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Cultural Conversations : The Presence of the Past,9780312201579

Cultural Conversations : The Presence of the Past

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780312201579

ISBN10:
0312201575
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/20/2001
Publisher(s):
Bedford/St. Martin's
List Price: $72.45

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Summary

This unique new thematic composition reader brings together 6 key texts from the past and multiple contemporary reverberations to engage students in some of today's most significant cultural conversations.

Author Biography

STEPHEN DILKS (Ph.D. Rutgers University) is Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Missouri–Kansas City.

REGINA HANSEN (Ph.D. Boston College) is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric at the College of General Studies, Boston University.

MATTHEW PARFITT (Ph.D. Boston College) is Associate Professor and Rhetoric Coordinator at the College of General Studies, Boston University.

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors v
Introduction 1(16)
Gender: Is One Born a Woman?
17(110)
Text
19(24)
From A Room of One's Own
19(24)
Virginia Woolf
``It is fatal to be a man or woman pure and simple; one must be woman-manly or man-womanly.''
Context
43(21)
From The New Generation of Women
44(2)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
From Orlando
46(5)
Virginia Woolf
Studio Portrait of Virginia Woolf, 1925
51(1)
Dust Jacket for A Room of One's Own
52(1)
Vanessa Bell
The Four Marys
53(1)
Reviews of A Room of One's Own
From The Criterion
54(3)
Orlo Williams
From The Yale Review
57(2)
Elisabeth Woodbridge
Anonymous Review from Punch
59(1)
From ``Queen of the High-Brows,'' Evening Standard
59(2)
Arnold Bennett
Anonymous Review from Times Literary Supplement
61(3)
Contemporary Conversation
64(60)
Feminism: A Movement to End Sexist Oppression
64(14)
Bell Hooks
``To emphasize ... engagement with feminist struggle as political commitment we could avoid using the phrase `I am a feminist' (a linguistic structure designed to refer to some personal aspect of identity and self-definition) and could state `I advocate feminism.'''
The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action
78(4)
Audre Lorde
``... we have been socialized to respect fear more than our own needs for language and definition, and while we wait in silence for that final luxury of fearlessness, the weight of that silence will choke us.''
Owning the Self in a Disowned World (a menagerie of nightmares and hallucinations)
82(17)
Patricia Williams
``I wonder, in my disintegration into senselessness, in whom I shall be reborn. What would `the white Pat Williams' look like? Have I yet given birth to myself as `the black Pat Williams'?''
From The Straight Mind and Other Essays
99(1)
Monique Wittig
The Category of Sex
100(5)
One Is Not Born a Woman
105(8)
``The category of sex is the category that ordains slavery for women, and it works specifically, as it did for black slaves, through an operation of reduction, by taking the part for the whole...''
Sex and Gender
113(11)
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
``The newly virulent homophobia of the past decade, directed alike against women and men even though logically its medical pretext ought...to give a relative exemptive privilege to lesbians, reminds ungently that it is more to our friends than to our enemies that sexually nonconforming women and men are perceptible as distinct groups.''
Extending Your Work
124(3)
African American Identity: How Does Race Shape the Arts?
127(82)
Text
128(19)
From The Souls of Black Folk
128(2)
W. E. B. Du Bois
Of Our Spiritual Strivings
130(6)
The Sorrow Songs
``It is a peculiar sensation, this double consciouness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness, --- an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings...''
136(11)
Context
147(16)
The Negro Speaks of Rivers
148(1)
Langston Hughes
Portrait of W. E. B. Du Bois
149(1)
The Atlanta Exposition Address
150(3)
Booker T. Washington
Motive of the NAACP Exposed
153(2)
Marcus Garvey
Our Raison d'Etre
155(1)
Anna Julia Cooper
Ethiopia
156(1)
Frances E. W. Harper
Anonymous Review of The Souls of Black Folk, New York Times
157(2)
From Criteria of Negro Art
159(3)
W. E. B. Du Bois
Go Down Moses
162(1)
Contemporary Conversation
163(44)
In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens
163(9)
Alice Walker
``But when, you will ask, did my overworked mother have time to know or care about feeding the creative spirit? ``The answer is so simple that many of us have spent years discovering it. We have constantly looked high, when we should have looked high---and low.''
Free at Last? A Personal Perspective on Race and Identity in America
172(9)
Glenn Loury
``I no longer believe that the camaraderie engendered among blacks by our collective experience of racism constitutes an adequate basis for any person's self-definition.''
Lethal Weapons and City Games
181(19)
Hazel Carby
``What Grand Canyon, the Lethal Weapon series, and a number of other contemporary Hollywood films have in common is their unspoken attempt to resolve and overcome a national, racialized crisis through an intimate interracial male partnership.''
From Fly-Girls to Bitches and Hos
200(7)
Joan Morgan
