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Curious Writer, The: Concise Edition,9780321437815

Curious Writer, The: Concise Edition

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780321437815

ISBN10:
0321437810
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $60.00
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Summary

The Curious Writerby Bruce Ballenger is an assignment-oriented, all-in-one rhetoric-reader-handbook that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing. The Curious Writer emphasizes research as a key part of the writing process, encourages revision throughout the writing assignment chapters, and places strong emphasis on critical reading skills. Topics include research, writing process, and revision process. Both student and professional readings are included, up-to-date coverage of computers and the Internet includes tips on using the Internet as a research tool. General interest; improving writing skills.

Table of Contents

Instructor Preface xix
Student Preface xxviii
Writing as Inquiry
3(34)
Motives for Writing
4(1)
Beliefs About Writing
5(6)
Inquiring into the Details Journals
7(1)
Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs
8(1)
The Beliefs of This Book
9(1)
Inquiring into the Details Portfolios
10(1)
Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices
11(2)
Habits of Mind
13(7)
Start with Questions, Not Answers
13(1)
Suspend Judgment
14(1)
Writing with Computers
15(1)
Search for Surprise
16(2)
Inquiring into the Details Invention Strategies
18(2)
Writing as a Process
20(14)
Recognizing the Challenges
20(5)
Thinking About Your Process
25(1)
Linear versus Recursive Models
26(2)
Dialectical Thinking
28(6)
Using What You Have Learned
34(3)
Reading as Inquiry
37(28)
Motives for Reading
38(1)
Beliefs About Reading
39(2)
Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices
41(2)
Reading as a Process
43(15)
Linear versus Recursive Models
43(1)
Reading Jack Hitt, Excerpt from ``Dinosaur Dreams''
44(2)
Inquiring into the Details Reading Perspectives
46(1)
Dialectical Thinking
47(1)
Believing and Doubting
48(1)
Reading Bruce Ballenger, ``The Importance of Writing Badly''
49(4)
Inquiring into the Details The Double-Entry Journal
53(1)
Adapting to Unfamiliar Reading Situations
54(1)
Reading David W. Noble, Excerpt from The Forces of Production
55(2)
Writing with Computers
57(1)
``Reading'' Images
58(5)
Some Strategies for Reading Images
58(5)
Using What You Have Learned
63(2)
Ways of Inquiring
65(28)
Opening Questions for Inquiry
66(2)
Exploration
68(4)
Explanation
72(5)
Evaluation
77(5)
Reading Peter Sacks, Excerpt from ``Generation X Goes to College''
81(1)
Reflection
82(3)
Symphonic Inquiry
85(6)
Reading Stephen Corey, ``A Voice for the Lonely''
86(5)
Writing with Computers
91(1)
Using What You Have Learned
91(2)
Writing a Personal Essay
93(46)
Writing About Experience
93(1)
Motives for Writing a Personal Essay
94(1)
Personal Essays and Academic Writing
95(1)
Features of the Form
96(19)
Personal Essay Barbara Kingsolver, ``Life Without Go-Go Boots''
97(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
100(1)
Personal Essay Bailey White, ``Forbidden Things''
101(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
104(1)
Personal Essay Judith Ortiz Cofer, ``Silent Dancing''
105(7)
Inquiring into the Essay
112(1)
Seeing the Form Self-Portrait by Frances Benjamin Johnston
113(2)
The Writing Process
115(22)
Thinking About Subjects
115(1)
Generating Ideas
116(1)
Listing Prompts
116(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
117(1)
Visual Prompts
117(2)
Inquiring into the Details Clustering or Mapping
119(1)
Research Prompts
120(1)
Judging What You Have
120(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
121(1)
Questions About Purpose and Audience
121(1)
Questions for Reflection
122(1)
Writing the Sketch
122(1)
Writing with Computers
123(1)
Student Sketch Lana Kuchta, ``The Way I Remember''
124(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
126(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
126(1)
Questions for Peer Review
127(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
127(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
127(2)
Composing the Draft
129(1)
Methods of Development
129(1)
Using Evidence
130(1)
Workshopping the Draft
131(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
131(1)
Questions for Readers
131(1)
Revising the Draft
