CART

(0) items

Death, Society, and Human Experience,9780205482627
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Death, Society, and Human Experience

by
Edition:
10th
ISBN13:

9780205482627

ISBN10:
0205482627
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $102.40
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $13.64
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Death, Society and Human Experience
    Death, Society and Human Experience
  • Death, Society and Human Experience Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
    Death, Society and Human Experience Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
  • Death, Society, and Human Experience
    Death, Society, and Human Experience
  • Death, Society, and Human Experience
    Death, Society, and Human Experience
  • Death, Society, and Human Experience
    Death, Society, and Human Experience
  • Death, Society, and Human Experience
    Death, Society, and Human Experience




Summary

"This landmark text in death education draws on contributions from the social and behavioral sciences as well as the humanities, such as history, religion, philosophy, literature, and the arts, to provide thorough coverage of understanding death and the dying process. "The text focuses on both individual and societal attitudes and how they influence both how and when we die and how we live and deal with the knowledge of death and loss. Robert Kastenbaum is a renowned scholar in the field who developed one of the world's first death education courses and introduced the first text for this market.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
As We Think About Death
3(28)
Not Thinking About Death: A Failed Experiment
5(2)
Listening and Communicating
6(1)
Your Self-Inventory of Attitudes, Beliefs, and Feelings
7(5)
Some Answers---And the Questions They Raise
12(3)
Knowledge Base
12(1)
Attitudes, Experiences, Beliefs, Feelings
12(2)
How Does State of Mind Affect Death-Related Behavior?
14(1)
Man Is Mortal: But What Does That Have to Do With Me?
15(1)
Anxiety, Denial, and Acceptance: Three Core Concepts
16(1)
Theories and Studies of Death Anxiety
16(1)
Major Findings from Self-Reports of Death Anxiety
17(3)
How Much Do We Fear Death?
17(1)
Are There Gender Differences in Death Anxiety?
17(1)
Are There Age Differences in Death Anxiety?
17(1)
Is Death Anxiety Related to Mental Health and Illness?
18(1)
Does Religious Belief Lower or Raise Death Anxiety?
18(1)
Situational Death Anxiety
19(1)
Theoretical Perspectives on Death Anxiety
20(2)
Early Psychoanalytic Theory
20(1)
The Existential Challenge
20(1)
Edge Theory
21(1)
Accepting and Denying Death
22(5)
Types and Contexts of Acceptance and Denial
22(2)
The Interpersonal Side of Acceptance and Denial
24(1)
Anxiety, Denial, and Acceptance: How Should We Respond?
25(1)
In the Shade of the Jambu Tree
26(1)
Summary
27(4)
What is Death?
31(36)
What Does Death Mean?
Competing Ideas About the Nature and Meaning of Death
33(1)
Death as Observed, Proclaimed, and Imagined
34(5)
Death as Symbolic Construction
37(2)
Biomedical Approaches to the Definition of Death
39(5)
Traditional Determination of Death
39(1)
Ways of Being Dead
40(2)
Brain Death and the Harvard Criteria
42(1)
The Harvard Criteria
42(1)
The Current Scene
43(1)
Event Versus State
44(1)
What Does Death Mean?
44(1)
Interpretations of the Death State
45(5)
Enfeebled Life
45(1)
Continuation
45(1)
Perpetual Development
45(1)
Waiting
46(1)
Cycling and Recycling
47(1)
Nothing
48(1)
Virtual, Therefore Not Death
48(1)
Implications of the Ways in Which We Interpret Death
49(1)
Conditions That Resemble Death
50(3)
Inorganic and Unresponsive
50(1)
Sleep and Altered States of Consciousness
51(1)
Beings Who Resemble or Represent Death
52(1)
Death as a Person
53(3)
How We Personify Death: The First Study
54(1)
The Follow-Up Study
55(1)
Conditions that Death Resembles
56(2)
Social Death
56(1)
Phenomenological Death
57(1)
Death as an Agent of Personal, Political, and Social Change
58(4)
The Great Leveler
58(1)
The Great Validator
59(1)
Death Unites/Separates
59(2)
The Ultimate Problem or the Ultimate Solution?
