explaining Robbery
275(1)
Handguns and Gun Control
276(5)
The Extent and Distribution of Handguns
277(1)
The Use of Handguns in Violent Crime
277(1)
Do Handguns Deter or Promote Violent Crime?
278(1)
The Effectiveness of Gun Control
279(1)
The Effectiveness of Tougher Penalties for Handgun Crimes
280(1)
Reducing Violent Crime
281(3)
What History Tells Us
282(2)
Summary and Conclusion
284(1)
Key Terms
284(1)
CHAPTER 10 VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN
285(30)
Violence Against Women
287(20)
An International Problem
288(1)
Defining Rape and Battering
288(1)
DOWRY DEATHS IN INDIA AND PAKISTAN
289(1)
The Extent of Rape and Battering
290(2)
The Social Patterning of Rape and Battering
292(4)
Explaining Rape and Battering
296(5)
The Issue of Husband Battering
301(1)
Reducing Violence Against Women
302(2)
IS A WOMAN'S SEXUAL PAST RELEVANT IN A RAPE CASE?
304(3)
Violence Against Children: Physical and Sexual Abuse
307(6)
Defining Child Physical and Sexual Abuse
308(1)
The Extent of Physical and Sexual Abuse
308(3)
The Patterning of Physical and Sexual Abuse
311(1)
Explaining Child Abuse
311(2)
Reducing Child Abuse
313(1)
Summary and Conclusion
313(1)
Key Terms
314(1)
CHAPTER 11 PROPERTY CRIME
315(28)
Defining Property Crimes
317(1)
The Extent of Property Crime
318(1)
The Patterning of Property Crime
319(3)
The Social Organization of Property Crime
322(4)
Burglary
323(3)
PROPERTY CRIME IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND
326(1)
Property Crime Victimization: Costs and Circumstances
326(3)
Forgery and Fraud
329(3)
Check Forgery and Credit Card Fraud
329(1)
Coupon Fraud
330(1)
Welfare and Tax Fraud
330(1)
Insurance Fraud
331(1)
Explaining Property Crime
332(6)
Cultural Emphasis on Economic Success
332(1)
Techniques of Neutralization
333(1)
Economic Deprivation and Unemployment
334(1)
Routine Activities and Social Process Factors
335(1)
Property Crime for Thrills
335(1)
A Look at Shoplifting and Arson
336(2)
Reducing Property Crime
338(3)
TARGET HARDENING: IS INCREASED SECURITY WORTH THE PRICE?
340(1)
Summary and Conclusion
341(1)
Key Terms
342(1)
CHAPTER 12 WHITE-COLLAR CRIME
343(36)
Defining White-Collar Crime
345(4)
Edwin Sutherland and White-Collar Crime
346(1)
Conceptual Problems in Defining White-Collar Crime
347(1)
Contemporary Views
348(1)
Occupational Crime: Lawbreaking for Personal Gain
349(8)
Employee Theft: Pilferage and Embezzling
349(2)
Collective Embezzlement in the Savings and Loan Industry
351(1)
Fraud in the Professions
352(1)
Health-Care Fraud
353(3)
Financial Fraud
356(1)
Police and Political Corruption: Violations of Public Trust
357(1)
Organizational Criminality and Corporate Crime
357(14)
Corporate Financial Crime
359(3)
Corporate Violence: Threats to Health and Safety
362(1)
DID TOBACCO COMPANIES LIE TO CONSUMERS?
363(5)
PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY "DUMPING" IN THE THIRD WORLD
368(3)
The Economic and Human Costs of White-Collar Crime
371(1)
Explaining White-Collar Crime
372(4)
Reducing White-Collar Crime
376(1)
Summary and Conclusion
376(2)
Key Terms
378(1)
CHAPTER 13 POLITICAL CRIME
379(39)
Defining Political Crime
381(2)
Crime by Government
383(15)
Political Repression and Human Rights Violations
383(3)
HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN NIGERIA
386(8)
Unethical or Illegal Experimentation
394(1)
State-Corporate Crime
395(1)
Political Corruption
396(1)
DO RACE AND ETHNICITY AFFECT WHICH POLITICIANS ARE PROSECUTED FOR ETHICAL VIOLATIONS?
