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Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education,9780766800311
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Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780766800311

ISBN10:
0766800318
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/19/1998
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $97.33
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Summary

This new edition offers practical guidance for implementing developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth through age eight. It includes clear discussions and examples of what is best practice to nurture development of the whole child. Current issues such as readiness, whole language, multi-age grouping, and cultural diversity are addressed with an emphasis on child-centered curriculum. The application of theory to real situations, dialogues and interactions give direction to educators, caregivers, administrators and parents.

Table of Contents

Preface ix(2)
Acknowledgments xi(2)
About the Author xiii
SECTION ONE Defining Developmentally Appropriate Practice xiv
CHAPTER 1 What It Is
2(17)
Background of the Guidelines
3(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice--What Is It?
6(2)
Basic Principles of Development
8(3)
Avoiding Misunderstandings about Developmentally Appropriate Practice
11(8)
CHAPTER 2 What It Is Not
19(15)
Reasons for Developmentally Inappropriate Practice
20(3)
Contrasting Developmentally Inappropriate and Appropriate Practice
23(5)
Results of Developmentally Appropriate vs. Inappropriate Practice
28(6)
CHAPTER 3 Understanding Play: Its Importance in Developmentally Appropriate Practice
34(14)
What Is Play?
35(1)
Categories of Play
35(2)
Social Stages of Play
37(1)
Play and Development
38(4)
Conditions That Support Play
42(6)
CHAPTER 4 Planning for Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum
48(16)
Why Not Traditional Planning?
49(3)
What Is Curriculum?
52(1)
What Is Emergent Curriculum?
53(2)
Strategies for Planning for Emergent Curriculum
55(5)
What about Planning Forms?
60(1)
Changing the Planning Process
60(4)
SECTION TWO Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments 64(68)
CHAPTER 5 For Infants
66(14)
The Nature of Babies
67(1)
Environment to Nurture Trust
68(2)
Environment to Nurture Attachment
70(2)
Environment to Nurture Mobility
72(1)
Environment for the Senses
72(2)
Environment for Language
74(1)
Rethink the Traditional
74(1)
Outdoors for Infants
75(1)
Health and Safety
75(1)
Materials for Infant Rooms
76(1)
Schedule Considerations
77(1)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Environment for Infants
77(3)
CHAPTER 6 For Toddlers
80(15)
What Are Toddlers Like?
81(1)
What Do Toddlers Do?
82(1)
What Do Toddlers Need?
83(1)
Environment to Support Autonomy
84(1)
Environment for Separateness
85(2)
Environment for Movement
87(1)
Environment for Self-Help Skills
88(1)
Environment for Sensorimotor Exploration
89(2)
Schedule and Transition Considerations
91(1)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Environment for Toddlers
92(3)
CHAPTER 7 For Preschoolers
95(19)
What Are Preschoolers Like?
96(1)
What Do Preschoolers Do?
97(1)
What Do Preschoolers Need?
98(1)
Dimensions of Environments
99(2)
Environment for Initiative
101(2)
Environment for Learning through Play
103(2)
Outdoor Play
105(1)
Environment for Self-Control
106(1)
Schedules for Preschoolers
107(2)
Transitions
109(2)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environment for Preschoolers
111(3)
CHAPTER 8 For Primary-Aged Children
114(18)
What Are Primary-Aged Children Like?
115(1)
What Do Primary-Aged Children Do?
116(1)
What Do Primary-Aged Children Need?
117(1)
Differences in Physical Environments for Primary-Aged Children
118(1)
Environment for a Sense of Industry
119(5)
Environment for Literacy
124(1)
Environment for Relationships
125(1)
Schedule
126(1)
After School Child Care
127(3)
