9780060766627

The Dead Sea Scrolls: A New Translation

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780060766627

  • ISBN10:

    006076662X

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 6/2/2010
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publications

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $59!
    Your order must be $59 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $26.99 Save up to $14.95
  • Rent Book $17.54
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Used and Rental copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

A fully revised and updated edition of our translation of the complete Dead Sea Scrolls, making it the definitive translation of the Scrolls in English. With new texts, updated introductions, a glossary of terms, and other new additions, this will become the definitive translation of the Scrolls, and the lead companion to our other Dead Sea Scrolls Guides: The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Dead Sea Scrolls Bible .

Author Biography

Michael Wise, Scholar in Residence and professor of Hebrew Bible at Northwestern College, St. Paul, Minn. Martin Abegg Jr. is codirector of the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute and director of the M.A. in Biblical Studies program at Trinity Western University Edward Cook, a specialist in ancient Hebrew and Aramaic, lives in Cincinnati, Ohio

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Preface to the Revised Edition xv
I. PROLEGOMENA
Introduction
3(33)
A Dead Sea Scrolls Timeline
36(2)
Reading a Dead Sea Scroll
38(6)
How to Read This Book
44(5)
II. TEXTS
1. The Damascus Document (CD) (Geniza A+B, 4Q266-272)
49(30)
2. A Commentary on Habakkuk (1QpHab)
79(9)
3. A Commentary on Micah (1Q14)
88(1)
4. Tales of the Patriarchs (1QapGen)
89(16)
5. The Words of Moses (1Q22)
105(3)
6. The Book of Secrets (1Q27, 4Q299-301)
108(4)
7. Charter of a Jewish Sectarian Association (1QS, 4Q255-264a, 5Q11)
112(24)
8. Charter for Israel in the Last Days (1QSa [1Q28a] 4Q249ai)
136(4)
9. Priestly Blessings for the Last Days ([1QSb], 1Q28b)
140(4)
10. Tongues of Fire and Prayer of Praise (1Q29, 4Q376, 4Q408)
144(2)
11. The War Scroll (1QM, 4Q491-496)
146(24)
12. Thanksgiving Hymns (The Thanksgiving Scroll) (1QHa, 1Q35, 4Q427-432)
170(35)
13. Festival Prayers (1Q34, 1Q34bis, 4Q507-509)
205(4)
14. A Story About the Exodus (2Q21)
209(1)
15. The Last Words of Judah (3Q7)
210(1)
16. A List of Buried Treasure (The Copper Scroll) (3Q15)
211(12)
17. Apocryphal Psalms (4Q88)
223(1)
18. A Reworking of Genesis and Exodus (4Q158)
224(6)
19. Ordinances (4Q159, 4Q513-514)
230(4)
20. An Account of the Story of Samuel (4Q160)
234(2)
21. Commentaries on Isaiah (4Q161-165)
236(5)
22. A Commentary on Hosea (4Q166-167)
241(2)
23. A Commentary on Nahum (4Q169)
243(5)
24. Commentaries on Psalms (4Q171, 4Q173, 1Q16)
248(6)
25. The Last Days: A Commentary on Selected Verses (4Q174)
254(4)
26. A Collection of Messianic Proof Texts (4Q175)
258(3)
27. A Commentary on Consoling Passages in Scripture (4Q176)
261(2)
28. The Last Days: An Interpretation of Selected Verses (4Q177)
263(4)
29. A Lament for Zion (4Q179)
267(2)
30. The Ages of the World (4Q180-181)
269(2)
31. A Commentary on Collected Verses (4Q182)
