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Criminology Today : An Integrative Introduction - Update

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131777101

ISBN10:
0131777106
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For sophomore/junior level courses in Introduction to Criminology or Criminology courses in Sociology, Criminal Justice and Political Science departments. The American crime picture has changed, and Criminology Today 3e UPDATE has changed with it, including the most up to date coverage available of terrorism, white-collar crime and other issues of major concern to criminologists at the start of the 21st century. Interesting, timely, and relevant, Criminology Today 3e UPDATE helps students draw their own conclusions about the American crime problem, prepare for the future, and learn to make informed decisions about public policy in the crime-control area.

Table of Contents

FOREWORD xxi
A NOTE ABOUT THIS SPECIAL UPDATE xxiii
PREFACE xxv
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xxvii
ABOUT THE AUTHOR xxix
INSTRUCTIONS TO STUDENTS USING CRIMINOLOGY TODAY'S WORLD WIDE WEB FEATURES xxx
PART I THE CRIME PICTURE
CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS CRIMINOLOGY?
3(30)
Introduction
4(1)
What Is Crime?
5(4)
Theory versus Reality: Should Doctor-Assisted Suicide Remain Illegal?
8(1)
Crime and Deviance
9(1)
What Should Be Criminal?
10(1)
What Do Criminologists Do?
11(1)
What Is Criminology?
12(5)
Theoretical Criminology
15(1)
Theory versus Reality: Varying Perspectives on Crime and Criminology
16(1)
Criminology and Social Policy
17(2)
Social Policy and Public Crime Concerns
18(1)
The Theme of This Book
19(1)
The Social Context of Crime
20(7)
Theory versus Reality: A Public Health Model of Crime Control
21(1)
Making Sense of Crime: The Causes and Consequences of the Criminal Event
22(2)
Theory versus Reality: The Murder of John Lennon
24(3)
The Primacy of Sociology?
27(1)
Summary
28(1)
Discussion Questions
28(1)
Web Quest!
28(1)
Library Extras!
29(1)
Notes
29(4)
CHAPTER 2 PATTERNS DF CRIME
33(48)
Introduction
34(1)
A History of Crime Statistics
35(3)
Adolphe Quetelet and André Michel Guerry
35(3)
Crime Statistics Today
38(9)
Programmatic Problems with Available Data
37(1)
The UCR Program
37(2)
NIBRS: The New UCR
39(1)
Crime in the News: Crime Hits 20-Year Low, FBI Says
40(2)
Hate Crimes
42(3)
Data Gathering under the NCVS
45(2)
Patterns of Change
47(3)
Crime in the News: Crowded Prisons, Plummeting Crime Rates
48(2)
The Crime Problem
50(1)
Major Crimes
51(29)
Criminal Homicide
51(2)
Theory versus Reality: Serial Killer John Wayne Gacy's Execution
53(1)
Forcible Rape
54(2)
Robbery
56(1)
Aggravated Assault
57(1)
Burglary
57(1)
Larceny
58(1)
Motor Vehicle Theft
59(1)
Arson
59(21)
Part II Offenses
80
Other Sources of Data
61(1)
Unreported Crime
61(2)
The Social Dimensions of Crime
63(10)
What Are "Social Dimensions"?
63(1)
Age and Crime
64(2)
Gender and Crime
66(2)
Theory versus Reality: Adolescent Motherhood and Crime
68(1)
Race and Crime
68(3)
Crime in the News: Violence Hits Blacks Hardest
71(1)
Social Class and Crime
72(1)
The Costs of Crime
73(1)
Summary
74(1)
Discussion Questions
74(1)
Web Quest!
74(1)
Library Extras!
