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Criminology Today : An Integrative Introduction,9780138482688
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Criminology Today : An Integrative Introduction

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780138482688

ISBN10:
0138482683
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
6/1/1998
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $80.00
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Summary

This book is intended for Introduction to Criminology course taught at sophomore level out of both Criminal Justice and Sociology programs.

Table of Contents

Foreword xv
Preface xvii
Acknowledgments xxi
About the Author xxiii
PART I THE CRIME PICTURE 1(144)
What is Criminology?
3(42)
Introduction
4(2)
What is Crime?
6(3)
Crime and Deviance
9(6)
What do Criminologists Do?
15(1)
What is Criminology?
16(4)
Theoretical Criminology
19(1)
Criminology and Social Policy
20(5)
Social Policy and the Fear of Crime
21(4)
The Theme of this Book
25(5)
The Social Context of Crime
30(8)
Making Sense of Crime: The Causes and Consequences of the Criminal Event
30(8)
The Primacy of Sociology
38(1)
Summary
39(1)
Web Watch
40(1)
Discussion Questions
41(1)
Notes
41(4)
Patterns of Crime
45(60)
Introduction
47(1)
A History of Crime Statistics
47(2)
Adolphe Quetelet and Andre Michel Guerry
48(1)
Crime Statistics Today
49(33)
The UCR Program
50(5)
Data Gathering Under the NCVS
55(7)
Criminal Homicide
62(4)
Forcible Rape
66(3)
Robbery
69(2)
Aggravated Assault
71(1)
Burglary
72(4)
Larceny
76(1)
Motor Vehicle Theft
77(1)
Arson
78(2)
Part II Offenses
80(1)
Unreported Crimes
80(2)
The Social Dimensions of Crime
82(14)
What are ``Social Dimensions''?
82(1)
Age and Crime
83(4)
Gender and Crime
87(4)
Ethnicity and Crime
91(4)
Social Class and Crime
95(1)
The Costs of Crime
96(1)
Summary
97(1)
Discussion Questions
98(1)
Web Watch
99(1)
Notes
100(5)
Research Methods and Theory Development
105(40)
Introduction
106(1)
The Science of Criminology
107(3)
Theory Building
110(1)
The Role of Research
111(18)
Problem Identification
113(1)
Research Designs
114(4)
Techniques of Data Collection
118(8)
Quantitative vs. Qualitative Methods
126(3)
Values and Ethics in the Conduct of Research
129(2)
Writing the Research Report
131(7)
Writing for Publication
134(4)
Social Policy and Criminological Research
138(2)
Summary
140(1)
Web Watch
141(1)
Discussion Questions
142(1)
Notes
142(3)
PART II CRIME CAUSATION 145(212)
The Classical Thinkers
147(40)
Introduction
148(1)
Major Principles of the Classical School
149(1)
Forerunners of Classical Thought
150(8)
The Demonic Era
151(1)
Early Sources of the Criminal Law
152(2)
The Enlightenment
154(4)
The Classical School
158(5)
Cesare Beccaria (1738--1794)
158(2)
Jeremy Bentham (1748--1832)
160(2)
Heritage of the Classical School
162(1)
Neoclassical Criminology
163(13)
Free Will in Neoclassical Thought
166(1)
Punishment and Neoclassical Thought
167(9)
Policy Implications of the Classical School
176(4)
A Critique of Classical Theories
180(2)
Summary
182(1)
Web Watch
183(1)
Discussion Questions
183(1)
Notes
184(3)
Biological Roots of Behavior
187(40)
Introduction
189(1)
Major Principles of Biological Theories
190(1)
Biological Roots of Human Aggression
191(15)
Early Biological Theories
193(5)
Body Types
198(3)
Chemical and Environmental Precursors of Crime
201(2)
Hormones and Criminality
203(3)
Genetics and Crime
206(9)
Criminal Families
206(1)
The XYY ``Supermale''
207(1)
Chromosomes and Modern-Day Criminal Families
208(1)
Twin Studies
209(1)
Male-Female Differences in Criminality
209(4)
Sociobiology
213(2)
Crime and Human Nature: A Contemporary Synthesis
215(1)
Policy Issues
216(2)
Critiques of Biological Theories
218(1)
Summary
219(1)
Discussion Questions
219(1)
Web Watch
220(1)
Notes
220(7)
Psychological and Psychiatric Foundations of Criminal Behavior
227(42)
Introduction
229(2)
Major Principles of Psychological Theories
231(1)
Early Psychological Theories
232(6)
The Psychopathic Personality
232(4)
Personality Types and Crime
236(1)
Early Psychiatric Theories
237(1)
Criminal Behavior as Maladaption
238(6)
The Psychoanalytic Perspective
238(3)
The Psychotic Offender
241(2)
The Link Between Frustration and Aggression
243(1)
Crime as Adaptive Behavior
244(2)
Social Learning Theory
246(3)
Behavior Theory
249(2)
Insanity and the Law
251(6)
The McNaughten Rule
252(1)
The Irresistible Impulse Test
253(1)
The Durham Rule
254(1)
The Substantial Capacity Test
255(1)
The Brawner Rule
255(1)
Guilty but Insane
255(1)
Federal Provisions for the Hospitalization of Individuals Found ``Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity''
256(1)
Social Policy and Forensic Psychology
257(4)
Social Policy and the Psychology of Criminal Conduct
260(1)
Psychological Profiling
261(1)
Summary
262(1)
Discussion Questions
262(1)
Web Watch
263(1)
Notes
263(6)
Crime and the Role of the Social Environment
269(50)
Introduction
271(1)