397(1)
Hate Crime
398(3)
Crime Against Government
401(13)
Mass Political Violence: Rebellion, Riots, Terrorism
402(6)
Civil Disobedience
408(5)
Espionage and Treason
413(1)
Explaining and Reducing Political Crime
414(2)
The Social Patterning of Political Crime
414(2)
Reducing Political Crime
416(1)
Summary and Conclusion
416(1)
Key Terms
417(1)
CHAPTER 14 PUBLIC ORDER AND ORGANIZED CRIME
418(40)
Overview of the Public Order Crime Debate
420(1)
Illegal Drug Use
421(18)
Drug Use in History
422(1)
Contemporary U.S. Drug Use
423(4)
Explaining Illegal Drug Use
427(3)
The Drugs-Crime Connection
430(3)
The Legalization Debate
433(6)
Sexual Offenses: Prostitution and Pornography
439(9)
Prostitution
439(3)
Pornography
442(2)
SHOULD PROSTITUTION BE LEGALIZED?
444(4)
Gambling
448(2)
Organized Crime
450(5)
History of Organized Crime
450(3)
The Alien Conspiracy Model and Myth
453(1)
THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF PUBLIC ORDER AND ORGANIZED CRIME
454(1)
Reducing Public Order and Organized Crime
455(2)
Summary and Conclusion
457(1)
Key Terms
457(1)
PART IV CONTROLLING AND PREVENTING CRIME 458(89)
CHAPTER 15 POLICING: DILEMMAS OF CRIME CONTROL IN DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY
458(37)
Crime Control in a Democratic Society
460(2)
The Ideal of Blind Justice
462(1)
A Preview of the Discussion
462(1)
The Development of the Modern Police Force
463(2)
Working Personality and Police Behavior
465(8)
Police Misconduct: Brutality
467(5)
Police Misconduct: Corruption
472(1)
Police Discretion: To Arrest or Not to Arrest?
473(9)
POLICE AND POLICING IN JAPAN
474(1)
Race, Ethnicity, and Arrest
475(5)
Gender and Arrest
480(2)
The Impact of Policing on Crime
482(9)
Do Additional Police Deter Crime?
483(1)
Does Arrest Make a Difference?
484(2)
THE 1990S DROP IN URBAN CRIME: A RESULT OF "ZERO-TOLERANCE" POLICING?
486(3)
Community Policing: Real Promise or False Hope?
489(1)
Legal Technicalities and Police Effectiveness
489(1)
The Impact of Policing on Crime Revisited
490(1)
Women and People of Color in Police Forces
491(2)
Summary and Conclusion
493(1)
Key Terms
494(1)
CHAPTER 16 PROSECUTION AND PUNISHMENT
495(36)
Criminal Courts and the Adversary System
497(4)
Prosecutors, the Courtroom Work Group, and Plea Bargaining
499(2)
Punishment, Social Structure, and Inequality
501(18)
Social Class and Legal Outcomes
503(2)
The Impact of Race and Ethnicity
505(5)
PUNISHING CRIMINALS IN DENMARK AND THE NETHERLANDS
510(7)
Gender and Sentencing
517(2)
The Impact of Punishment on Crime
519(4)
"THREE STRIKES AND YOU'RE OUT" LEGISLATION
520(2)
The Evidence Against a Deterrent Effect
522(1)
The Death Penalty Debate
523(6)
The Cost of the Death Penalty versus the Cost of Life Sentences
525(1)
General Deterrence and the Death Penalty
525(1)
Arbitrariness and Racial Discrimination in the Death Penalty's Application
526(2)
The Quality of Legal Representation of Capital Defendants
528(1)
Wrongful Executions
529(1)
Summary and Conclusion
529(1)
Key Terms
530(1)
CHAPTER 17 CONCLUSION: HOW CAN WE REDUCE CRIME?
531(16)
The Criminal Justice System "Funnel"
533(3)
A Sociological Prescription for Crime Reduction
536(10)
A. Social, Cultural, and Community Crime Prevention (Primary Prevention)
537(3)
B. Developmental Crime Prevention (Secondary Prevention)
540(1)
C. Criminal Justice Approaches (Tertiary Prevention)
541(5)
Summary and Conclusion
546(1)
Key Terms
546(1)
Glossary 547(9)
References 556(48)
Photo Acknowledgments 604(1)
Name Index 605(10)
Subject Index 615


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...