61(1)
The Ultimate Meaningless Event
61(1)
Summary
62(5)
The Death System
67(40)
A World Without Death
72(2)
General Consequences
72(1)
Personal Consequences
73(1)
Basic Characteristics of the Death System
74(1)
Components of the Death System
75(4)
People
75(1)
Places
76(1)
Times
77(1)
Objects
78(1)
Symbols
78(1)
Functions of the Death System
79(11)
Warnings and Predictions
79(1)
Preventing Death
80(1)
Caring for the Dying
80(1)
Disposing of the Dead
81(1)
Social Consolidation After Death
82(1)
Making Sense of Death
83(2)
Killing
85(2)
War as a Function of Society
87(1)
A Deadly Species
87(2)
Sacrifice: Killing for Life
89(1)
Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina---Challenges to the Death System
90(2)
Tsunami: A Stealth Wave and Its Impact
90(2)
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
92(3)
The Katrina Timeline
92(1)
Hurricane Katrina and the Death System
93(2)
How Our Death System Has Been Changing---and the ``Deathniks'' Who are Making a Difference
95(2)
Changing Ways of Life, Changing Ways of Death
95(1)
The Beginnings of Death Education, Research, and Counseling
96(1)
Causes of Death: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
97(1)
Basic Terms and Concepts
98(4)
Leading Causes of Death in the United States Today
99(1)
What Will Be the Cause of My Death?
100(1)
Causes of Death in the Future?
101(1)
Summary
102(5)
Dying
107(40)
Transition from Life
The Moment of Death: Is It Vanishing?
108(3)
The Slipping Away
109(1)
Dying as Transition
110(1)
What is Dying, and When Does it Begin?
111(6)
Individual and Interpersonal Responses
111(2)
Onset of the Dying Process: Alternative Perspectives
113(4)
Trajectories of Dying: From Beginning to End
117(6)
Certainty and Time
117(1)
The Lingering Trajectory
118(1)
The Expected Quick Trajectory
119(1)
The Unexpected Quick Trajectory
120(1)
Life-or-Death Emergencies
121(2)
Healthy People Who are at Risk: Hemophilia
123(1)
Guarded Feelings, Subtle Communications
124(6)
Difficulties in Communication
124(2)
Doctor-Patient Communication: The Support Study
126(1)
Improving Communication
127(3)
Individuality and Universality in the Experience of Dying
130(3)
Factors that Influence the Experience of Dying
130(2)
Where and How We Die---From the Abstract to the Particular
132(1)
Theoretical Models of the Dying Process
133(8)
Do We Die in States?
133(3)
A Developmental Coping Model of the Dying Process
136(1)
The Dying Person's Own Reality as the Model
136(1)
A Multiple Perspective Approach
137(3)
Your Deathbed Scene
140(1)
Improving End-of-Life Care
140(1)
Summary
141(6)
Hospice and Palliative Care
147(28)
Outside Mainstream Society
149(2)
Hospice: A Flowering from Ancient Roots
151(3)
Standards of Care for the Terminally Ill
154(2)
Hidden or Implicit Standards of Care
154(1)
Proposed Standards Recommended by the International Task Force
155(1)
Establishment of Hospice Programs in the United States
156(1)
The Hospice in Action
157(6)
Entering St. Christopher's
157(1)
Mother's Last Moments: A Daughter's Experience
158(1)
Dying from Two Worlds
159(1)
Adult Respite Care
159(1)
Hospice-Inspired Care for Children
160(1)
Hospice Care for People with AIDS
161(1)
Hospice Care on the International Scene
162(1)
Relief of Pain and Suffering
163(4)
Why Pain Must Be Controlled
163(2)
Other Symptoms and Problems
165(2)
Your Deathbed Scene, Revisited
167(1)
Hospice Access, Decision Making, and Challenges
167(2)
Dame Cicely Saunders' Reflections on Hospice
169(2)
Summary
171(4)
End of Life Issues and Decisions
175(20)
From Description to Decision Making
176(1)
Who Should Participate in End-of-Life Decisions?
176(2)
The Living will and Its Impact
178(1)
Right-to-Die Decisions that We Can Make
179(5)
From Living Will to Patient Self-Determination Act
180(2)
College Students' Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Issues
182(1)
Advance Medical Directives: What Should We Do?