74(2)
Notes
76(5)
CHAPTER 3 RESEARCH METHODS AND THEORY DEVELOPMENT
81(28)
Introduction
82(1)
The Science of Criminology
83(1)
Theory Building
83(2)
The Role of Research
85(10)
Crime in the News: Geo-Profiling: Potent New Police Technique
86(1)
Problem Identification
87(1)
Research Designs
88(3)
Techniques of Data Collection
91(3)
Data Analysis
94(1)
Quantitative versus Qualitative Methods
95(2)
Values and Ethics in the Conduct of Research
97(2)
Social Policy and Criminological Research
99(1)
Theory versus Reality: The American Society of Criminology Task Force Reports
100(1)
Writing the Research Report
100(3)
Writing for Publication
102(1)
Summary
103(1)
Discussion Questions
103(1)
Web Quest!
104(1)
Library Extras!
104(1)
Notes
104(5)
PART II CRIME CAUSATION
CHAPTER 4 CLASSICAL A NEOCLASSICAL THOUGHT
109(30)
Introduction
110(1)
Major Principles of the Classical School
111(1)
Forerunners of Classical Thought
111(5)
The Demonic Era
112(1)
Early Sources of the Criminal Law
112(2)
The Enlightenment
114(2)
The Classical School
116(3)
Cesare Beccaria (1738-1794)
116(1)
Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832)
117(2)
Heritage of the Classical School
119(1)
Neoclassical Criminology
119(5)
Rational Choice Theory
120(1)
The Seductions of Crime
121(1)
Situational Crime Control Policy
122(1)
Critique of Rational Choice Theory
123(1)
Theory in Perspective: The Classical School and Neoclassical Thinkers
124(1)
Punishment and Neoclassical Thought
124(5)
Just Deserts
125(1)
Deterrence
125(1)
The Death Penalty
126(3)
Policy Implications of the Classical School
129(2)
Law and Order versus Individual Rights
129(1)
Crime in the News: Death Row Fashion Ads Spark Outrage
130(1)
A Critique of Classical Theories
131(1)
Theory versus Reality: Assessing Dangerousness
132(1)
Summary
132(1)
Discussion Questions
133(1)
Web Quest!
134(1)
Library Extras!
134(1)
Notes
134(5)
CHAPTER 5 BIOLOGICAL ROOTS OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
139(32)
Introduction
140(2)
Major Principles of Biological Theories
142(1)
Biological Roots of Human Aggression
142(12)
Early Biological Theories
143(1)
Theory in Perspective: Types of Biological Theories
144(2)
Theory versus Reality: Positivism: The Historical Statement
146(2)
Body Types
148(1)
Chemical and Environmental Precursors of Crime
149(3)
Hormones and Criminality
152(2)
Weather and Crime
154(1)
Genetics and Crime
154(8)
Criminal Families
154(1)
The XYY "Supermale"
155(1)
Chromosomes and Modern-Day Criminal Families
156(1)
Behavioral Genetics
156(1)
Crime in the News: "Delinquency Genes" Identified?
157(1)
The Human Genome Project
157(2)
Male-Female Differences in Criminality
159(1)
Sociobiology
160(2)
Crime and Human Nature: A Contemporary Synthesis
162(1)
Policy Issues
163(1)
Critiques of Biological Theories
164(1)
Summary
164(1)
Discussion Questions
165(1)
Web Quest!
165(1)
Library Extras!
165(1)
Notes
165(6)
CHAPTER 6 PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHIATRIC FOUNDATIONS OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
171(32)
Introduction
172(2)
Theory versus Reality: What Is Forensic Psychology?
174(1)
Major Principles of Psychological Theories
174(1)
Early Psychological Theories
175(4)
The Psychopath
175(1)
Antisocial Personality Disorder
176(1)
Personality Types and Crime
177(1)
Theory in Perspective: Types of Psychological and Psychiatric Theories
178(1)
Early Psychiatric Theories
179(1)
Criminal Behavior as Maladaptation
179(5)
The Psychoanalytic Perspective
179(2)
The Psychotic Offender
181(1)
The Link between Frustration and Aggression
182(1)
Crime in the News: Children's Brutal Deaths Stun S.C. Town
183(1)
Crime as Adaptive Behavior
184(1)
Modeling Theory
185(2)
Behavior Theory
187(1)
Attachment Theory
188(1)
Self-Control Theory
188(1)
Insanity and the Law
189(4)
The M'Naughten Rule
190(1)
The Irresistible-Impulse Test
191(1)
The Durham Rule
191(1)
The Substantial-Capacity Test
191(1)
The Brawner Rule
192(1)
Guilty but Mentally Ill
192(1)
Federal Provisions for the Hospitalization of Individuals Found "NGRI"
192(1)
Social Policy and Forensic Psychology
193(2)
Social Policy and the Psychology of Criminal Conduct
194(1)
Criminal Psychological Profiling
195(2)
Crime in the News: FBI School Risk Assessment Guide Sparks Controversy
196(1)
Summary
197(1)
Discussion Questions
197(1)
Web Quest!
