CART

(0) items

Design Patterns : Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software

by ; ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780201633610

ISBN10:
0201633612
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/31/1994
Publisher(s):
Addison-Wesley Professional
List Price: $59.99

Rent Book

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$32.99

Buy Used Book

Usually Ships in 2-3 Business Days
U9780201633610
$38.99

Buy New Book

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
N9780201633610
$50.99

eBook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $26.14
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 10/31/1994.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

Capturing the wealth of experience about the design of object-oriented software, these four top-notch authors show how object-oriented systems exhibit recurring patterns and structures of objects that solve particular design problems, allowing designers to reuse successful designs and architectures without having to rediscover the design solutions. Central to this book is a catalog of 23 design patterns that have seen successful practical application and are representative of good object-oriented design. Each pattern describes the circumstances in which it is applicable, when it can be applied in view of other design constraints, and the consequences and tradeoffs of using the pattern in a larger design. Finally, every pattern includes code that shows how it may be implemented in object-oriented programming languages like C++ and Smalltalk.

Author Biography

Dr. Erich Gamma is technical director at the Software Technology Center of Object Technology International in Zurich, Switzerland. Dr. Richard Helm is a member of the Object Technology Practice Group in the IBM Consulting Group in Sydney, Australia. Dr. Ralph Johnson is a faculty member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Computer Science Department.

John Vlissides is a member of the research staff at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Hawthorne, New York. He has practiced object-oriented technology for more than a decade as a designer, implementer, researcher, lecturer, and consultant. In addition to co-authoring Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, he is co-editor of the book Pattern Languages of Program Design 2 (both from Addison-Wesley). He and the other co-authors of Design Patterns are recipients of the 1998 Dr. Dobb's Journal Excellence in Programming Award.



0201633612AB09122003

Table of Contents

Preface xi(2)
Foreword xiii(2)
Guide to Readers xv
1 Introduction
1(32)
1.1 What Is a Design Pattern?
2(2)
1.2 Design Patterns in Smalltalk MVC
4(2)
1.3 Describing Design Patterns
6(2)
1.4 The Catalog of Design Patterns
8(1)
1.5 Organizing the Catalog
9(2)
1.6 How Design Patterns Solve Design Problems
11(17)
1.7 How to Select a Design Pattern
28(1)
1.8 How to Use a Design Pattern
29(4)
2 A Case Study: Designing a Document Editor
33(46)
2.1 Design Problems
33(2)
2.2 Document Structure
35(5)
2.3 Formatting
40(3)
2.4 Embellishing the User Interface
43(4)
2.5 Supporting Multiple Look-and-Feel Standards
47(4)
2.6 Supporting Multiple Window Systems
51(7)
2.7 User Operations
58(6)
2.8 Spelling Checking and Hyphenation
64(12)
2.9 Summary
76(3)
Design Pattern Catalog 79(280)
3 Creational Patterns
81(54)
Abstract Factory
87(10)
Builder
97(10)
Factory Method
107(10)
Prototype
117(10)
Singleton
127(8)
Discussion of Creational Patterns
135(2)
4 Structural Patterns
137(82)
Adapter
139(12)
Bridge
151(12)
Composite
163(12)
Decorator
175(10)
Facade
185(10)
Flyweight
195(12)
Proxy
207(12)
Discussion of Structural Patterns
219(2)
5 Behavioral Patterns
221(124)
Chain of Responsibility
223(10)
Command
233(10)
Interpreter
243(14)
Iterator
257(16)
Mediator
273(10)
Memento
283(10)
Observer
293(12)
State
305(10)
Strategy
315(10)
Template Method
325(6)
Visitor
331(14)
Discussion of Behavioral Patterns
345(6)
6 Conclusion
351(8)
6.1 What to Expect from Design Patterns
351(4)
6.2 A Brief History
355(1)
6.3 The Pattern Community
356(2)
6.4 An Invitation
358(1)
6.5 A Parting Thought
358(1)
A Glossary 359(4)
B Guide to Notation 363(6)
B.1 Class Diagram 363(1)
B.2 Object Diagram 364(2)
B.3 Interaction Diagram 366(3)
C Foundation Classes 369(6)
C.1 List 369(3)
C.2 Iterator 372(1)
C.3 ListIterator 372(1)
C.4 Point 373(1)
C.5 Rect 374(1)
Bibliography 375(8)
Index 383