183(1)
A Right Not to Die? The Cryonics Alternative
184(3)
Historical Background
184(1)
Rationale and Method
185(1)
Heads of Stone: A Radical New Development
186(1)
More Questions
187(1)
Organ Donation
187(1)
Funeral-Related Decisions
188(3)
A Perspective on End-of-Life Decisions
190(1)
Summary
191(4)
Suicide
195(38)
What Do the Statistics Tell Us?
199(3)
Suicide Patterns in the United States
200(2)
What About Suicide Attempts?
202(1)
The Human Side
202(1)
Four Problem Areas
202(12)
Youth Suicide
202(4)
Do Children Commit Suicide?
206(1)
Suicide Among Elderly Persons
207(1)
The Lethality of Suicide Attempts in Later Adult Years
208(1)
Preventing Suicide in Later Adult Years
208(1)
Suicide Among Ethnic and Racial Minorities
209(2)
Suicide Risk for War Combatants and Veterans
211(1)
High-Risk Situations for Suicide
212(1)
Gender and Suicide
213(1)
Balancing Individual and Cultural Influences on Suicide
214(1)
Some Cultural Meanings of Suicide
214(4)
Suicide as Sinful
214(2)
Suicide as Criminal
216(1)
Suicide as Weakness or Madness
216(1)
Suicide as ``The Great Death''
217(1)
Suicide as a Rational Alternative
217(1)
A Powerful Sociological Theory of Suicide
218(1)
The Importance of Social Integration
218(1)
Four Types of Suicide
219(1)
Some Individual Meanings of Suicide
219(5)
Suicide for Reunion
220(1)
Suicide for Rest and Refuge
220(1)
Suicide for Revenge
220(1)
Suicide as the Penalty for Failure
221(1)
Suicide as a Mistake
222(1)
A Psychoanalytical Approach to Suicide
223(1)
The Descent Toward Suicide
223(1)
Facts, Myths, and Guidelines
224(1)
Popular Myths about Suicide
224(1)
Suicide Prevention
225(3)
Individual Guidelines to Suicide Prevention
225(1)
Systematic Approaches to Suicide Prevention
226(1)
Three Emerging Challenges
227(1)
Summary
228(5)
Violent Death: Murder, Terrorism, Genocide, Disaster, and Accident
233(34)
Murder
236(10)
Murder: The Statistical Picture
236(1)
Patterns of Murder in the United States
237(3)
Young Men with Guns
240(1)
School Shootings
241(1)
Mass and Serial Killers: Who Are They and Why Do They Do It?
242(2)
Political Murder: Assassination in the United States
244(2)
Terrorism
246(7)
Terrorism in History
246(4)
Twentieth Century Terrorism and Genocide
250(3)
Twenty-First Century Terrorism and Genocide
253(5)
World Trade Center Attacks
253(1)
Immediate Responses to the Loss and Trauma
254(1)
Later Responses
255(2)
The Darfur Genocide
257(1)
Accident and Disaster
258(4)
Accidents
259(3)
Natural Disasters
262(1)
Summary
262(5)
Euthanasia, Assisted Death, Abortion, and the Right to Die
267(38)
``I Swear by Apollo the Physician'': What Happened to the Hippocratic Oath?
271(1)
Key Terms and Concepts
272(5)
Nazi ``Euthanasia''
274(1)
The Black Stork
274(2)
The Ventilator and the Slippery Slope
276(1)
Our Changing Attitudes Towards a Right to Die
277(2)
The Right-to-Die Dilemma: Case Examples
279(6)
The Ethics of Withdrawing Treatment: The Landmark Quinlan Case
279(2)
``It's over, Debbie'': Compassion or Murder?
281(1)
An Arrow Through the Physician's Armor
282(1)
A Supreme Court Ruling: The Nancy Cruzan Case
283(2)
Terri Schiavo: Who Decides?
