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Decolonizing Methodologies : Research and Indigenous Peoples,9781856496247

Decolonizing Methodologies : Research and Indigenous Peoples

by
ISBN13:

9781856496247

ISBN10:
1856496244
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/15/1999
Publisher(s):
Zed Books
List Price: $32.95

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  • Outlines and Highlights for Decolonizing Methodologies : Research and Indigenous Peoples by Linda Tuhiwai Smith
    Outlines and Highlights for Decolonizing Methodologies : Research and Indigenous Peoples by Linda Tuhiwai Smith




Summary

From the vantage point of the colonized, the term 'research' is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods. The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as 'regimes of truth'. Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as 'discovery, 'claiming' and 'naming' through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web. The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as 'Other'. In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being. Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that 'when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed.'

Author Biography

Linda Tuhiwai Smith is an Associate Professor in Education and Director of the International Research Institute for Maori and Indigenous Education at the University of Auckland.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements ix
Introduction 1(18)
Imperialism, History, Writing and Theory
19(23)
Imperialism
20(5)
On being human
25(3)
Writing history and theory
28(1)
Is history important for indigenous peoples?
29(4)
Contested histories
33(2)
Is writing important for indigenous peoples?
35(2)
Writing theory
37(5)
Research Through Imperial Eyes
42(16)
The cultural formations of Western research
43(2)
The intersections of race and gender
45(2)
Conceptualizations of the individual and society
47(3)
Conceptions of space
50(3)
Conceptions of time
53(5)
Colonizing Knowledges
58(20)
Establishing the positional superiority of Western knowledge
59(6)
Colonizing the disciplines
65(3)
Disciplining the colonized
68(1)
Colonialism and `Native' intellectuals
69(3)
The `authentic, essentialist, deeply spiritual' Other
72(6)
Research Adventures on Indigenous Lands
78(17)
They came, They saw, They named, They claimed
80(3)
On the road to ... research
83(2)
Organizing research
85(3)
Trading the Other
88(2)
Defining the indigenous `problem'
90(5)
Notes from Down Under
95(12)
The end of one part the beginning of another
95(2)
The new language of imperialism
97(2)
Ten ways to be researched (colonized)
99(4)
The new millenium
103(4)
The Indigenous People's Project: Setting a New Agenda
107(16)
The social movement of indigenous peoples
108(4)
International mobilization
112(3)
An agenda for indigenous research
115(3)
Ethical research protocols
118(5)
Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda
123(19)
Community research
125(3)
Tribal research
128(1)
The case study of an indigenous research initiative
129(5)
Training indigenous researchers
134(3)
Insider/Outsider research
137(5)
Twenty-five Indigenous Projects
142(21)
The Projects
143(18)
Claiming
143(1)
Testimonies
144(1)
Story-telling
144(1)
Celebrating survival
145(1)
Remembering
146(1)
Indigenizing
146(1)
Intervening
147(1)
Revitalizing
147(1)
Connecting
148(1)
Reading
149(1)
Writing
149(1)
Representing
150(1)
Gendering
151(1)
Envisioning
152(1)
Reframing
153(1)
Restoring
154(1)
Returning
155(1)
Democratizing
156(1)
Networking
156(1)
Naming
157(1)
Protecting
158(1)
Creating
158(1)
Negotiating
159(1)
Discovering
160(1)
Sharing
160(1)
Summary
161(2)
Responding to the Imperatives of an Indigenous Agenda: A Case Study of Maori
163(20)
Western critiques of Western research
164(1)
The challenge of feminist analyses
165(3)
The Waitangi Tribunal and Te Kohanga Reo
168(1)
Research as an extension of knowledge - whose knowledge?
169(3)
The validity of Maori knowledge
172(3)
Negotiating new relationships with non-indigenous researchers
175(3)
Setting the boundaries to research by non-indigenous researchers
178(5)
Towards Developing Indigenous Methodologies: Kaupapa Maori Research
183(13)
Research by Maori
184(1)
A local approach to critical theory
185(4)
Kaupapa Maori research and positivism
189(2)
How does Kaupapa Maori research proceed?
191(1)
Setting strategic directions
192(4)
Conclusion: A Personal Journey 196(4)
Index 200


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