271(1)
32. A Sectarian History (4Q183)
271(1)
33. Wiles of the Wicked Woman (4Q184)
272(2)
34. In Praise of Wisdom (4Q185)
274(1)
35. A Horoscope Written in Code (4Q186)
275(3)
Introduction to the Enoch Literature
278(101)
36. The Book of Enoch (4Q201-202, 4Q204-207, 4Q212, 1Q19)
280(10)
37. The Book of Giants (4Q203, 4Q530-532, 6Q8, 1Q23, 2Q26)
290(5)
38. Astronomical Enoch (4Q208-211)
295(9)
39. The Words of Levi (4Q213, 4Q213ab, 4Q214, 4Q214ab, 4Q540-541, 1Q21, Geniza Fragments, Mt. Athos Greek Text)
304(10)
40. The Last Words of Naphtali (4Q215)
314(1)
41. The Time of Righteousness (4Q215a)
315(1)
42. The Book of Jubilees (1Q17-18, 2Q19-20, 3Q5, 4Q176b, 4Q216-224, 11Q12)
316(20)
43. A Paraphrase of Genesis and Exodus (4Q225)
336(2)
44. Israel and the Holy Land (4Q226)
338(1)
45. Enoch and the Watchers (4Q227)
339(1)
46. Work with a Citation of Jubilees (4Q228)
340(1)
47. The Healing of King Nabonidus (4Q242)
340(2)
48. The Vision of Daniel (4Q243-244)
342(2)
49. A Second Vision of Daniel (4Q245)
344(2)
50. A Vision of the Son of God (4Q246)
346(1)
51. The Acts of a King (4Q248)
347(1)
52. A Commentary on the Law of Moses (4Q251)
348(4)
53. Commentaries on Genesis (4Q252-254a)
352(5)
54. A Commentary on Malachi (4Q253a)
357(1)
55. Portions of Sectarian Law (4Q265)
357(3)
56. Ritual Purity Laws Concerning Liquids (4Q274)
360(3)
57. Rule of Initiation (4Q275)
363(1)
58. The Ashes of the Red Heifer (4Q276-277)
363(2)
59. Ritual Purity Laws Concerning Menstruation (4Q278)
365(1)
60. Laws Concerning Lots (4Q279)
365(1)
61. Ritual of Purification for Festival Days (4Q284)
366(1)
62. Laws About Liquids and Gleaning (4Q284a)
367(1)
63. The War of the Messiah (4Q285, 11Q14)
368(3)
64. A Liturgy of Blessing and Cursing (4Q280, 4Q286-289)
371(4)
65. The Sage to the "Children of Dawn" (4Q298)
375(2)
66. The Parable of the Bountiful Tree (4Q302)
377(1)
67. A Meditation on Creation (4Q303)
378(1)
68. The People Who Err (4Q306)
379(1)
A Reader's Guide to the Qumran Calendar Texts
379(75)
69. The Phases of the Moon (4Q317)
385(2)
70. A Divination Text (Brontologion) (4Q318)
387(2)
71. Calendar of the Heavenly Signs (4Q319)
389(4)
72. Synchronistic Calendars (4Q320-4Q321a)
393(5)
73. Priestly Service: Sabbath Entrance (4Q322-324a)
398(1)
74. Fragmentary Historical Writings (4Q322a, 4Q331-333, 4Q468e, 4Q578)
399(4)
75. Priestly Service: Sabbath, Month, and Festival-Year One (4Q325)
403(1)
76. Priestly Service: Sabbath, Month, and Festival-Year Four (4Q326)
404(1)
77. Priestly Service as the Seasons Change (4Q328)
405(1)
78. Priestly Rotation on the Sabbath (4Q329)
406(1)
79. Priestly Service on the Passover (4Q329a)
407(1)
80. Priestly Service on New Year's Day (4Q330)
407(1)
81. A Liturgical Calendar (4Q334)
408(1)
82. False Prophets in Israel (4Q339)
409(2)
83. A List of Temple Servants (4Q340)
411(1)
84. An Annotated Law of Moses (4Q364-365)
412(3)
85. An Apocryphal Law of Moses (4Q368)
415(1)
86. The Inheritance of the Firstborn, the Messiah of David (4Q369)
416(2)
87. A Sermon on the Flood (4Q370)
418(2)
88. Stories About the Tribes of Israel (2Q22, 4Q371-373)
420(4)
89. A Discourse on the Exodus and Conquest (4Q374)
424(1)
90. The Test of a True Prophet (4Q375)
425(2)
91. A Moses Apocryphon (4Q377)
427(1)
92. Apocryphal Joshua (4Q378-379)