198(1)
Library Extras!
198(1)
Notes
198(5)
CHAPTER 7 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES I: SOCIAL STRUCTURE
203(26)
Introduction
204(1)
Major Principles of Sociological Theories
205(3)
Social Structure Theories Defined
208
Types of Social Structure Theories
206(16)
Social Disorganization Theory
206(1)
Theory in Perspective: Types of Social Structure Theories
207(3)
Strain Theory
210(1)
Theory versus Reality: The Criminology of Place, Routine Activities, and Crime Mapping
211(3)
Culture Conflict Theory
214(6)
Crime in the News: D.C. Gang Blamed for 31 Killings
220(2)
Policy Implications of Social Structure Theories
222(1)
Critique of Social Structure Theories
222(2)
Summary
224(1)
Discussion Questions
224(1)
Web Quest!
225(1)
Library Extras!
225(1)
Notes
225(4)
CHAPTER 8 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES II: SOCIAL PROCESS AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
229(32)
Introduction
230(1)
The Social Process Perspective
231(1)
Types of Social Process Approaches
231(11)
Theory in Perspective: Types of Social Process Theories
232(1)
Learning Theory
232(2)
Crime in the News: Kids Likely to Follow Parents to Prison
234(1)
Social Control Theory
235(3)
Labeling Theory
238(2)
Reintegrative Shaming
240(1)
Dramaturgy
241(1)
Policy Implications of Social Process Theories
242(2)
Critique of Social Process Theories
244(1)
The Social Development Perspective
244(1)
Concepts in Social Development Theories
245(9)
The Life Course Perspective
245(1)
Theory in Perspective: Social Development Theories
246(1)
Laub and Sampson's Age-Graded Theory
247(1)
Moffitt's Dual Taxonomic Theory
248(1)
Farrington's Delinquent Development Theory
248(1)
Evolutionary Ecology
249(1)
Theory versus Reality: Social Influences on Developmental Pathways
250(1)
Developmental Pathways
251(2)
The Chicago Human Development Project
253(1)
Policy Implications of Social Development Theories
254(1)
Critique of Social Development Theories
254(1)
Summary
255(1)
Discussion Questions
255(1)
Web Quest!
255(1)
Library Extras!
256(1)
Notes
256(5)
CHAPTER 9 SOCIALOGICAL THEORIES III: SOCIAL CONFLICT
261(28)
Introduction
262(2)
Theory versus Reality: The Unabomber and Domestic Terrorism
263(1)
Law and Social Order Perspectives
264(2)
The Consensus Perspective
264(1)
The Pluralist Perspective
265(1)
The Conflict Perspective
266(1)
Radical-Critical Criminology
266(7)
Theory in Perspective: Social Conflict Theories
267(1)
Early Radical Criminology
267(4)
Radical Criminology Today 269 Critical Criminology
271(1)
Radical-Critical Criminology and Policy Issues
272(1)
Critique of Radical-Critical Criminology
272(1)
Emerging Conflict Theories
273(9)
Left-Realist Criminology
273(1)
Feminist Criminology
274(3)
Crime in the News: Women Cops Less Prone to Violence, Report Says
277(1)
Postmodern Criminology
278(1)
Peacemaking Criminology
279(3)
Policy Implications
282
Summary
262(20)
Discussion Questions
282(1)
Web Quest!