``Like it or not, hip-hop is not only the dominion of the young, black and male, it is also the world in which young black women live and survive. A functional game plan for us... has to recognize hip-hop's ability to articulate the pain our community is in and use that knowledge to create a redemptive, healing space.''
Extending Your Work
207(2)
Disabled Persons: How Do Individuals Form a Culture?
209(102)
Text
210(13)
From The World I Live In
210(2)
Helen Keller
The Seeing Hand
212(3)
The Five-Sensed World
215(2)
Analogies in Sense Perception
217(2)
Before the Soul Dawn
219(4)
``Our blindness changes not a whit the course of inner realities. Of us it is as true as it is of the seeing that the most beautiful world is always entered through imagination.''
Context
223(12)
Remarks upon Meeting Miss Laura Bridgman
223(1)
Charles Dickens
Upon the Formation of a Deaf Variety of the Human Race
224(2)
Alexander Graham Bell
Letter on Behalf of Helen Keller
226(1)
Mark Twain
Advertisement for The World I Live In, New York Times Saturday Review
227(1)
Anonymous Review of The World I Live In, New York Times Book Review
227(1)
From The Story of My Life
228(2)
Helen Keller
The Water-Pump Scene from William Gibson's The Miracle Worker
230(1)
Photograph of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan
231(1)
Photograph of Helen Keller, Annie Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell
232(1)
Photograph of Helen Keller with Winged Victory
233(1)
Photograph of Twelve-Year-Old Helen with John Hitz
234(1)
Contemporary Conversation
235(73)
Protest at Gallaudet
235(27)
Oliver Sacks
``Now, for the first time, there was an `identity' for the deaf, not merely a personal one, but a social, cultural one. They were no longer just individuals, with an individual's plights or triumphs; they were a people, with their own culture, like the Jews or the Welsh.''
Representations of Deaf People: The Infirmity and Cultural Models
262(11)
Harlan Lane
``Most people who were born deaf or became so early in life ... and who grew up deaf as part of the deaf community have a different point of view. They see themselves as fundamentally visual people, with their own language, social organization, history, and mores---in short, with their own way of being, their own language and culture.''
Blind Rage: An Open Letter to Helen Keller
273(7)
Georgiana Kleege
``... Helen ... you couldn't help yourself. Once you figured out that the only way your words would be read by anyone was if you took on the role of the first, original disability poster child.''
Reassigning Meaning
280(19)
Simi Linton
``... the medicalization of disability casts human variation as deviance from the norm, as pathological condition, as deficit, and, significantly, as an individual burden and personal tragedy.''
Getting Hip to the Lights-Out Way
299(9)
Slackjaw
``Suicide no longer interests me. Nor do I have any interest in becoming one of those over-compensatory types who learns how to ski and sky-dive. Nor am I interested in joining the blind subculture, full of blind people talking about blind things all the time, wasting their days wallowing in memories of sight.''
Extending Your Work
308(3)
The Unconscious: How Can We Understand Ourselves?
311(132)
Text
314(43)
From A Fragment of an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria
314(1)
Sigmund Freud
The Clinical Picture
315(24)
The Second Dream
339(18)
``I let the patient himself choose the subject of the day's work, and in that way I start out from whatever surface his unconsious happens to be presenting to his notice at the moment. But on this plan everything that has to do with the clearing-up of a particular symptom emerges piecemeal, woven into various contexts, and distributed over widely separated periods of time.''
Context
357(17)
Picture of Jean-Martin Charcot with Patient and Observers
358(1)
Drawing of Electric Brush and Probe Used to Treat Hysteria before Freud
359(1)
From The Hidden Self
359(2)
William James
Photograph of Freud's Consulting Room in Vienna
361(1)
Photograph of Freud in 1906
362(1)
From Veiling and Unveiling Psychotherapy
363(3)
Fritz Wittels
From Postscript to Dora Case
366(2)
Sigmund Freud
From Determinism and Superstition
368(1)
Sigmund Freud
Summary of Early Responses to the Dora Analysis
369(3)
Ernest Jones
``Stangled Emotion,'' New York Times
372(2)
Contemporary Conversation
374(64)
Scientia Sexualis
374(15)
Michel Foucault
``The essential point is that sex was not only a matter of sensation and pleasure, of law and taboo, but also of truth and falsehood, that the truth of sex became something fundamental, useful, or dangerous, precious or formidable: in short, that sex was constituted as a problem of truth.''
Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle
389(18)
Carol Gilligan
``Only when life-cycle theorists divide their attention and begin to live with women as they have lived with men will their vision encompass the experience of both sexes and their theories become correspondingly more fertile.''
Histories
407(13)
Carolyn Steedman
``Using these two accounts [of Dora and the watercress girl], we may suddenly see the nineteenth century peopled by middle-aged men who, propelled by the compulsions of scientific inquiry, demanded stories from young women and girls; and then expressed their dissatisfaction with the form of the narratives they obtained.''
Dora
420(18)
Janet Malcolm
``Today, everyone knows---except possible a few literary theorists---that the chief subject of the psychoanalytic dialogue is not the patient's repressed memories but the analyst's vacation.''