428(4)
93. A Collection of Royal Psalms (4Q380-381)
432(5)
94. An Apocryphon of Elijah (4Q382)
437(2)
95. A Jeremiah Apocryphon (4Q384, 4Q385a, 4Q387, 4Q388a, 4Q389-390)
439(8)
96. An Ezekiel Apocryphon (4Q385, 4Q385b, 4Q386, 4Q388)
447(3)
97. God the Creator (4Q392)
450(1)
98. Prayers for Forgiveness (4Q393)
451(1)
99. The Sabbaths and Festivals of the Year (4Q394 Section A)
452(2)
100. A Sectarian Manifesto (4QMMT: 4Q394-399)
454(8)
101. The Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice (4Q400-407, 11Q17, Mas1k)
462(14)
102. A Liturgy (4Q409)
476(1)
103. An Unknown Prophecy (4Q410)
477(1)
104. A Liturgy of Ritual Washings (4Q414, 4Q512)
477(4)
105. The Secret of the Way Things Are (4Q415-418, 1Q26, 4Q423)
481(13)
106. An Instruction (4Q419)
494(1)
107. A Commentary on Genesis and Exodus (4Q422)
495(2)
108. A Collection of Proverbs (4Q424)
497(2)
109. Thanksgivings (4Q433a)
499(1)
110. In Praise of God's Grace (Barki Nafshi) (4Q434, 4Q436-437, 4Q439)
500(4)
111. A Meditation on the Fourth Day of Creation (4Q440)
504(1)
112. Hymns of Thanksgiving (4Q443)
504(1)
113. Incantation of the Sage (4Q444)
505(1)
114. In Praise of King Jonathan (4Q448)
506(1)
115. A Fragmentary Narrative (4Q458)
507(1)
116. Fragment of a Lost Apocryphon (4Q460)
508(1)
117. Fragment of a Lost Narrative (4Q461)
509(1)
118. A Meditation on Israel's History (4Q462)
510(2)
119. Lives of the Patriarchs (4Q464)
512(1)
120. The Archangel Michael and King Zedekiah (4Q470)
513(1)
121. Assorted Manuscripts (4Q471-471a, 4Q471c)
514(1)
122. The Two Ways (4Q473)
515(1)
123. A Record of Disciplinary Action (4Q477)
516(1)
124. A Prayer for Deliverance (4Q501)
517(1)
125. A Liturgy of Thanksgiving (4Q502)
518(2)
126. Daily Prayers (4Q503)
520(2)
127. The Words of the Heavenly Lights (4Q504-506)
522(4)
128. The Songs of the Sage for Protection Against Evil Spirits (4Q510-511)
526(4)
129. Redemption and Resurrection (4Q521)
530(2)
130. A Tale of Joshua (4Q522)
532(1)
131. The Blessings of the Wise (4Q525)
533(5)
132. The Words of the Archangel Michael (4Q529)
538(1)
133. The Birth of the Chosen One (4Q534-536)
539(2)
134. The Vision of Jacob (4Q537)
541(2)
135. An Apocryphon of Judah (4Q538)
543(1)
136. The Last Words of Joseph (4Q539)
544(1)
137. The Last Words of Kohath (4Q542)
545(2)
138. The Vision of Amram (4Q543-548)
547(4)
139. Hur and Miriam (4Q549)
551(1)
140. The Tale of Patireza and Bagasraw (4Q550, 4Q550ad)
552(2)
141. Aramaic Fragments (4Q551, 4Q569)
554(1)
142. The Vision of the Four Trees (4Q552-553)
555(2)
143. A Vision of the New Jerusalem (4Q554-555, 5Q15, 11Q18, 1Q32, 2Q24)
557(6)
144. A Text About the Maccabees? (4Q556)
563(1)
145. A Biblical Chronology (4Q559)
564(2)
146. An Exorcism (4Q560)
566(1)
147. An Aramaic Horoscope (4Q561)
567(2)
148. An Aramaic Text on the Persian Period (4Q562)
569(1)
149. A Priestly Vision (4Q563)
570(1)
150. A Sectarian Rule (5Q13)
570(1)
151. Apocryphal Psalms of David (11Q5-6, 4Q88, 4Q448)
571(6)
152. An Aramaic Translation of the Book of Job (11 Q10)
577(11)
153. Songs to Disperse Demons (11Q11)
588(2)
154. The Coming of Melchizedek (11Q13)
590(3)
155. The Temple Scroll (11Q19-21, 4Q524, 4Q365a)
593(42)
III. INDICES
Bibliography
635(12)
Index of Manuscripts
647(4)
Index of References
651