Major Principles of Sociological Theories
272(1)
Sociological Theories
272(32)
The Chicago School
275(5)
Culture Conflict
280(1)
Subcultural Theory
281(4)
Violent Subcultures
285(5)
Crime and Social Structure
290(10)
Differential Association
300(1)
Criminal Careers and Life Course Theory
301(3)
Social Control Theories
304(3)
Containment Theory
304(2)
Social Bond Theory
306(1)
Policy Implications
307(4)
Critique of Social-Structural Theories
311(1)
Summary
311(1)
Web Watch
312(1)
Discussion Questions
313(1)
Notes
313(6)
The Meaning of Crime---Social Process Perspectives
319(38)
Introduction
320(1)
Major Principles of Social Process Perspectives
321(1)
Social Process Perspectives
322(29)
The Group Perspective: Labeling
322(6)
Reintegrative Shaming
328(1)
Dramaturgy
329(4)
Phenomenology
333(4)
Victimology: The Study of the Victim
337(13)
Policy Implications
350(1)
Summary
351(1)
Web Watch
352(1)
Discussion Questions
353(1)
Notes
353(4)
PART III CRIME IN THE MODERN WORLD 357(156)
Political Realities and Crime
359(32)
Introduction: Politics and Crime
360(1)
Law and Social Order Perspectives
361(8)
The Consensus Perspective
362(1)
The Pluralistic Perspective
363(2)
The Conflict Perspective
365(4)
Radical-Critical Criminology
369(8)
Radical Criminology Today
369(5)
Critical Criminology
374(1)
Radical-Critical Criminology and Policy Issues
375(1)
Critiques of Radical-Critical Criminology
376(1)
Terrorism
377(7)
Countering the Terrorist Threat
381(3)
State-Organized Crime
384(2)
Summary
386(1)
Discussion Questions
386(1)
Web Watch
387(1)
Notes
388(3)
White-Collar and Organized Crime
391(40)
Introduction
392(1)
White-Collar Crime
393(11)
Corporate Crime
396(3)
Definitional Evolution of White-Collar Crime
399(2)
Causes of White-Collar Crime
401(2)
Dealing with White-Collar Crime
403(1)
Organized Crime
404(21)
History of Organized Crime in the United States
405(1)
A Rose by Any Other Name---The Cosa Nostra
406(2)
Prohibition and Official Corruption
408(1)
Centralization of Organized Crime
409(3)
Cosa Nostra Today
412(1)
Activities of Organized Crime
412(3)
Code of Conduct
415(2)
Other Organized Criminal Groups
417(1)
Organized Crime and the Law
418(5)
Policy Issues: The Control of Organized Crime
423(2)
Summary
425(1)
Web Watch
426(1)
Discussion Questions
427(1)
Notes
427(4)
Drug Abuse and Crime
431(40)
Introduction
432(1)
History of Drug Abuse in the United States
433(8)
Extent of Abuse
435(3)
Costs of Abuse
438(3)
Types of Illegal Drugs
441(12)
Stimulants
447(2)
Depressants
449(1)
Cannabis
449(1)
Narcotics
450(1)
Hallucinogens
450(1)
Anabolic Steroids
451(1)
Inhalants
451(1)
Pharmaceutical Diversion and Dangerous Drugs
452(1)
Drug Trafficking
453(2)
Drugs and Crime
455(3)
Illegal Drugs and Official Corruption
457(1)
Social Policy and Drug Abuse
458(8)
Recent Legislation and Current Policy
460(3)
Policy Consequences
463(1)
Alternative Drug Policies
464(2)
Summary
466(1)
Discussion Questions
466(1)
Web Watch
467(1)
Notes
467(4)
The High-Tech Offender
471(42)
Introduction
472(1)
Crime and Technology
473(2)
High Technology and Criminal Opportunity
475(11)
Technology and Criminal Mischief
479(2)
Computer Crime and the Law
481(5)
A Profile of Computer Criminals
486(8)
The History and Nature of Hacking
489(4)
Computer Crime as a Form of White-Collar Crime
493(1)
The Information Superhighway and Data Security
494(2)
Technology in the Fight Against Crime
496(7)
DNA Fingerprinting
498(3)
Computers as Crime-Fighting Tools
501(2)
Combating Computer Crime
503(3)
Police Investigation of Computer Crime
504(1)
Dealing with Computer Criminals
505(1)
Policy Issues
506(2)
Personal Freedoms in the Information Age
506(2)
What the Future Holds
508(1)
Summary
509(1)
Web Watch
510(1)
Discussion Questions
510(1)
Notes
511(2)
PART IV RESPONDING TO CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR 513(80)
Criminology and Social Policy
515(40)
Introduction
516(2)
Federal Anticrime Initiatives
518(6)
The Hoover Administration
519(2)
Federal Policy Following World War II
521(2)
The Reagan-Bush Years
523(1)
Crime-Control Philosophies Today
524(7)
Types of Crime-Control Strategies
527(4)
Recent Federal Policy Initiatives
531(8)
The Brady Law
531(2)
The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994
533(5)
``Three-Strikes'' Legislation
538(1)
International Policies
539(1)
Can We Solve the Problem of Crime?
540(8)
Symbolism and Public Policy
542(6)
Summary
548(1)
Web Watch
549(1)
Discussion Questions
550(1)
Notes
550(5)
Future Directions in Criminology
555(38)
Introduction to the Future
556(2)
Future Crimes
558(2)
The New Criminologies
560(19)
Postmodern Criminology
562(2)
Rational Choice Theory
564(4)
Feminist Theory
568(5)
Peacemaking Criminology
573(3)
Realist Criminology
576(1)
Theory Integration
577(2)
Policies of the Future
579(5)
Summary
584(1)
Web Watch
585(1)
Discussion Questions
586(1)
Notes
586(7)
Glossary 593(16)
Subject Index 609(12)
Name Index 621


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