9780385479431

In Defense of Elitism

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780385479431

  • ISBN10:

    0385479433

  • Format: Trade Paper
  • Copyright: 1995-08-01
  • Publisher: Anchor

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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
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Summary

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning culture critic forTimemagazine comes the tremendously controversial, yet highly persuasive, argument that our devotion to the largely unexamined myth of egalitarianism lies at the heart of the ongoing "dumbing of America." Americans have always stubbornly clung to the myth of egalitarianism, of the supremacy of the individual average man. But here, at long last, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic William A. Henry III takes on, and debunks, some basic, fundamentally ingrained ideas: that everyone is pretty much alike (and should be); that self-fulfillment is more imortant thant objective achievement; that everyone has something significant to contribute; that all cultures offer something equally worthwhile; that a truly just society would automatically produce equal success results across lines of race, class, and gender; and that the common man is almost always right. Henry makes clear, in a book full of vivid examples and unflinching opinions, that while these notions are seductively democratic they are also hopelessly wrong.

Table of Contents

The Vital Lie
1(32)
``Good Old Golden Rule Days''
33(28)
Affirmative Confusion
61(40)
Why Can't a Man Be More Like a Woman?
101(26)
Nature and Nurture
127(22)
The Museum of Clear Ideas
149(20)
Noah's Ark, Feminist Red Riding Hood, Karaoke Peasants, and the Joy of Cooking
169(26)
Politics by Saxophone
195

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