9780134150796

Curious Writer, Concise Edition, The, Plus MyWritingLab -- Access Card Package

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  • ISBN13:

    9780134150796

  • ISBN10:

    0134150791

  • Edition: 5th
  • Format: Package
  • Copyright: 2/11/2016
  • Publisher: Pearson

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For courses in First-Year Composition - Rhetoric.
This package includes MyWritingLab™.

Puts inquiry at the heart of good writing
We write to learn as much as we do to express what we already know. In his remarkably personal and engaging voice, Bruce Ballenger makes that powerful concept central to The Curious Writer, Concise Edition.

The Curious Writer, Concise Edition doesn’t read like a textbook or provide a formula for composing essays. Instead, it encourages students to suspend judgment, to ask questions, and to seek answers much like academics do. Yet it covers a wide range of genres beyond the academic essay—narrative, profile, review, ethnography, argument, and more—all with a distinctive approach and “personality” that is lacking in other texts. It also reinforces the assumption that genres are malleable with a new chapter on repurposing or “re-genre-ing.” 

Students love that this book helps them learn to write by pursuing their own curiosity. Teachers appreciate that Ballenger provides ample opportunities for students to develop the habits of mind necessary to become critical thinkers and curious writers.

Personalize learning with MyWritingLab™
MyWritingLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts. 

0134150791 / 9780134150796 The Curious Writer, Concise Edition Plus MyWritingLab without Pearson eText – Access Card Package
 Package consists of:
  • 0133933296 / 9780133933291  MyWritingLab without Pearson eText – Access Card
  • 013393330X / 9780133933307 MyWritingLab without Pearson eText – Inside Star Sticker
  • 0134120701 / 9780134120706  The Curious Writer, Concise Edition

Table of Contents

1. Writing as Inquiry

Motives for Writing

Beliefs About Writing and Writing Development

Exercise 1.1 This I Believe (and This I Don’t)

One Student’s Response Bernice’s Journal

Inquiring into the Details Journals

Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs

The Beliefs of This Book

Allatonceness

Believing You Can Learn to Write Well

Habits of Mind

Starting with Questions, Not Answers

Making the Familiar Strange

Suspending Judgment

Being Willing to Write Badly

Searching for Surprise

Exercise 1.2 A Roomful of Details

One Student’s Response  Bernice’s Journal

Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices

A First Reflection on Your Writing Process

A Case Study

Thinking About Your Process

Exercise 1.3 Literacy Narrative Collage

Exercise 1.4 What Is Your Process?

Problem Solving in Your Writing Process

The Nature of the Writing Process

The Writing Process as Recursive and Flexible

A System for Using Writing to Think

Inquiring into the Details  Invention Strategies

Exercise 1.5 Two Kinds of Thinking

A Writing Process That Harnesses Two Currents of Thought

The Sea and the Mountain

Answering the So What? Question

A Writing Process Driven by Questions

A Strategy of Inquiry: Questioning, Generating, and Judging

Exercise 1.6 A Mini Inquiry Project: Cell Phone Culture

Exercise 1.7 Scenes of Writing

Using What You Have Learned

 


2. Reading as Inquiry

Purposes for Academic Reading

Exercise 2.1 U sing the Four Purposes for Academic Reading

Beliefs About Reading

Exercise 2.2 A Reader’s Memoir

One Common Belief That Is an Obstacle

Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices

Four Frames for Reading

Reading Scenarios

Scenario #1

Scenario #2

Inquiring into the Details Reading Perspectives

Exercise 2.3 Reading a Life

A Process for Reading to Write

Questions for the Process of Reading to Write

What Do I Want to Know?

What Should I Read to Find Out?

What Do I Do with What I’ve Read?

Having a Dialogue with What You Read

Inquiring into the Details Reading the Visual

Exercise 2.4 Double-Entry Journaling with a Visual Text

Techniques for Keeping a Double-Entry Journal

Exercise 2.5 Reading Creatively, Reading Critically

READING Bruce Ballenger, “The Importance of Writing Badly”

             Alternatives to the Double-Entry Journal

Wrestling with Academic Discourse: Reading from the Outside In

Features of Academic Discourse

Using What You Have Learned

 

  

3. Writing a Personal Essay

Writing About Experience and Observations

Motives for Writing a Personal Essay

The Personal Essay and Academic Writing

Inquiring into the Details The Power of Narrative Thinking

Features of the Form

Readings

Personal Essay 1 Laura Zazulak, “Every Morning for Five Years”

Inquiring into the Essay

Personal Essay 2 Ginny Blanford, “The Dog That Made Us a Family”

Inquiring into the Essay

The Writing Process

Inquiry Project: Writing a Personal Essay

Writing Beyond the Classroom Essaying “This I Believe”

What Are You Going to Write About?

