9780072555110

Critical Issues in Education : Dialogues and Dialectics

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780072555110

  • ISBN10:

    0072555114

  • Edition: 5th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 7/4/2003
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
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Table of Contents

Foreword xiii
Nel Noddings
Preface xvi
Introduction: Critical Issues and Critical Thinking
1(54)
Education and Schooling: Education as Controversy
2(7)
Democratic Vitality and Educational Criticism
9(5)
The Political Context of Schooling
14(3)
A Tradition of School Criticism and Reform
17(38)
Part One WHOSE INTERESTS SHOULD SCHOOLS SERVE? JUSTICE AND EQUITY
School Choice: Family or Public Funding
55(24)
Is family choice of schools in the public interest?
Position 1: For Family Choice in Education
55(10)
Position 2: Against Vouchers
65(14)
Financing Schools: Equity or Disparity
79(24)
Is it desirable to equalize educational spending among school districts within a state or across the nation?
Position 1: For Justice in Educational Finance
79(10)
Position 2: Against Centralization in Educational Financing
89(14)
The Academic Achievement Gap: Old Remedies or New
103(24)
Are already existing policies and practices reducing the academic achievement gap or are new measures needed?
Position 1: For Maintaining Existing Programs
103(11)
Position 2: For Innovative Solutions
114(13)
Gender Equity: Eliminating Discrimination or Making Legitimate Accommodations
127(24)
Is it ever necessary to create schools or classroom settings that separate students by gender?
Position 1: Eliminating Discrimination
127(9)
Position 2: For Making Legitimate Distinctions
136(15)
Standards-Based Reform: Real Change or Political Smoke Screen
151(19)
Will the standards-based reform movement improve education or discriminate against poor and disadvantaged students?
Position 1: Standards-Based Reform Promises Quality Education for All Students
151(8)
Position 2: Standards-Based Reform Is a Political Smoke Screen
159(11)
Religion--Church/State: Unification or Separation
170(22)
How do schools find a balance between freedom of religious expression and the separation of church and state?
Position 1: For Religious Freedom in Schools
170(9)
Position 2: Against Violating the Separation Between Church and State
179(13)
Privatization of Schools: Boon or Bane
192(43)
What criteria are most suitable for deciding whether schools are better when they are operated as a public or private enterprise?
Position 1: Public Schools Should Be Privatized
192(10)
Position 2: Public Schools Should Be Public
202(33)
Part Two WHAT SHOULD BE TAUGHT? KNOWLEDGE AND LITERACY
Basic Education: Traditional or Critical
235(23)
What are the main characteristics of ``fundamental knowledge,'' and who should make that judgment?
Position 1: Teach the Basic Disciplines
235(9)
Position 2: Teach for Critical Thinking
244(14)
Reading: Phonics or Whole Language
258(21)
What is the most effective approach for teaching children to read: phonics or whole language?
Position 1: The Phonics Argument
258(8)
Position 2: The Whole-Language Argument
266(13)
Multicultural Education: Democratic or Divisive
279(19)
Should schools emphasize America's cultural diversity or the shared aspects of American culture?
Position 1: Multiculturalism: Central to a Democratic Education
279(8)
Position 2: Multiculturalism Is Divisive and Destructive
287(11)
Values/Character Education: Traditional or Liberational
298(26)
Which and whose values should public schools teach the young, and why?
Position 1: Teach Traditional Values
298(11)
Position 2: Liberation Through Active Value Inquiry
309(15)
Technological Literacy: Necessary or Excessive
324(30)
How should we determine which technological knowledge deserves significant school attention?
Position 1: For Fully Integrated Technological Literacy: Technology Holds the Promise
324(13)
Position 2: Against Technological Excess: For Critical Technological Education
337(17)
Standardized Testing: Restrict or Expand
354(31)
Should the use of standardized school tests be increased or decreased?
Position 1: For Restricting Testing
354(8)
Position 2: For Expanding Testing
362(23)
Part Three HOW SHOULD SCHOOLS BE ORGANIZED AND OPERATED? SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT
Instructional Leadership: Teachers or Administrators
385(17)
Should teachers be given a larger role in running public schools?
Position 1: For Teachers as Instructional Leaders
385(6)
Position 2: For Principals as Instructional Leaders
391(11)
Academic Freedom: Teacher Rights or Responsibilities
402(24)
How should the proper balance between teacher freedom and responsibility be determined?
Position 1: For Teacher Responsibility
402(9)
Position 2: For Increased Academic Freedom
411(15)
Teacher Unions: Detrimental or Beneficial to Education
426(15)
Are teacher unions good or bad for education?
Position 1: Teacher Unions Are Detrimental
426(5)
Position 2: Teacher Unions Are Beneficial to Education
431(10)
Inclusion and Mainstreaming: Special or Common Education
441(27)
When and why should selected children be provided inclusive or special treatment in schools?
Position 1: For Full Inclusion
441(11)
Position 2: Special Programs for Special Students
452(16)
School Violence: School Treatable or Beyond School Control
468
Can schools deal effectively with violent or potentially violent students?
Position 1: Schools Can and Should Curb Violence
468(7)
Position 2: The Problem of School Violence Is Beyond School Control
475
Index 1

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