285(4)
The Ordeal Begins
285(1)
Comments I
286(1)
The Public Controversy
287(2)
Comments II
289(1)
Dr. Kevorkian and the Assisted-Suicide Movement
289(6)
Assisted Death in the Kevorkian Manner
290(1)
Kevorkian's Agenda
290(1)
Kevorkian's Method
291(1)
Evaluating Kevorkian's Approach
291(2)
The Netherlands: A Social Experiment Watched Closely by the World
293(2)
Australia: Yes, and Then No
295(1)
Assisted Death in the United States
295(3)
Compassion and Choices
295(1)
The Oregon Death Dignity Act
296(2)
Abortion
298(2)
Basic Facts about Abortion
298(1)
Difficult Issues and Questions
299(1)
Summary
300(5)
Death in the World of Childhood
305(40)
Respecting the Child's Concern and Curiosity
306(2)
Adult Assumptions About Children and Death
308(1)
Children Do Think About Death
309(12)
Early Experiences with Death in Childhood
309(3)
Death in the Songs and Games of Childhood
312(1)
Research and Clinical Evidence
313(1)
Research Case Histories
314(4)
Reflections and Questions
318(3)
Concepts of Death: Developing Through Experience
321(6)
``Auntie Death's'' Pioneering Study
321(2)
Evaluating Nagy's Contributions
323(1)
Are Concepts of Death Related to Cognitive Level, Gender, and Social Class?
323(1)
Does Anxiety Influence Children's Thoughts About Death?
323(1)
Cultural Influences on Children's Concepts of Death
324(1)
Do Imaginary Friends Die?
325(2)
How Do Children Cope with Bereavement?
327(6)
A Death in the Family: Effects on the Child
327(2)
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Following a Violent Death
329(1)
Long-Term Effects of Childhood Bereavement
330(1)
Helping Children Cope with Bereavement
331(2)
The Dying Child
333(5)
Care of the Dying Child
335(1)
Siblings of the Dying Child
336(1)
The Stress of Working with Dying Children
337(1)
Sharing the Child's Death Concerns: A Few Guidelines
338(1)
The ``Right'' to Decide: Should the Child's Voice be Heard?
339(1)
Summary
340(5)
Bereavement, Grief, and Mourning
345(42)
Some Responses to Loss
346(2)
Defining Our Terms: Bereavement, Grief, Mourning
348(8)
Bereavement: An Objective Fact
348(1)
Grief: A Painful Response
348(3)
Mourning: A Signal of Distress
351(5)
Theoretical Perspectives on Grief
356(1)
Types of Grief
356(3)
Normal and Complicated Grief
356(1)
Anticipatory Grief
357(1)
Resolved and Unresolved Grief
357(1)
Hidden and Disenfranchised Grief
358(1)
Theories of Grief
359(5)
The Grief-Work Theory
359(3)
Other Theoretical Approaches to Understanding Grief
362(2)
How Do People Recover From Grief?
364(8)
When a Husband or Wife Dies
364(6)
The Family That Has Lost a Child
370(2)
Bereavement in Later Life
372(2)
Sorrow upon Sorrow, Loss upon Loss
373(1)
Are Bereaved People at Higher Risk for Death?
374(1)
Differential Mortality Risk: The Statistical Pattern
374(1)
Who is Most at Risk?
374(1)
What are the Leading Causes of Death Among the Bereaved?
374(1)
How Well Do We Support the Bereaved?
374(2)
American Society's Discomfort with Grief and Mourning
375(1)
Meaningful Help for Bereaved People
376(3)
Widow to Widow: The Phyllis Silverman Interview
376(2)
Helpful and Unhelpful Responses to the Bereaved Person
378(1)
Professional Help: When Is It Needed?
378(1)
Widows in Third World Nations
379(1)
Summary
380(7)
The Funeral Process
387(42)
A Sampler of Responses to the Dead
388(3)
What Do Funerals Mean to Us?
391(2)
From Dead Body to Living Memory: A Process Approach
393(8)
Common Elements of the Funeral Process
393(6)
The Funeral Service
399(1)
Memorializing the Deceased
400(1)
Getting on with Life
400(1)
Making Death ``Legal''
401(1)
Establishing the Facts of Death
401(1)
What Does the Funeral Process Accomplish?