132(1)
Polishing the Draft
133(1)
Student Essay Micaela Fisher, ``Holy Jealousy''
134(2)
Evaluating the Essay
136(1)
Using What You Have Learned
137(2)
Writing a Review
139(44)
Writing That Evaluates
139(1)
Motives for Writing a Review
140(1)
The Review and Academic Writing
141(1)
Features of the Form
142(17)
Review Bryan Curtis, ``The Best Little Chophouse in Town''
145(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
147(1)
Review Neal Pollack, ``Rock On? Yeah, in Chairs''
148(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
151(1)
Review Ann Hodgman, ``No Wonder They Call Me a Bitch''
152(4)
Inquiring into the Essay
156(1)
Seeing the Form Choosing the Best Picture
157(2)
The Writing Process
159(22)
Thinking About Subjects
160(1)
Generating Ideas
160(1)
Listing Prompts
160(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
161(1)
Visual Prompts
161(1)
Research Prompts
161(1)
Writing with Computers
162(1)
Judging What You Have
162(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
162(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
163(3)
Thinking About Criteria
166(1)
Inquiring into the Details Collaborating on Criteria
167(1)
Writing the Sketch
168(1)
Student Sketch Mike Peterson, ``Gladiator: Good Hollywood''
168(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
170(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
170(1)
Questions for Peer Review
171(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
171(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
171(1)
Re-experience
171(1)
Interview
172(1)
Read
172(1)
Composing the Draft
172(1)
Methods of Development
173(1)
Using Evidence
174(1)
Workshopping the Draft
175(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
175(1)
Questions for Readers
175(1)
Revising the Draft
176(1)
Polishing the Draft
177(1)
Student Essay Mike Peterson, ``Open Your Eyes, Cameron Crowe''
178(2)
Evaluating the Essay
180(1)
Using What You Have Learned
181(2)
Writing a Proposal
183(44)
Writing About Problems and Solutions
183(3)
Problems of Consequence
184(1)
Problems of Scale
185(1)
Motives for Writing Proposals
186(1)
The Proposal and Academic Writing
187(1)
Features of the Form
187(16)
Proposal Maia Szalavitz, ``Stand and Deliver''
189(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
192(1)
Proposal James Howard Kunstler and Nikos A. Salingaros, ``The End of Tall Buildings''
193(5)
Inquiring into the Essay
198(1)
Proposal Caroline Hsu, ``Is It Time to Ditch Senior Year?''
199(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
201(1)
Seeing the Form Stop Torturing Chicks?
202(1)
The Writing Process
203(22)
Thinking About Subjects
204(1)
Generating Ideas
204(1)
Listing Prompts
204(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
204(2)
Inquiring into the Details Causation
206(1)
Visual Prompts
207(1)
Research Prompts
207(1)
Judging What You Have
208(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
208(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
209(1)
Questions of Form
209(1)
Research Considerations
210(1)
Writing the Sketch
210(1)
Student Sketch Amy Garrett, ``The Happy Cow''
211(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
212(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
212(1)
Questions for Peer Review
212(1)
Writing with Computers
213(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
214(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
214(1)
Composing the Draft
215(1)
Methods of Development
216(1)
Using Evidence
217(1)
Inquiring into the Details Evidence---A Case Study
218(1)
Workshopping the Draft
218(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
218(1)
Questions for Readers
219(1)
Revising the Draft
219(1)
Polishing the Draft
220(1)
Student Essay Amy Garrett, ``The Happy Cow''
221(4)
Evaluating the Essay
225(1)
Using What You Have Learned
225(2)
Writing an Argument
227(46)
Writing to Persuade People
227(5)
Getting into Arguments
228(2)
Making Claims
230(1)
Two Sides to Every Argument?
231(1)
Motives for Writing an Argument
232(1)
The Argument and Academic Writing
233(1)
Features of the Form
234(13)
Argument Amitai Etzioni, ``Law and Order and the Wild, Wild Web''
236(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
239(1)
Inquiring into the Details Some Basic Argument Strategies
239(1)
Argument George F. Will, ``The `Growth Model' and the Growth of Illiteracy''
240(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