Opening Up

Listing Prompts

Fastwriting Prompts

Visual Prompts

Research Prompts

Narrowing Down

What’s Promising Material and What Isn’t?

Questions About Purpose and Audience

Trying Out

Questions for Reflection

Writing the Sketch

Student Sketch  Amanda Stewart, “Earning a Sense of Place”

Moving from Sketch to Draft

Evaluating Your Own Sketch

Reflecting on What You Learned

Developing

Drafting

Methods of Development

Using Evidence

Workshopping

Questions for Readers

Reflecting on the Workshop

Revising

Shaping

Polishing

Student Essay  Seth Marlin,“Smoke of Empire”

Evaluating the Essay

Using What You Have Learned

 

 

4. Writing a Review

Writing That Evaluates

Motives for Writing a Review

The Review and Academic Writing

Seeing the Form Choosing the Best Picture

Features of the Form

Readings

Film Review Roger Ebert, “A Christmas Story”

Inquiring into the Essay

Video Game Review Seth Schiesel, “Grand Theft Auto Takes on New York”

Inquiring into the Essay

The Writing Process

Inquiry Project: Writing a Review Essay

What Are You Going to Write About?

Opening Up

Listing Prompts

Fastwriting Prompts

Visual Prompts

Research Prompts

Narrowing Down

What’s Promising Material and What Isn’t?

Questions About Audience and Purpose

Trying Out

Focusing the Category

Fastwriting

Web Research

Interviews

Experiencing Your Subject

Thinking About Criteria

Refining Criteria for Better Evidence

Considering Criteria and Rhetorical Context

Writing the Sketch

Student Sketch Laura Burns, “Recipe for a Great Film: Unlikeable People, Poor Choices, and Little Redemption”

Moving from Sketch to Draft

Evaluating Your Sketch

Reflecting on What You’ve Learned

Developing

Talking It Through

Re-Experience

Interview

Read

Drafting

Finding an Opening

Methods of Development

Using Evidence

Workshopping

Reflecting on the Draft

Revising

Shaping

Polishing

Student Essay Laura Burns, “How to Not Feel Good and Feel Good About It”

Evaluating the Essay

Using What You Have Learned

 


5. Writing a Proposal

Writing About Problems and Solutions

Problems of Consequence

Problems of Manageable Scale

Motives for Writing a Proposal

The Proposal and Academic Writing

Inquiring into the Details Writing a Research Proposal

Features of the Form

Proposal 1  Buzz Bissinger, “Why College Football Should Be Banned”

Inquiring into the Essay

Proposal 2  Robert F. Saltz, Ph. D., “Preventing Alcohol-Related Problems on College Campuses—Summary of the Final Report of the NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking”

Inquiring into the Essay

Seeing the Form  A Problem in Pictures

The Writing Process

Inquiry Project: Writing a Proposal

What Are You Going to Write About?

Opening Up

Listing Prompts

Fastwriting Prompts

Visual Prompts

Research Prompts

Narrowing Down

What’s Promising Material and What Isn’t?

Questions About Audience and Purpose

Trying Out

Researching to Answer the So What? Question

Giving Your Answer on a PowerPoint

Writing the Sketch

Student Sketch  Jenna Appleman, “Loving and Hating Reality TV”

Moving from Sketch to Draft

Evaluating Your Own Sketch

Reflecting on What You Learned

Developing

Research

Focusing on the Justifications

Drafting

Methods of Development
Using Evidence

Workshopping

Reflecting on the Draft

Revising

Shaping

Polishing

Student Essay  Jenna Appleman, “Avoidable Accidents: How to Make Reality TV Safer”

Evaluating the Essay

Using What You Have Learned

 


6. Writing an Argument

Writing to Persuade People

Motives for Writing an Argument

Writing Beyond the Classroom Public Argument in a Digital Age

The Argument and Academic Writing

Features of the Form

What Is Argument?

Argument Has More Than Two Sides

Inquiry Arguments Begin with Exploration

What Do We Mean by Claims, Reasons, and Evidence?

Claims: What You Want People to Believe

Reasons: The “Because. . .” Behind the Claim

Evidence: Testing the Claim

Seeing the Form The “Imagetext” as Argument

Analyzing What Makes a Good Argument

Classical Argument: Ethos, Pathos, Logos

Toulmin’s Approach: What Do You Need to Believe Is True?