283(1)
Library Extras!
283(1)
Notes
283(6)
PART III CRIME IN THE MODERN WORLD
CHAPTER 10 CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS
289(50)
Introduction
290(1)
Violent Crime Typologies
291(1)
Homicide
292(7)
The Subculture of Violence Thesis and Structural Explanations
292(1)
The Victim-Offender Relationship
292(1)
Crime in the News: Most Female Violent Criminals Knew Their Victims
293(1)
Instrumental and Expressive Homicide
294(1)
Victim Precipitation
294(1)
Weapon Use
295(1)
Alcohol and Drug Use
296(1)
Gangs
296(1)
Serial Murder
297(2)
Mass Murder
299(1)
Rape
299(10)
Rape Myths
300(1)
The Common Law Definition of Rape
300(1)
Rape Law Reform
301(1)
Crime in the News: All Men Potential Rapists, Claim Authors
302(2)
The Social Context of Rape
304(1)
Theoretical Perspectives on Rape
305(3)
Typologies of Rapists
308(1)
Robbery
309(4)
The Lethal Potential of Robbery
310(1)
Criminal Careers of Robbers
310(1)
Robbery and Public Transportation
310(1)
The Motivation of Robbers
310(2)
Drug Robberies
312(1)
The Gendered Nature of Robbery
313(1)
Assault
313(4)
Stranger Assault
314(1)
Assault within Families
314(3)
Stalking
317(2)
The Extent of Stalking
317(1)
Victim-Offender Relationships in Stalking
317(1)
Stalking in Intimate-Partner Relationships
318(1)
Consequences of Stalking
318(1)
Cyberstalking
318(1)
Terrorism
319(9)
International Terrorism
320(1)
Domestic Terrorism
321(1)
Cyberterrorism
322(1)
Terrorism Commisions and Reports
323(1)
Countering the Terrorist Threat
324(1)
Theory versus Reality: Individual Rights versus Public Safety
325(2)
Crime in the News: Study: Hate Groups Merge, Get More Dangerous
327(1)
Summary
328(1)
Discussion Questions
328(1)
Web Quest!
329(1)
Library Extras!
329(1)
Notes
329(10)
CHAPTER 11 CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY
339(28)
Introduction
340(1)
Persistent and Professional Thieves
341(2)
Criminal Careers of Property Offenders
342(1)
Property Offenders and Rational Choice
342(1)
Larceny-Theft
343(7)
Prevalence and Profile of Larceny-Theft
343(1)
Theft on College Campuses
343(1)
Motor Vehicle Theft
344(2)
Shoplifting and Employee Theft
346(4)
Crime in the News: Boys, 7 and 10, Busted for Burglary
350(1)
Burglary
350(7)
The Social Ecology of Burglary
350(2)
Theory versus Reality: Ethnographic Research on Active Burglars
352(1)
Types of Burglars
353(1)
Burglary Locales
353(1)
The Motivation of Burglars
354(1)
Target Selection
355(1)
Costs of Burglary
356(1)
The Burglary-Drug Connection
356(1)
The Sexualized Context of Burglary
357(1)
Stolen Property
357(2)
The Role of Criminal Receivers
358(1)
Arson
359(1)
Fire Setters
359(1)
Summary
360(1)
Discussion Questions
360(1)
Web Quest!
361(1)
Library Extras!
361(1)
Notes
361(6)
CHAPTER 12 WHITE-COLLAR AND ORGANIZED CRIME
367(38)
Introduction
368(2)
White-Collar Crime
370(12)
Definitional Evolution of White-Collar Crime
375(1)
Theory versus Reality: White-Collar Crime: The Initial Statement
376(1)
Corporate Crime
377(2)
Causes of White-Collar Crime
379(1)
Curtailing White-Collar and Corporate Crime
380(2)
Organized Crime
382(16)
History of Organized Crime in the United States
383(1)
A Rose by Any Other Name-La Cosa Nostra
383(1)
Crime in the News: Are The Sopranos the Real Deal?
