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Delivering Business Intelligence with Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Utilize Microsoft's Data Warehousing, Mining & Reporting Tools to Provide Critical Intelligence to A

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780072260908

ISBN10:
0072260904
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/23/2006
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Osborne Media
List Price: $52.00

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Summary

Transform disparate enterprise data into actionable business intelligencePut timely, mission-critical information in the hands of employees across your organization using Microsoft SQL Server 2005 and the comprehensive information in this unique resource.Delivering Business Intelligence with Microsoft SQL Server 2005shows you, step-by-step, how to author, customize, and distribute information that will give your company the competitive edge. It's all right here--from data mining, warehousing, and scripting techniques to MDX queries, KPI analysis, and the all-new Unified Dimensional Model. Real-world examples, start-to-finish exercises, and downloadable code throughout illustrate all of the integration, analysis, and reporting capabilities of SQL Server 2005.

Author Biography

Brian Larson (Arden Hill, MN) is an MCSD and MCDBA, Chief of Technology at Superior Consulting Services and author of Osborne's Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii
Part I Business Intelligence
Equipping the Organization for Effective Decision Making
3(10)
Effective Decision Making
4(2)
Who Is a Decision Maker?
4(1)
What Is an Effective Decision?
5(1)
Keys to Effective Decision Making
6(5)
Are We Going Hither or Yon?
7(1)
Is Your Map Upside-Down?
8(1)
Panicked Gossip, the Crow's Nest, or the Wireless
9(2)
Business Intelligence
11(2)
Business Intelligence and Microsoft SQL Server 2005
12(1)
Making the Most of What You've Got---Using Business Intelligence
13(12)
What Business Intelligence Can Do For You
14(2)
When We Know What We Are Looking For
14(1)
Discovering New Questions and Their Answers
15(1)
Business Intelligence at Many Levels
16(4)
The Top of the Pyramid
17(1)
Mid-Level
18(1)
The Broad Base
19(1)
Maximum Miniatures, Inc.
20(3)
Business Needs
20(1)
Current Systems
21(2)
Building the Foundation
23(2)
Searching for the Source---The Source of Business Intelligence
25(18)
Seeking the Source
26(3)
Transactional Data
26(3)
The Data Mart
29(12)
Features of a Data Mart
30(2)
Data Mart Structure
32(9)
Snowflakes, Stars, and Analysis Services
41(2)
One-Stop Shopping---The Unified Dimensional Model
43(18)
Online Analytical Processing
44(9)
Building OLAP---Out of Cubes
45(3)
Features of an OLAP System
48(2)
Architecture
50(2)
Disadvantages
52(1)
The Unified Dimensional Model
53(7)
Structure
53(6)
Advantages
59(1)
Tools of the Trade
60(1)
First Steps---Beginning the Development of Business Intelligence
61(34)
The Business Intelligence Development Studio
62(20)
Visual Studio
62(1)
Navigating the Business Intelligence Development Studio
63(16)
Business Intelligence Development Studio Options
79(3)
The SQL Server Management Studio
82(10)
The SQL Server Management Studio User Interface
83(9)
Don Your Hardhat
92(3)
Part II Defining Business Intelligence Structures
Building Foundations---Creating and Populating Data Marts
95(46)
Data Mart
96(3)
Who Needs a Data Mart Anyway?
96(3)
Designing a Data Mart
99(40)
Decision Makers' Needs
100(1)
Available Data
101(1)
Data Mart Structures
101(13)
Creating a Data Mart Using the SQL Server Management Studio
114(15)
Creating a Data Mart Using the Business Intelligence Development Studio
129(10)
The Benefits of Integration
139(2)
Fill'er up---Using Integration Services for Populating Data Marts
141(132)
Integration Services
142(101)
Package Structure
142(20)
Package Items
162(81)
Package Development Features
243(22)
Programming in Integration Services Packages
243(9)
Package Development Tools
252(12)
Migrating from SQL Server 2000 DTS Packages
264(1)
Putting Integration Services Packages into Production
265(4)
Deploying Integration Services Packages
265(3)
Executing Integration Services Packages
268(1)
Meanwhile, Back at the Unified Dimensional Model (UDM)
269(4)
Part III Analyzing Cube Content