Rogers: Accurately Restating and Refusing Opposing Claims

Exercise 6.1 Argument as Therapy

One Student’s Response Rebecca’s Journal

Avoiding Logical Fallacies

Exercise 6.2 Find the Fallacies

Readings

Factual Argument: Is it true that _____?David Leonhardt, “Is College Worth It?”

Inquiring into the Essay

Definition Argument: What should we call it?  Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, “The Language of War Is Killing”

Inquiring into the Essay

Casual Argument: What’s the cause? Kevin Sabet, “Colorado Will Show Why Legalizing Marijauna is a Mistake?”

Inquiring into the Essay

The Writing Process

Inquiry Project: Writing an Argument

What Are You Going to Write About?

Opening Up

Listing Prompts

One Student’s Response Rebecca’s Journal

Fastwriting Prompts

Visual Prompts

Research Prompts

Narrowing Down

What’s Promising Material and What Isn’t?

Questions About Audience and Purpose

Trying Out

Kitchen Knives of Thought

Research Considerations

Interviews

Writing the Sketch

Student Sketch Rebecca Thompson, “Twitter a Profound Thought?”

Moving from Sketch to Draft

Evaluating Your Own Sketch

Reflecting on What You’ve Learned

Developing

Writing for Your Readers

Researching the Argument

Drafting

Designing Your Argument Rhetorically

Methods of Development

Inquiring into the Details What Evidence Can Do

Workshopping

Reflecting on the Draft

Revising

Shaping

Polishing

Student Essay Rebecca Thompson, “Social Networking Social Good?”

Evaluating the Essay

Using What You Have Learned

 


7. Writing an Analytical Essay

Writing to Interpret

Motives for Writing an Analytical Essay

The Analytical Essay and Academic Writing

Exercise 7.1 Find Interpreting an Image

Features of the Form

Literary Analysis N. Scott Momaday, “The Shield That Came Back”

Bart Brinkman, “On ‘The Shield That Came Back’”

Inquiring into the Poem

Ad Analysis Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, “What Does Apple’s ‘Misunderstood’ Advertisement Mean?

Inquiring into the Ad

Inquiring into the Details Four Methods of Analysis

Film Analysis Bryan Bishop, “Why Won’t You Die?” The Art of the Jump Scare”

Inquiring into the Essay

The Writing ProcessInquiry Project: Writing an Analytical Essay

What Are You Going to Write About?

Opening Up

Listing Prompts

Fastwriting Prompts

Visual Prompts

Research Prompts

Inquiring into the Details Common Literary Devices

Narrowing Down

What’s Promising Material and What Isn’t?

Questions About Audience and Purpose

Writing the Sketch

Student Sketch  Hailie Johnson-Waskow, “All About That Hate”

Moving from Sketch to Draft

Evaluating Your Own Sketch

Reflecting on What You’ve Learned

Developing

Analysis

Research

Drafting

Methods of Development

Using Evidence

Workshopping

Reflecting on the Draft

Revising

Shaping

Polishing

Student Essay Hailie Johnson-Waskow, “All About That Hate: A Critical Analysis of ‘All About That Bass’”

Evaluating the Essay

Using What You Have Learned

 

 

8. Research Techniques

Methods of Collecting

Research in the Electronic Age

Research Routines

Power Searching Using Google

Google Scholar

Power Searching in the Library

Combing Terms Using Boolean Searching

Using Controlled Language Searches

Developing Working Knowledge

A Strategy for Developing Working Knowledge

Refine the Research Question

Developing Focused Knowledge

Library Research: A Strategy for Developing Focused Knowledge

Searching for Books

Searching for Periodicals and Newspapers

Web Research: A Strategy for Developing Focused Knowledge

Advanced Internet Research Techniques

Evaluating Library Sources

Inquiring into the Details The Working Bibliography

Evaluating Web Sources

An Evaluation Checklist for Web Sources

Research with Living Sources: Interviews, Surveys, and Fieldwork

Interviews

Arranging Interviews

Conducting the Interview

Using the Interview in Your Writing

The Online Interview

Finding People Online

Contacting Someone for an Online Interview

Surveys

Defining a Survey’s Goals and Audience

Two Types of Survey Questions

Crafting Survey Questions

Inquiring into the Details Types of Survey Questions

Conducting a Survey: Paper or Electronic?