402(6)
When Great People Die
402(4)
Balancing the Claims of the Living and the Dead
406(2)
Memories of Our People: Cemeteries in the United States
408(4)
The Neighborhood Cemetery
409(1)
Ethnic Cemeteries in the United States
409(3)
The Place of the Dead in Society: Yesterday and Today
412(6)
When are the Dead Important to the Living?
412(2)
American Memory and the Casualties of War and Terrorism
414(2)
Who ``Owns'' Human Remains?
416(1)
``You Were the Best Dog Ever'': The Pet Cemetery
417(1)
The Funeral Director's Perspective
418(2)
Improving the Funeral Process
420(3)
Alternative Funerals, The Memorial Society Option
420(1)
Green Funerals
421(1)
Virtual Memorials
421(1)
Spontaneous Memorialization in Response to Violent Death
422(1)
Integrity and Abuse in the Funeral and Memorial Process
423(1)
Summary
424(5)
Do We Survive Death?
429(42)
Concept of Survival in Historical Perspective
431(7)
Key Points
435(1)
The Journey of the Dead
436(2)
Heavens and Hells
438(1)
The Desert Religions and Their One God
438(4)
Jewish Survival Belief in the Ancient World
438(1)
Heaven and Hell for Christians
439(1)
Islamic Paradise and Jahannam
440(1)
Science Rocks the Boat
441(1)
What Other People Believe
442(2)
Can Survival Be Proved?
444(1)
Near-Death Experiences: Evidence for Survival?
444(7)
Evidence Favoring the NDE as Proof of Survival
444(2)
Biomedical Attempts to Verify NDE Phenomena
446(1)
Eliminating other Explanations
447(1)
The Case Against the NDE as Proof of Survival
447(1)
Mystical, Depersonalization, and Hyperalertness Responses to Crisis
448(1)
Why Do People Not Have NDEs? An Alternative Explanation
448(1)
Are NDEs Hallucinations?
449(1)
NDEs as Exercises in Religious Imagination?
450(1)
What has been Learned from NDERs?
450(1)
The Dead as Evidence for Survival
451(7)
Deathbed Escorts: Safe Conduct to the Other World
452(1)
Communicating with the Dead: The Medium and the Channeler
453(1)
When Spiritism Was in Flower
453(1)
Channeling and Past Life Regression
454(1)
Ghosts
454(2)
The Ghost Dance: A Peaceful Vision Becomes a Tragedy
456(1)
Reincarnation
457(1)
Should We Survive Death?
458(1)
But What Kind of Survival?
459(2)
Assisted and Symbolic Survival
461(3)
Symbolic Immortality
461(1)
Assisted Immortality
462(2)
The Suicide-Survival Connection
464(1)
Summary
465(6)
How Can We Help?
471(22)
Caregiving and death education
``Compassionate Fatigue'': Burnout and the Health Care Provider
474(4)
Caregivers in Death-Salient Situations
475(1)
Staff Burnout: What Effects on Patients?
476(1)
How Can We Protect Ourselves from Burnout?
477(1)
Death Educators and Counselors: The ``Border Patrol''
478(1)
Death Education in Historical Perspective
478(4)
From Ancient Times
478(2)
The Medieval Heritage
480(2)
Death Education and Counseling: The Current Scene
482(3)
SimMan: An Interview with Beatrice Kastenbaum
484(1)
Counseling and the Counselors
485(1)
Characteristics of Professionals in the Death System
485(1)
Counseling and Psychotherapy
486(1)
How We All Can Help
486(2)
Summary
488(5)
Good Life, Good Death?
493(30)
Trying to make sense of it all
Three Paths to Death
496(1)
A Father Dies: A Mission Begins
497(2)
A Shift in the Meaning of Life and Death?
499(2)
Horrendous Death
501(5)
The Golden Rule Revisited
502(2)
Are We Live or on Tape? The Life-and-Death Challenges of Virtual Reality
504(2)
Utopia: A Better Death in a Better Place?
506(4)
Death in Utopia
508(1)
A Better Death in a Better Place?
509(1)
``The Good Death'': Fantasy or Reality?
510(3)
Extinction: Death of Life or Death of Death?
513(4)
St. Paul's Cathedral, 1623
513(2)
The Death of Species
515(2)
From Good Life to Good Death: A Personal Statement
517(1)
Summary
518(5)
Index 523


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...