384(2)
Prohibition and Official Corruption
386(1)
The Centralization of Organized Crime
387(1)
La Cosa Nostra Today
388(1)
Activities of Organized Crime
389(1)
Code of Conduct
390(1)
Other Organized Criminal Groups
391(1)
Transnational Organized Crime
392(2)
Organized Crime and the Law
394(4)
Policy Issues: The Control of Organized Crime
398(1)
Summary
398(1)
Discussion Questions
399(1)
Web Quest!
399(1)
Library Extras!
399(1)
Notes
399(6)
CHAPTER 13 DRUG ABUGE AND CRIME
405(30)
Introduction
408
History of Drug Abuse in the United States
407(6)
Extent of Abuse
408(2)
Young People and Drugs
410(1)
Theory versus Reality: The Harvard Alcohol Study
411(1)
Costs of Abuse
412(1)
Types of Illegal Drugs
413(4)
Stimulants
413(2)
Depressants
415(1)
Cannabis
415(1)
Narcotics
416(1)
Hallucinogens
416(1)
Anabolic Steroids
416(1)
Inhalants
416(1)
Pharmaceutical Diversion and Designer Drugs
417(1)
Drug Trafficking
417(2)
Drugs and Crime
419(2)
Illegal Drugs and Official Corruption
420(1)
Social Policy and Drug Abuse
421(9)
Theory versus Reality: Drug Courts and Public Policy
423(1)
Recent Legislation
424(1)
Drug-Control Strategies
424(1)
The National Drug-Control Policy
425(1)
Crime in the News: Customs Chief Calls for New Drug Strategy
426(1)
Policy Consequences
427(1)
Alternative Drug Policies
428(2)
Summary
430(1)
Discussion Questions
430(1)
Web Quest!
430(1)
Library Extras!
431(1)
Notes
431(4)
CHAPTER 14 TECHNOLOGY AND CRIME
435(32)
Introduction
436(1)
The Advance of Technology
436(1)
High Technology and Criminal Opportunity
437(5)
Technology and Criminal Mischief
440(1)
Computer Crime and the Law
441(1)
A Profile of Computer Criminals
442(7)
Theory versus Reality: Wisconsin Defines Computer Crime
443(1)
Theory versus Reality: Colorado Defines Computer Crime
444(1)
The History and Nature of Hacking
445(1)
Theory versus Reality: The Computer Hacker: A Psychological and Social Profile
446(1)
Theory versus Reality: Technological Attraction
447(1)
Crime in the News: Identity Theft Thrives in Cyberspace
448(1)
Computer Crime as a Form of White-Collar Crime
449(1)
The Information Superhighway and Data Security
449(2)
Technology in the Fight against Crime
451(5)
DNA Fingerprinting
452(2)
Crime in the News: National DNA Database Solves Its First Crime
454(1)
Computers as Crime-Fighting Tools
455(1)
Combating Computer Crime
456(2)
Police Investigation of Computer Crime
457(1)
Dealing with Computer Criminals
458(1)
Policy Issues: Personal Freedoms in the Information Age
458(1)
Theory versus Reality: Press Release Announcing the Formation of the Electronic Frontier Foundation
459(1)
What the Future Holds
459(1)
Summary
460(1)
Discussion Questions
461(1)
Web Quest!
461(1)
Library Extras!
461(1)
Notes
462(5)
PART IV RESPONDING TO CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
CHAPTER 15 CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIAL POLICY
467(30)
Introduction
468(1)
Federal Anticrime Initiatives
469(12)
The Hoover Administration
470(1)
Federal Policy following World War II
471(1)
The Reagan and Bush Years
472(1)
Clinton Administration Initiatives
472(3)
Theory versus Reality. Gun Control
475(4)
The Administration of George W. Bush
479(1)
Crime in the News: Should We Arm the Teachers?