Things Not Found in Developmentally Appropriate Primary Classrooms
130(2)
SECTION THREE Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Environments 132(76)
CHAPTER 9 For Infants
134(12)
Social/Emotional Issues in Infancy
135(2)
Developmentally Appropriate Interaction Practices
137(1)
Respect
138(1)
Sensitivity of Responsiveness
139(1)
Close Physical Contact
140(1)
Repetition and Consistency
141(1)
Recognition of Limitations
142(4)
CHAPTER 10 For Toddlers
146(18)
Social/Emotional Issues of Toddlerhood
147(2)
Developmentally Appropriate Interaction with Toddlers
149(15)
CHAPTER 11 For Preschoolers
164(26)
Social/Emotional Issues of the Preschool Years
165(2)
Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Interaction
167(1)
Implications for Teachers
168(2)
Gender Identity
170(1)
Cultural and Racial Identity
171(2)
Friendship
173(2)
Teaching Prosocial Behavior
175(2)
Guidance Toward Self-Control
177(4)
Helping Preschoolers with Emotional Control
181(9)
CHAPTER 12 For Primary-Aged Children
190(18)
Social/Emotional Issues for the Primary Years
191(3)
Implications for Teachers Planning Social/Emotional Environments
194(3)
Self-Esteem
197(2)
Thoughts about Games with Rules, and Competition vs. Cooperation in Developmentally Appropriate Classrooms
199(2)
Thoughts about Mixed-Age Groupings
201(1)
Helping Primary-Aged Children with Moral Development
202(2)
Helping Primary-Aged Children with Emotional Growth
204(4)
SECTION FOUR Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language Environments 208(88)
CHAPTER 13 For Infants
210(17)
Understanding Sensorimotor Intelligence
212(1)
Language Development
213(1)
Principles for Cognitive Development
214(4)
Materials Appropriate at Various Stages
218(2)
Appropriate Adult Roles to Nurture Cognitive Growth
220(1)
Nurturing Language Development
221(4)
Unsupportive Cognitive/Language Environments
225(2)
CHAPTER 14 For Toddlers
227(18)
Understanding Toddler Cognitive Development
228(2)
Language Development
230(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive Environments
230(2)
Principles of Teaching Toddlers
232(1)
Planning
233(1)
Materials and Activities for Sensorimotor Learning
234(5)
Principles of Teaching Language to Toddlers
239(2)
Group Time for Toddlers?
241(1)
Unsupportive Cognitive/Language Environments
242(3)
CHAPTER 15 For Preschoolers
245(26)
Preoperational Thinking
246(2)
Play As Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum
248(2)
Integrated Curriculum
250(2)
Teachers' Roles in Providing for Play
252(10)
Summary of Developmentally Appropriate Preschool Cognitive Environments
262(1)
Language Environments
262(1)
Whole Language
263(1)
Components of an Appropriate Preschool Language Environment
264(7)
CHAPTER 16 For Primary-Aged Children
271(25)
Preoperational and Concrete Operational Thinking and Developmentally Appropriate Practice
272(1)
Other Aspects of Readiness for School Learning Tasks
273(1)
Readiness
274(2)
Cognitive/Language Goals of Primary Education
276(2)
Components of Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language Environments
278(12)
Assessment vs. Achievement Testing
290(6)
SECTION FIVE Steps Toward More Developmentally Appropriate Practice 296(47)
CHAPTER 17 Helping Teachers Change to More Appropriate Practice
298(11)
Change is Difficult
299(1)
A Fifteen-Point Plan for Change
300(9)
CHAPTER 18 Helping Parents and Communities Understand Developmentally Appropriate Practice
309(13)
Reciprocal Relationships with Families
310(2)
Facilitating Understanding of Developmentally Appropriate Practice
312(1)
Teacher Attitudes
313(2)
Key Issues
315(1)
Principles for Enlisting Support
316(2)
Strategies to Resolve Issues with Parents and the Community
318(4)
CHAPTER 19 A Look at Programs Based on Developmental Principles
322(21)
The Municipal Infant-Toddler Centers and Preschools of Reggio Emilia
323(9)
The GOLD Program in Scarborough, Maine
332(11)
Index 343


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