9780130894977

Developing and Training Human Resources in Organizations (Prenticee Hall Series in Human Resources)

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130894977

  • ISBN10:

    0130894974

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-09-25
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Supplemental Materials

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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
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Summary

A member of the AWL Series on Managing Human Resources! Using real-world examples to close the gap between theory and practice, the authors focus on a systematic process of identifying training needs, building programs based on job information, and evaluating training in terms of objectives. Look for thorough but concise treatment of today's key training issues, such as goal-setting theory, new legal thinking, and the training of minorities.Organizational factors affecting training and development, identifying training needs, maximizing the trainee's learning, evaluating training programs, on- and off-site training methods, developing and training leaders, theoretical approaches, management and executive development, societal concerns.For human resource generalists and specialists in the private and public business sectors.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction
1(14)
Purposes of Training and Development
2(3)
Popularity of Training and Development
5(4)
The Relationship of Training and Development to Other Human Resource Functions
9(1)
Overview of the Book
10(2)
Final Comments
12(3)
The Organizational Role of the Training Specialist
15(26)
Considerations in Organizing the Training Department
16(3)
The Organization's Corporate Strategy
16(1)
Organization Structure
17(1)
Technology
18(1)
Attitude Toward Training
18(1)
A Financial Approach to Training
19(2)
Selecting the Training Staff
21(3)
Training the Trainer
24(4)
Maintaining Ongoing Managerial Support
28(2)
Legal Aspects of Training and Development
30(7)
Americans with Disabilities Act
37(1)
Final Comments
38(3)
Identifying Training Needs
41(35)
Organization Analysis
42(8)
Task Analysis
50(14)
Job Description
50(2)
Task Identification
52(9)
KSA Identification
61(1)
Course Objectives
61(2)
Design of Program
63(1)
Content Validity
63(1)
Individual Analysis
64(8)
Step 1
65(4)
Step 2
69(3)
The Final Product: A Training Plan
72(1)
Final Comments
73(3)
Maximizing the Trainee's Learning
76(51)
Trainability
76(5)
Arrangement of the Training Environment
81(26)
Conditions of Practice
82(5)
Feedback: Knowledge of Results
87(3)
Meaningfulness of the Material
90(1)
Individual Differences
91(8)
Behavior Modeling
99(2)
Maintaining Motivation
101(6)
Retention and Transfer of Learning
107(6)
Before
108(1)
During
109(2)
After
111(2)
Organizational Factors Affecting Transfer of Training
113(6)
Pay and Promotion
113(1)
Environmental Constraints
114(1)
Social Variables Affecting Transfer of Training
115(1)
Supervisory Support
116(1)
Transfer Climate, Continuous-Learning Culture, and the Learning Organization
117(2)
Final Comments
119(8)
Evaluating Training Programs
127(40)
Measures of Training Effectiveness
127(21)
Reactions
128(7)
Learning
135(2)
Behavior on the Job
137(3)
Results Criteria and Utility Analysis
140(6)
Summary
146(2)
How Should a Training Evaluation Study Be Designed?
148(12)
More Sophisticated Evaluation Designs
154(6)
How Should Evaluation Designs Be Analyzed Statistically?
160(1)
Final Comments
161(6)
On-Site Training Methods
167(43)
Orientation Training and the Socialization of New Employees
168(7)
On-the-Job Training
175(5)
Apprenticeship Training
180(2)
Job Aids
182(2)
Coaching
184(4)
Mentoring
188(2)
Technology-Based Training
190(7)
Floppy Disks
191(1)
CD-ROM
192(1)
DVD-ROM
192(1)
Electronic Performance Support Systems
192(1)
Internet and Intranet
193(1)
Multimedia
194(1)
Virtual Reality
194(1)
TBT Best Practice
194(2)
TBT and the Older Employee
196(1)
Cross-Training or Job Rotation
197(2)
Career Development
199(7)
Final Comments
206(4)
Off-Site Training Methods
210(13)
Instructor-Led Classrooms
211(3)
Audiovisual Techniques
214(1)
Video Teleconferencing
215(2)
Corporate Universities and Institutes
217(1)
Equipment and Virtual Reality Simulators
218(3)
Final Comments
221(2)
Developing and Training Leaders: Theoretical Approaches
223(45)
Self-Awareness
223(10)
Managerial Role Theory
224(3)
Henry Mintzberg
Double-Loop Learning
227(2)
Chris Argyris
The Leader Match Concept
229(4)
Fred E. Fiedler
Managerial Skills
233(11)
Vroom-Yetton Model
234(4)
Grid Seminars
238(3)
Robert R. Blake
Jane S. Mouton
Leader-Member Exchange
241(3)
George B. Graen
Motivation
244(17)
Role Motivation Theory
244(2)
John Miner
Achievement Motivation Theory
246(3)
David McClelland
Survey Feedback
249(2)
Rensis Likert
Behavior Modification
251(4)
B. F. Skinner
Social Learning Theory
255(6)
Albert Bandura
Final Comments
261(7)
Management and Executive Development
268(29)
Self-Awareness
269(8)
T-Group Training
269(2)
Self-Directed Management Development
271(2)
360° Feedback
273(4)
Job Skills
277(14)
Seminars, Workshops and Conferences
277(2)
Case Study
279(1)
Managerial and Executive Mentoring
280(1)
Rational Manager Training
281(2)
Outdoor Experiential Training
283(1)
Developmental Assessment Centers
284(2)
Role Playing
286(3)
Management Computer Simulations
289(1)
Action Learning
290(1)
Motivation
291(2)
Special Job Assignments
291(1)
Real-Time Coaching
292(1)
Final Comments
293(4)
Societal Concerns
297(46)
Special Issues and Groups
297(11)
Telecommuting Training
308(2)
The Manager and Professional
310(13)
Training to Improve Rating Accuracy
310(1)
Cross-Cultural Training
311(3)
Professional Obsolescence
314(2)
Employee Assistance Programs
316(1)
Stress Management
317(5)
Time Management
322(1)
Into the Twenty-First Century
323(14)
Training for the Prevention of Sexual and Racial Harassment
323(2)
Diversity Training
325(2)
Wellness Training
327(2)
Safety Training
329(3)
Customer Service Training
332(2)
Team Skills Training
334(3)
Final Comments
337(6)
Author Index 343(2)
Subject Index 345