242(1)
Argument Doris Lessing, ``What We Think of America''
243(1)
Inquiring into the Essay
244(1)
Seeing the Form Guess.com Ad
245(2)
The Writing Process
247(24)
Thinking About Subjects
247(1)
Generating Ideas
248(1)
Listing Prompts
248(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
249(1)
Visual Prompts
250(1)
Research Prompts
250(2)
Writing with Computers
252(1)
Judging What You Have
252(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
252(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
253(1)
Research Considerations
254(2)
Inquiring into the Details Thinking Globally, Acting Locally
256(1)
Narrowing the Question
256(1)
Writing the Sketch
257(1)
Student Sketch Ben Bloom, ``How to Really Rock the Vote''
257(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
258(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
258(1)
Questions for Peer Review
259(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
260(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
260(1)
Composing the Draft
261(1)
Methods of Development
261(2)
Inquiring into the Details What Evidence Can Do
263(1)
Using Evidence
264(1)
Workshopping the Draft
264(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
264(1)
Questions for Readers
265(1)
Inquiring into the Details Ten Common Logical Fallacies
265(2)
Revising the Draft
267(1)
Polishing the Draft
268(1)
Student Essay Kelly Sundberg, ``I Am Not a Savage''
269(2)
Evaluating the Essay
271(1)
Using What You Have Learned
271(2)
Writing a Critical Essay
273(50)
Writing About Literature
273(1)
Motives for Writing a Critical Essay
274(1)
The Critical Essay and Academic Writing
275(1)
Features of the Form
276(26)
Short Story Leslie Marmon Silko, ``Lullaby''
277(8)
Inquiring into the Story
285(1)
Short Story Alice Walker, ``Everyday Use''
286(8)
Inquiring into the Story
294(1)
Critical Essay John Gruesser, ``Animal Imagery in `Everyday Use'''
295(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
297(1)
Seeing the Form Christina's World
298(4)
Andrew Wyeth
The Writing Process
302(19)
Thinking About Subjects
302(1)
Generating Ideas
303(1)
Listing Prompts
303(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
304(1)
Visual Prompts
304(1)
Research Prompts
305(1)
Inquiring into the Details Common Literary Devices
305(2)
Judging What You Have
307(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
307(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
308(2)
Writing a Sketch
310(1)
Student Sketch Julie Bird, ``What Is the Role of Nature in `Lullaby'?''
310(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
311(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
311(1)
Questions for Peer Review
312(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
312(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
312(2)
Composing the Draft
314(1)
Methods of Development
314(1)
Using Evidence
315(1)
Workshopping the Draft
315(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
315(1)
Questions for Readers
316(1)
Revising the Draft
316(1)
Polishing the Draft
317(1)
Student Essay Julie Bird, ``Nature as Being: Landscape in Silko's `Lullaby'''
318(3)
Evaluating the Essay
321(1)
Using What You Have Learned
321(2)
Research Techniques
323(42)
Methods of Collecting
323(1)
Research in the Electronic Age
324(8)
The Magic Words That Open Doors
325(1)
How Librarians Organize Books
326(2)
Library of Congress Subject Headings
328(1)
Google Your Boole
328(4)
Developing Working Knowledge
332(8)
Searching Key Library References
333(3)
Inquiring into the Details Methods of Recording Information
336(1)
Conducting Subject Surveys on the Web
337(2)
Inquiring into the Details The Working Bibliography
339(1)
Evaluating Library Sources
340(1)
Evaluating Web Sources
341(4)
Developing Deep Knowledge
345(8)
Finding Books
345(1)
Inquiring into the Details How to Annotate a Book
346(1)
Finding Periodicals
346(1)
Finding Newspapers
347(1)
Finding Sources on the Web
347(1)
Writing in the Middle: Synthesizing Source Information and Your Own Ideas
348(1)
Writing with Computers
349(1)
Double-Entry Journal
350(1)
Research Log
350(3)
Interviews
353(4)
Arranging Interviews
353(1)
Making Contact
354(1)
Conducting the Interview
355(1)
Using the Interview in Your Writing
356(1)
Surveys
357(4)
Defining a Survey's Goals and Audience
358(1)
Types of Survey Questions
358(1)
Crafting Survey Questions
359(1)
Conducting a Survey
360(1)