Testing the Survey

Find the Target Audience

Using Survey Results in Your Writing

Fieldwork: Research on What You See and Hear

The Ethics of Fieldwork

Note-Taking Strategies

Using Field Research in Your Writing

Writing in the Middle: Note-Taking Techniques

Double-Entry Journal

Research Log

One Student’s Response Claude’s Research Log

Using What You Have Learned

 


9. Using and Citing Sources

Controlling Information

Using and Synthesizing Sources

The Research Writer as Narrator

The Narrator as Synthesizer

The Notetaker’s Triad: Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation

Summarizing

Paraphrasing

Quoting

Citing Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism

Inquiring into the Details A Taxonomy of Copying

Exercise 9.1 The Accidental Plagiarist

MLA Documentation Guidelines

Inquiring into the Details The Common Knowledge Exception

Citing Sources

Where to Put Citations

Inquiring into the Details Citations That Go with the Flow

When You Mention the Author’s Name

When There Is No Author

Works by the Same Author

When One Source Quotes Another

Personal Interviews

Several Sources in a Single Citation

Sample Parenthetical References for Other Sources

An Entire Work

A Volume of a Multivolume Work

A Literary Work

An Online Source

Format

The Layout

Preparing the Works Cited Page

Format

Citing Books

Sample Book Citations

Citing Periodicals

Sample Periodical Citations

Citing Online and Other Sources

A Sample Paper in MLA Style

MLA Versus APA: Some Basic Differences

APA Documentation Guidelines

How the Essay Should Look

Page Format

Title Page

Abstract

Body of the Paper

References Page

Appendix

Notes

Tables and Figures

Language and Style

Citing Sources in Your Essay

When the Author Is Mentioned in the Text

When the Author Isn’t Mentioned in the Text

When to Cite Page Numbers

A Single Work by Two or More Authors

A Work with No Author

Two or More Works by the Same Author

An Institutional Author

Multiple Works in the Same Parentheses

Interviews, E-Mail, and Letters

New Editions of Old Works

A Website

Preparing the References List

Order of Sources

Order of Information

Sample References: Articles

Sample References: Books

Sample References: Other

A Sample Paper in APA Style

Using What You Have Learned

 

 

10. Re-Genre: Repurposing Your Writing for Multimedia Genres

What Writers Can Learn from Re-Genre: Knowledge Transfer

Transfer from Blog Essay to Podcast: A Case Study

Beyond Words: Communicating in Other Modes

The Problem of Definition

Re-Genre is Deep Re-Vision

Genre as a Way of Knowing and Seeing

Genre and Its Conventions

Inquiring into the Details Re-Genre and Re-Flect

Re-Genre: The Assignment

Planning the Re-Genre

Applying Rhetorical Goals

Inquiring into the Details Levels of Content

Exercise 10.1 Re-Genre Pitch

Exercise 10.2 Genre Analysis: Conventions and Best Practices

Analyzing Your Examples

Reflecting on Re-Genre

Using What You Have Learned

 


11. Revision Strategies

Why Revise?

Divorcing the Draft

Strategies for Divorcing the Draft

Five Categories of Revision

Problems with Purpose

Revision Strategy 11.1: Dialogue with Dave

Revision Strategy 11.2: What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?

One Student’s Response Julia’s Draft

Revision Strategy 11.3: Finding the Focusing Question

Revision Strategy 11.4: What’s the Relationship?

Problems with Meaning

Where Does Meaning Come From?

Methods for Discovering Your Thesis

Revision Strategy 11.5: Harvest Meanings in the Draft

Revision Strategy 11.6: Looping Toward a Thesis

Revision Strategy 11.7: Reclaiming Your Topic

Revision Strategy 11.8: The Believing Game

Methods for Refining Your Thesis

Revision Strategy 11.9: Questions as Knives

Revision Strategy 11.10: Qualifying Your Claim

Problems with Information

Revision Strategy 11.11: Explode a Moment

Revision Strategy 11.12: Beyond Examples

Revision Strategy 11.13: Research the Conversation

Revision Strategy 11.14: Backing Up Your Assumptions

Problems with Structure

Formal Academic Structures

Revision Strategy 11.15: Beginnings, Middles, Ends, and the Work They Do

Revision Strategy 11.16: Reorganizing Around Thesis and Support

Revision Strategy 11.17: Multiple Leads

Revision Strategy 11.18: The Frankenstein Draft

Revision Strategy 11.19: Reverse Outline

Problems with Clarity and Style

Solving Problems of Clarity

Revision Strategy 11.20: The Three Most Important Sentences

The First Sentence

The Last Line of the First Paragraph

The Last Line of the Essay

Revision Strategy 11.21: Untangling Paragraphs

Revision Strategy 11.22: Cutting Clutter

Inquiring into the Details Transition Flags

Revision Strategy 11.23: The Actor and the Action Next Door

Improving Style

Revision Strategy 11.24: Actors and Actions

Revision Strategy 11.25: Smoothing the Choppiness

Revision Strategy 11.26: Fresh Ways to Say Things 

Using What You Have Learned

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