Cubism---Measures and Dimensions
273(48)
Where We've Been and Where We're Going
274(20)
Completing the Manufacturing Data Mart
274(12)
Creating a Cube
286(8)
Measures
294(12)
Measure Groups
294(3)
Made-up Facts---Calculated Measures
297(3)
It Doesn't Add Up---Measure Aggregates Other than SUM
300(6)
Dimensions
306(13)
Managing Dimensions
307(1)
Relating Dimensions to Measure Groups
308(3)
Types of Dimensions
311(3)
Slowly Changing Dimensions
314(5)
You Are Special
319(2)
Bells and Whistles---Special Features of OLAP Cubes
321(54)
Where No Cube Has Gone Before
322(16)
Deploying and Processing
323(1)
Deploying from the Business Intelligence Development Studio
324(6)
Deploying from the Analysis Services Deployment Wizard
330(8)
Additional Cube Features
338(35)
Linked Objects
338(3)
The Business Intelligence Wizard
341(1)
Key Performance Indicators
342(7)
Actions
349(3)
Partitions
352(18)
Perspectives
370(1)
Translations
371(2)
More Sophisticated Scripting
373(2)
Writing a New Script---MDX Scripting
375(46)
Terms and Concepts
376(27)
Where Are We?
376(19)
Getting There from Here
395(8)
Putting MDX Scripting to Work
403(16)
Cube Security
403(11)
This Year to Last Year Comparisons and Year-To-Date Rollups
414(5)
Extracting Data from Cubes
419(2)
Pulling It Out and Building It Up---MDX Queries
421(36)
The MDX Select Statement
422(26)
The Basic MDX SELECT Statement
423(11)
Additional Tools for Querying
434(11)
Additional Dimensions
445(3)
Additional MDX Syntax
448(6)
Operators
448(2)
Functions
450(4)
Can You Dig It?
454(3)
Part IV Mining
Panning for Gold---Introduction to Data Mining
457(26)
What Is Data Mining?
458(14)
Order from Chaos
458(5)
Tasks Accomplished by Data Mining
463(6)
Steps for Data Mining
469(3)
Data Mining Algorithms
472(10)
Microsoft Decision Trees
472(1)
Microsoft Naive Bayes
473(1)
Microsoft Clustering
474(2)
Microsoft Association
476(1)
Microsoft Sequence Clustering
477(2)
Microsoft Time Series
479(1)
Microsoft Neural Network
480(2)
Grab a Pick Axe
482(1)
Building the Mine---Working with the Data Mining Model
483(36)
Data Mining Structure
484(14)
Data Columns
484(1)
Data Mining Model
485(1)
Training Data Set
485(13)
Mining Model Viewer
498(20)
Microsoft Decision Trees
499(6)
Microsoft Naive Bayes
505(4)
Microsoft Clustering
509(3)
Microsoft Neural Network
512(1)
Microsoft Association
513(4)
Microsoft Sequence Clustering
517(1)
Microsoft Time Series
517(1)
Reading the Tea Leaves
518(1)
Spelunking---Exploration Using Data Mining
519(36)
Mining Accuracy Chart
520(14)
Column Mapping
520(5)
Lift Chart
525(5)
Profit Chart
530(2)
Classification Matrix
532(2)
Mining Model Prediction
534(10)
A Singleton Query
534(3)
A Prediction Join Query
537(7)
Data Mining Extensions
544(8)
Prediction Query Syntax
545(2)
Types of Prediction Queries
547(5)
Special Delivery
552(3)
Part V Delivering
On Report---Delivering Business Intelligence with Reporting Services
555(118)
Reporting Services
556(4)
Report Structure
557(2)
Report Delivery
559(1)
Report Serving Architecture
560(8)
Report Server
560(2)
The Parts of the Whole
562(3)
Reporting Services Installation Considerations
565(3)
Report Creation
568(59)
Data Regions
569(58)
Report Manager
627(12)
Folders
628(1)
The Report Manager
628(1)
Deploying Reports Using the Report Designer
629(2)
Uploading Reports Using Report Manager
631(6)
Printing from Report Manager
637(2)
Managing Reports on the Report Server
639(17)
Security
639(9)
Linked Reports
648(1)
Report Caching
648(5)
Execution Snapshots
653(1)
Report History
653(1)
Standard Subscriptions
654(1)
Data-Driven Subscriptions
655(1)
Ad Hoc Reporting
656(15)
Report Model
657(8)
Report Builder Basics
665(6)
Putting It All Together
671(2)
Let's Get Together---Integrating OLAP with Your Applications
673(44)
ADOMD.NET
674(9)
ADOMD.NET Structure
674(3)
ADOMD.NET Example
677(6)
Using Reporting Services Without the Report Manager
683(33)
URL Access
683(18)
Web Service Access
701(6)
The Report Viewer Control
707(9)
Ready-Made Solution
716(1)
Another Point of View---Excel Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts
717(28)
Excel
718(27)
Creating Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts
719(1)
Pivot Table
720(15)
Pivot Chart
735(10)
New Capabilities, New Opportunities
745


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