Extending Your Work
438(5)
Nonviolence: A Weapon of Peace?
443(84)
Text
444(17)
Mahatma Gandhi
The Theory and Practice of Passive Resistance
445(2)
Meaning of Satyagraha
447(2)
Religion of Nonviolence
449(2)
The Law of Suffering
451(2)
The Doctrine of the Sword I
453(3)
The Doctrine of the Sword II
456(5)
``Only those who realize that there is something in man which is superior to the brute nature in him, and that the latter always yields to it, can effectively be Passive Resisters.''
Context
461(10)
The Sermon on the Mount, 5.38-39
461(1)
Matthew
From the Bhagavad Gita: The Yoga of Renunciation
461(3)
Letter to Gandhi
464(2)
Leo Tolstoy
Letter to Gandhi and Accompanying Poems
466(1)
Rabindranath Tagore
All-India Radio Speech following the Assassination of Gandhi
467(2)
Jawaharlal Nehru
Photograph of Young, Westernized Gandhi
469(1)
Photograph of Gandhi Picking Up Salt on the Beach at Dandi
470(1)
Contemporary Conversation
471(53)
Letter from Birmingham Jail
471(16)
Martin Luther King Jr.
``I submit that an individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for the law.''
Ideologies of Madness
487(9)
Susan Griffin
``The illusion this civilization retains, that we are somehow above nature, is so severe that in a sense we have come to believe that we can end material existence without dying. The absurdity of nuclear weaponry as a strategy for defense, when the use of those weapons would annihilate us, would in itself argue this.''
Nonviolent Social Defense
496(9)
Petra Kelly
``Independent, resourceful, freedom-loving people that are prepared and organized to resist aggression cannot be conquered. No number of tanks and missiles can dominate a society unwilling to cooperate.''
Resistance and the Will to Resistance
505(6)
Susanne Kappeler
``If white fascists are against the rights of Black people and thus against Black people, we seem to think it fit to describe them as being in resistance to them. Resistance is demoted to a mere synonym for opposition---aggresive enmity---ennobled by the positive connotations of a beleagured fight against oppression.''
Nonviolence and Peacemaking Today
511(13)
Michael Nagler
``Once we accept that violence tears at the fabric of life (and nonviolence repairs it), it becomes clear that there are endless ways nonvilent energy could be brought to bear on almost any relationship.''
Extending Your Work
524(3)
The Frontier: How Do We Imagine the West?
527(134)
Text
529(25)
The Significance of the Frontier in American History
529(25)
Frederick Jackson Turner
``Since the days when the fleet of Columbus sailed into the waters of the New World, America has been another name for opportunity, and the people of the United States have taken their tone from the incessant expansion which has not only been open but has even been forced upon them.''
Context
554(17)
From The Great West; or The Garden of the World
555(2)
C. W. Dana
From Ranch Life in the Far West
557(4)
Theodore Roosevelt
Photograph of a ``Dugout'' Home, exterior
561(1)
Photograph of a ``Dugout'' Home, interior
561(1)
Plenty Coups Travels to Washington
562(2)
Plenty Coups
We Want to Tell You Something
564(2)
Albert Yava
Map of Native American Diasporas
566(2)
Photograph of Leadville, Colorado, ca. 1890
568(3)
Contemporary Conversation
571(81)
Denial and Dependence
571(16)
Patricia Nelson Limerick
``As powerful and persistent as the fantasy that the West set Americans free from relying on the federal government was the fantasy that westward movement could set one free from the past.''
At the Buffalo Bill Museum, June 1988
587(18)
Jane Tompkins
``I cannot resolve the contradiction between my experience at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center ... and my response to the shining figure of Buffalo Bill as it emerged from the pages of books---on the one hand a history of shame; on the other, an image of the heart's desire. But I have reached one conclusion that for a while will have to serve.''
Unearthing Herstory
605(11)
Annette Kolodny
``... we need ... a radically new symbolic mode for relating to `the fairest, frutefullest, and pleasauntest [land] of all the worlde'; we can no longer afford to keep turning `America the Beautiful' into America the Raped.''
America's Debt to the Indian Nations: Atoning for a Sordid Past
616(3)
Leslie Marmon Silko
The Border Patrol State
619(6)
``The American public has difficultly believing such injustice continues to be inflicted upon Indian people because Amercians assume that the sympathy or tolerance they feel toward Indians is somehow felt or transferred to the government policy that deals with Indians. This is not the case.''
The American West and the Burden of Belief
625(15)
N. Scott Momaday
``The oral tradition demands the greatest clarity of speech and hearing, the whole strength of memory, and an absolute faith in the efficacy of language. Every word spoken, every word heard, is the utterance of prayer.''
Unsettling Frontiers: Billy the Kid and the Outlaw Southwest
640(12)
Eric Gary Anderson
``Despite Turner's footnoted refusal to speak of outlaws, then, the outlaw as satanic antihero was a well-known and very popular figure, and as the `archfiend' of them all, Billy the Kid was fast attaining the status of national legend.''
Extending Your Work
652(9)
Index of Authors and Titles 661


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