480(1)
Crime Control Philosophies Today
481(4)
Types of Crime Control Strategies
482(1)
Theory versus Reality: Youth Violence and Social Policy
483(1)
International Policies
484(1)
Criminology and Social Policy
485(1)
The Victims' Movement
485(4)
A History of the Victim
485(1)
Current Directions in Victims' Rights
486(1)
Theory versus Reality: A Proposed Victims' Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
487(1)
Victim-Impact Statements
488(1)
Victim Restitution
488(1)
Can We Solve the Problem of Crime?
489(2)
Symbolism and Public Policy
490(1)
Summary
491(1)
Discussion Questions
491(1)
Web Quest!
492(1)
Library Extras!
492(1)
Notes
492(5)
CHAPTER 16 FUTURE DIRECTIONS
497(16)
Introduction
498(6)
Globalization
500(1)
Techniques of Futures Research
500(1)
Crime in the News: Technology Changing Organized Crime
501(2)
Theory versus Reality. Crime and Justice Policy Challenges of the Near Future
503(1)
Future Crimes
504(1)
The New Criminologies
505(2)
Theory Integration
506(1)
Policies of the Future
507(3)
Summary
510(1)
Discussion Questions
510(1)
Web Quest!
511(1)
Library Extras!
511(1)
Notes
511(2)
GLOSSARY 513(14)
SUBJECT INDEX 527(16)
NAME INDEX 543

Excerpts

The field of criminology is far deeper, and much broader intellectually, than the 600-or-so pages of information that any printed textbook can fit between its covers. Moreover, the field is changing daily, as new theories of causation are proposed; as novel forms of crime take their place alongside traditional ones; and as policymakers strive to embrace ever more effective crime-control techniques in legislative debates, social programs, and innovative media campaigns. Echoing these sentiments, it's been said that an introductory textbook like this one must be a mile long, but it can only be an inch thick. In other words, any introduction to criminology must cover the history of the field and the important theorists and theories of the past and present. It must also provide a solid overview of the crime picture in contemporary society, and it must offer some insight into the crime control policies of yesterday and today. Most such books are also expected to include a description of different types of crime, along with an explanation of the complex social and individual nexus that leads to crime. As an author of a number of books in the field of crime and justice, I can attest to the fact that this is a tall order. Because of its physical limits, an introductory text cannot spend too much time describing any one perspective, theory, law, or offense. Thankfully, in writing the third edition ofCriminology TodayI no longer found myself bound by the traditional limits of print media. This new edition, for the first time, makes extensive use of educational technologies that were only in their infancy when the first edition of this book appeared. Even though the first edition was accompanied by a Web site (the first criminology text to have reached such a milestone, I am told), and the second edition built that site into a comprehensive and interactive learning tool, it is with this new edition that the true possibilities of the Internet have been fully embraced. Sprinkled throughout the pages of this book you will find icons pointing to new learning possibilities. Among them are Web Quests!,which challenge you to work your way through comprehensive Web-based chapter projects. Web Quests! make studying enjoyable and open the door to a wealth of electronic information. Web Extras!,which take you to sites that are closely related to the materials you are reading about. Web Extras! provide a "virtual criminology" tour of the Internet, with visits to sites too numerous to mention in this brief preface. Audio Extras!,which allow you to listen to the author introduce each chapter of your text. Library Extras!,which provide a list of readily accessible Web-based reading assignments that round out chapter materials. All are new to this edition, and each has been closely integrated with the text to provide a wealth of freely available materials that add substantial value to the learning experience. Web Quests!, Web Extras!, Audio Extras!, and Library Extras! finally allow me, as an author, to offer you a textbook that is far more than the proverbial "inch-thick" book would be. Other special features ofCriminology Todaymake this book substantially different from all the other available texts which deal with the same subject matter. The following list highlights what I see as the important differences: Criminology Todaymakes use of the latest available instructional technologies and offers students the opportunity to learn from the Internet, from videos, and from print media. Criminology Todayemphasizes the wide and interdisciplinary variety of academic perspectives that contribute to a thorough and well-informed understanding of the crime problem--hence the book's subtitle,An Integrative Introduction. Criminology Todayis up-to-date. It addresses the latest social issues an


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