Using Survey Results in Your Writing
360(1)
Knowing When to Stop
361(1)
Using What You Have Learned
362(3)
Using and Citing Sources
365(80)
Controlling Information
365(1)
Using Sources
366(5)
Summarizing
367(1)
Paraphrasing
368(1)
Quoting
369(2)
Citing Sources
371(4)
Writing with Computers
372(1)
Avoiding Plagiarism
372(3)
MLA Documentation Guidelines
375(42)
Inquiring into the Details The Common Knowledge Exception
376(1)
Citing Sources
376(1)
Where to Put Citations
377(1)
Inquiring into the Details Citations That Go with the Flow
378(1)
When You Mention the Author's Name
379(1)
When There Is No Author
379(1)
Works by the Same Author
380(1)
When One Source Quotes Another
380(1)
Personal Interviews
380(1)
Several Sources in a Single Citation
381(1)
Sample Parenthetical References for Other Sources
381(2)
Format
383(1)
The Layout
383(3)
Preparing the ``Works Cited'' Page
386(1)
Format
387(1)
Citing Books
388(1)
Sample Book Citations
389(4)
Citing Periodicals
393(1)
Sample Periodical Citations
394(3)
Citing Nonprint and Other Sources
397(2)
Citing ``Portable'' Databases
399(2)
Citing Online Databases
401(2)
Sample Online Citations
403(5)
A Sample Paper in MLA Style
408(1)
Student Essay Amy Garrett, ``We Need the Sun''
408(9)
Evaluating the Essay
417(1)
APA Documentation Guidelines
417(26)
Inquiring into the Details Recent APA Style Changes
418(1)
How the Essay Should Look
419(1)
Page Format
419(1)
Title Page
419(1)
Abstract
419(1)
Body of the Paper
420(1)
References Page
421(1)
Appendix
421(1)
Notes
421(1)
Tables and Figures
422(1)
Language and Style
422(1)
Citing Sources in Your Essay
423(1)
When the Author Is Mentioned in the Text
423(1)
When the Author Isn't Mentioned in the Text
423(1)
When to Cite Page Numbers
423(1)
A Single Work by Two or More Authors
423(1)
A Work with No Author
424(1)
Two or More Works by the Same Author
424(1)
An Institutional Author
424(1)
Multiple Works in the Same Parentheses
424(1)
Interviews, E-mail, and Letters
425(1)
New Editions of Old Works
425(1)
A Web Site
425(1)
Preparing the ``References'' List
425(1)
Order of Sources
425(1)
Order of Information
426(1)
Sample References
427(5)
Citing Electronic Sources
432(1)
Sample References
432(4)
A Sample Paper in APA Style
436(1)
Student Essay Jeremy Johnson, ``I See Me as You See Me: An Ethnography of West Junior High''
436(7)
Evaluating the Essay
443(1)
Using What You Have Learned
443(2)
Revision Strategies
445
Reseeing Your Topic
445(1)
Divorcing the Draft
446(1)
Strategies for Divorcing the Draft
447(1)
Five Categories of Revision
448(2)
Writing with Computers
449(1)
Problems of Purpose
450(6)
Revision Strategy 11.1: What's Your Primary Motive?
452(1)
Revision Strategy 11.2: What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?
453(1)
Revision Strategy 11.3: Finding the Focusing Question
454(1)
Revision Strategy 11.4: What's the Relationship?
455(1)
Problems with Meaning
456(7)
Implicit or Explicit Meaning
456(1)
Looking Beyond the Obvious
457(1)
Methods for Discovering Your Thesis
458(1)
Revision Strategy 11.5: Find the ``Instructive Line''
458(1)
Revision Strategy 11.6: Looping Toward a Thesis
459(1)
Revision Strategy 11.7: Reclaiming Your Topic
460(1)
Revision Strategy 11.8: Believing and Doubting
461(1)
Methods for Refining Your Thesis
462(1)
Revision Strategy 11.9: Questions as Knives
462(1)
Problems with Information
463(4)
Revision Strategy 11.10: Explode a Moment
464(1)
Revision Strategy 11.11: Beyond Examples
464(2)
Revision Strategy 11.12: Research
466(1)
Problems with Structure
467(6)
Formal Academic Structures
467(1)
Revision Strategy 11.13: Reorganizing around Thesis and Support
467(2)
Revision Strategy 11.14: Multiple Leads
469(1)
Inquiring into the Details Types of Leads
470(1)
Revision Strategy 11.15: The Frankenstein Draft
471(1)
Revision Strategy 11.16: Make an Outline
472(1)
Problems of Clarity and Style
473(9)
Solving Problems of Clarity
474(1)
Revision Strategy 11.17: Untangling Paragraphs
474(2)
Inquiring into the Details Transition Flags
476(1)
Revision Strategy 11.18: Cutting Clutter
476(2)
Revision Strategy 11.19: The Actor and the Action Next Door
478(1)
Improving Style
479(1)
Revision Strategy 11.20: Actors and Actions
479(2)
Revision Strategy 11.21: Smoothing the Choppiness
481(1)
Revision Strategy 11.22: Fresh Ways to Say Things
482(1)
Using What You Have Learned
482
Credits 1(1)
Index 1


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