Excerpts

The Dead Sea Scrolls - Revised Edition
A New Translation

Chapter One

Reading a Dead Sea Scroll

In order to read a Dead Sea Scroll with proper appreciation and a modicum of critical acumen, it's important to know what you are reading. That may seem trite, but it's true. How does one go from a hugger-mugger of over 15,000 tiny scraps of skin and ink to about 900 full-blown manuscripts, and from there to published texts and translations? You should have some idea of the various steps involved in the process. Only then can you begin to think for yourself about what you will be reading in the following pages. Understanding the process by which the scrolls have been put together will help you to avoid the reader's cardinal sin -- trusting an author too much. If we have certain ideas to present, we want you to be persuaded, not simply take our word for it. We want you to know just how much reconstructing the scrolls can be a matter of judgment (possibly mistaken) and uncertainty. We also want you to be able to make sense of the various sigla, brackets, and other paraphernalia that decorate the translations in this book.

As noted in the Introduction, the first seven Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered more or less intact. That can be said of very few of the hundreds of works that came to light subsequently. The early members of the scrolls editorial team found themselves facing an enormously complex jigsaw puzzle. After a short time, they worked out a modus operandi. Thousands of fragments were spread out on the tables of the Palestine Archaeological Museum, flattened under glass. The editors would walk from table to table, scrutinizing the fragments and trying to match them with this or that grouping they had already isolated. One of the editors, John Allegro, has described the guiding principle of those early efforts:

One of the saving factors has been that of the four hundred [later, eight hundred] or so manuscripts we have had to deal with, surprisingly few were written by the same scribe, so that by recognizing the idiosyncrasies of one's own scribes one could be fairly sure that the piece belonged to his document.

Handwriting was thus the foremost criterion that the editors used to separate fragments into piles and then into manuscripts. A second important guide was the skin on which the texts were inscribed. The treated hides of goats, ibex, and even gazelle used for the scrolls are not uniform in thickness or color. Each skin is, so to speak, its own animal: one might be thick, another thin; one might have a reddish cast, another could be nearly black. Study of the differences in the skins was therefore important for figuring out how to group fragments. But the skins could sometimes be misleading. Though they might have been uniform shortly after they were first placed in the caves, when they came out of the caves as manuscript fragments, they could differ markedly in appearance. The reason: the variable conditions in which they had spent the past two millennia. Some fragments were exposed to more light than others, some to more moisture or a different soil chemistry. Still, in general, handwriting and the appearance of the skins were reasonably trustworthy as dual criteria guiding the early work of separating out scrolls. For the hundred or so texts written not on skin, but on papyrus, scrutiny of the patterns of the plant fibers in the papyrus helped in the separating.

Work on proper identification of the fragments continues to this day. Although the early editors did their work of sorting admirably well, they were not infallible. Sometimes they made mistakes; in fact, we suggest a few that we think we've caught in the pages that follow (for example, see Assorted Manuscripts, text 121). Scholars continue to assess older conclusions. Advancing technology holds the promise of new approaches, although, since in most cases there is little doubt about the sorting, help will come mostly "at the margins." In this vein, researchers at Brigham Young University have recently begun to extract DNA from some of the fragments. Extraction does minimal damage to the materials, and DNA analysis makes it possible to identify the individual animal from which each fragment came. Where there is some question about a given fragment, or where fragments have never been assigned to any manuscript (there is a fairly sizable group of such pieces, all extremely tiny), this new approach may accomplish a modest breakthrough.

Once the early editors had grouped the fragments of a given manuscript together on one or more plates, they had photographs taken. Also, each manuscript was assigned a "Q-number," indicating which cave it had come from. For example, 4Q242 means Cave 4 of Q(umran), the 242nd manuscript from that cave. (This system did not yet exist when the first seven scrolls were discovered, so they have no number. They are designated by abbreviations of their names; e.g., 1QS means: Cave 1 of Q(umran), Serek [Hebrew for "order"].) As work progressed and new fragments were identified, or it became clear that questionable assignments were in fact mistaken and fragments were removed, the shape of a given manuscript changed, and new photographs were taken. Today we can study the entire sequence of photographs for each manuscript. For the most part, these photographs were taken under infrared light. Time had so blackened many of the fragments that the writing on them was nearly invisible to the naked eye. Infrared photography rendered the invisible visible. The use of infrared explains why you seldom see color photographs of the more fragmentary manuscripts; in the 1950s, color infrared photography was not yet possible (now it is).

Because these photographs were usually so much more legible than the manuscripts themselves, the early editors worked mostly with the photographs, and subsequent scholars have continued this practice. Autopsy of the original manuscript is still important, for it can resolve uncertainties (is this odd mark ink or just a spot on the skin?), but research on . . .

The Dead Sea Scrolls - Revised Edition
A New Translation
. Copyright © by Michael Wise. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Excerpted from Dead Sea Scrolls: A New Translation by Michael Wise, Martin Abegg, Edward M. Cook
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Rewards Program

Customer Reviews

The Sea may be Dead but not so the Scrolls. August 10, 2011
by
Gives a very good understanding of the life, thinking, and lifestyle of those who lived in Judea. This textbook and others such as 'The Dead Sea Scrolls Deception' makes it clear that modern Christianity, Judaism, and all our calendars(except the one given to Enoch) are pagan. Great care was taken in packaging and shipping this textbook. I received the textbook in a very short time. I feel ecampus cares about the books and his clients.
Flag Review
Please provide a brief explanation for why you are flagging this review:
Submit
Your submission has been received. We will inspect this review as soon as possible. Thank you for your input!
The Dead Sea Scrolls: A New Translation: 5 out of 5 stars based on 1 user reviews.

Write a Review