Excerpts

PrefaceSince we published the second edition ofDeveloping Human Resources in Organizationsin 1991, we've seen two major trends in training and development activities in both the private and public sectors in North America. First, more organizations are providing training and development for their employees at all levels. Second, training expenditures are increasing steadily. Today, a typical organization devotes as much as 1.8 percent of their total payroll toward training employees.There are many societal changes responsible for increasing the popularity of training and development activities. First, with the low unemployment rate pausing a very tight labor market, organizations are competing with one another to attract and retain talented people. One important way of doing this is by providing better training and career development opportunities than one's competitors. Second, as the workforce becomes more diverse demographically, organizations have a great deal of pressure on them to hire, promote, and train women, minorities, individuals over 40, and people with disabilities. Third, as a result of the rapid changes in technology, employees need to be retrained on new equipment, so that they do not become technically obsolescent. Fourth, this new era of globalization and the increase of multinational organizations put pressure on companies to provide training to employees who will have overseas assignments or who work in the United States or Canada but have to interact with individuals from other countries. Finally, through numerous mergers and acquisitions, North American employees are finding that their jobs are changing and, consequently, they have to learn new things.With all of this in mind, the third edition ofDeveloping and Training Human Resources in Organizationsis intended for teachers and students as well as for human resource generalists and specialists in the private and public business sectors. Thus, we tried to make our language and writing style as straightforward as possible. We also tried to provide our readers with real-world examples, while, at the same time, making certain that we are-not falling into the trap of advertising a particular consulting firm's products or services. References are provided throughout the book to substantiate key findings and to provide an exhaustive resource base for those readers who want to study a topic in greater detail. CONTENT CHANGES IN THE THIRD EDITIONSince the second edition, we continue to work in this field as practitioners, researchers, and teachers. If we had to choose the major development that has impacted human resources in the past 10 years, it would definitely be the impact of computer technology on the delivery of training and development programs. The onset of technology-based training (i.e., Internet, intranet, CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs) has revolutionized this field!We organized this third edition similar to the second edition. We continue to use our nine-cell scheme (i.e., three goalsxthree strategies) for categorizing the training and development methods that are currently being used by organizations. Although there are times when this model is frustrating because a particular training or development method could be placed in more than one category, it is still the best method for conceptualizing and differentiating various employee training and management development approaches.Chapter 1 provides an overview of training and development. We revised and updated the statistics to reflect their current increase in popularity. We feel that it's important for readers to appreciate the fact that training and development can't be implemented successfully without taking into consideration their relationship with other human resource management activities such as staffing, performance appraisal, and organization development. The title of Chapter 2 has upgraded from "Organizational Factor

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