Excerpts

This book isn't an introduction to object-oriented technology or design. Many books already do a good job of that. This book assumes you are reasonably proficient in at least one object-oriented programming language, and you should have some experience in object-oriented design as well. You definitely shouldn't have to rush to the nearest dictionary the moment we mention "types" and"polymorphism," or "interface" as opposed to "implementation" inheritance.On the other hand, this isn't an advanced technical treatise either. It's a book of design patterns that describes simple and elegant solutions to specific problems in object-oriented software design. Design patterns capture solutions that have developed and evolved over time. Hence they aren't the designs people They reflect untold redesign and recoding as developers have struggled for greater reuse and flexibility in their software.Design patterns capture these solutions in a succinct and easily applied form.The design patterns require neither unusual language features nor amazing programming tricks with which to astound your friends and managers. All can be implemented in standard object-oriented languages, though they might take a little more work than ad hoc solutions. But the extra effort invariably pays dividends in increased flexibility and reusability.Once you understand the design patterns and have had an "Aha!" (and not just a "Huh?") experience with them, you won't ever think about object-oriented design in the same way. You'll have insights that can make your own designs more flexible, modular, reusable, and understandable - which is why you're interested in object-oriented technology in the first place, right?A word of warning and encouragement: Don't worry if you don't understand this book completely on the first reading. We didn't understand it all on the first writing! Remember that this isn't a book to read once and put on a shelf. We hope you'll find yourself referring to it again and again for design insights and for inspiration.This book has had a long gestation. It has seen four countries, three of its authors' marriages, and the birth of two (unrelated) offspring.Many people have had a part in its development. Special thanks are due Bruce Andersen, Kent Beck, and Andre Weinand for their inspiration and advice. We also thank those who reviewed drafts of the manuscript: Roger Bielefeld, Grady Booch, Tom Cargill, Marshall Cline, Ralph Hyre, Brian Kernighan, Thomas Laliberty, Mark Lorenz, Arthur Riel, Doug Schmidt, Clovis Tondo, Steve Vinoski, and Rebecca Wirfs-Brock. We are also grateful to the team at Addison-Wesley for their help and patience: Kate Habib, Tiffany Moore, Lisa Raffaele, Pradeepa Siva, and John Wait. Special thanks to Carl Kessler, Danny Sabbah, and Mark Wegman at IBM Research for their unflagging support of this work.Last but certainly not least, we thank everyone on the Internet and points beyond who commented on versions of the patterns, offered encouraging words, and told us that what we were doing was worthwhile. These people include but are not limited to Ran Alexander, Jon Avotins, Steve Berczuk, Julian Berdych, Matthias Bohlen, John Brant, Allan Clarke, Paul Chisholm, Jens Coldewey, Dave Collins, Jim Coplien, Don Dwiggins, Gabriele Elia, Doug Felt, Brian Foote, Denis Fortin, Ward Harold, Hermann Hueni, Nayeem Islam, Bikramjit Kalra, Paul Keefer, Thomas Kofler, Doug Lea, Dan LaLiberte, James Long, Ann Louise Luu, Pundi Madhavan, Brian Marick, Robert Martin, Dave McComb, Carl McConnell, Christine Mingins, Hanspeter Mossenbock, Eric Newton, Marianne Ozcan, Roxsan Payette, Larry Podmolik, George Radin, Sita Ramakrishnan, Russ Ramirez, Dirk Riehle, Bryan Rosenburg, Aamod Sane, Duri Schmidt, Robert Seidl, Xin Shu, and Bill Walker.We don't consider this collection of design patterns complete and static; it's more a recording of our current thoughts on design. We welcome comments on it, whether criticisms of our exa


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...