CART

(0) items

Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum And Development in Early Education,9781401898168
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum And Development in Early Education

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9781401898168

ISBN10:
1401898165
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/8/2006
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $127.33

Buy New Textbook

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
N9781401898168
$114.60

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $4.31
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 3/8/2006.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Related Products


  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice : Curriculum and Development in Early Education
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice 3E+Curriculum Pets Pkg
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice 3E+Curriculum Pets Pkg
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice Curriculum and Development in Early Education
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice Curriculum and Development in Early Education
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum and Development in Early Education, 4th Edition
    Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum and Development in Early Education, 4th Edition




Summary

Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Curriculum and Development in Early Education, 3e is a thoughtful and comprehensive reference that is now even more effective with the addition of several new features and enhanced content. The book takes a topical approach and assumes some basic child development knowledge/experience, and is intended as a guide for thoughtful consideration of classroom and caregiver practices. In the first section, developmentally appropriate practice is discussed and explored, including an in-depth, extended section on the theory and research of play. Subsequent sections address environments such as physical, social/emotional, and cognitive/language. The coverage of these important environments is comprehensive and individually addresses appropriate practice for all early childhood age groups. The fifth section moves into a discussion of making changes for the teachers and caregivers and how to gain support for those changes. Well-known curriculum approaches are also explored in-depth, allowing the reader to understand how these approaches fit into the principles of developmentally appropriate practice. Some new features include What Would You Do?” and Think About It” sections that encourage further thought and discussion, as well as current reference and reading suggestions to allow the reader to continue the learning process on their own.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Acknowledgments xi
About the Author xii
SECTION ONE Defining Developmentally Appropriate Practice
3(88)
Guest Editorial
2(2)
David Elkind
Defining Developmentally Appropriate Practice
4(30)
What Is the Position Statement on Developmentally Appropriate Practice?
8(4)
Basic Principles of Development
12(5)
Results of Developmentally Appropriate versus Inappropriate Practice
17(5)
Considering Some Misunderstandings about Developmentally Appropriate Practice
22(12)
Understanding Play: Its Importance in Developmentally Appropriate Practice
34(26)
What Is Play?
35(1)
Categories of Play
36(2)
Social Stages of Play
38(2)
Play and Development
40(5)
Play as Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum
45(3)
Conditions That Support Play
48(4)
Issues Involving Play
52(8)
Planning for Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum
60(31)
What Is Curriculum?
61(5)
Integrated Curriculum and the Standards Movement
66(2)
The Cycle of Planning
68(9)
What Is Emergent Curriculum?
77(2)
Strategies for Planning for Emergent Curriculum
79(5)
What about Planning Forms?
84(1)
Changing the Planning Process
85(6)
SECTION TWO Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments
91(96)
Guest Editorial
90(2)
James Greenman
Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments: For Infants
92(18)
The Nature of Babies
93(1)
What Do Babies Need?
94(1)
Environment to Nurture Trust
94(7)
Environment to Nurture Attachment
Environment to Nurture Mobility
Environment for the Senses
Environment for Language
Rethink the Traditional
101(2)
Outdoors for Infants
103(1)
Health and Safety
104(1)
Materials for Infant Rooms
105(1)
Schedule Considerations
106(1)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Environment for Infants
107(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments: For Toddlers
110(19)
What Are Toddlers Like?
111(1)
What Do Toddlers Do?
112(1)
What Do Toddlers Need?
113(7)
Environment to Support Autonomy
Environment for Separateness
Environment for Movement
Environment for Self-Help Skills
120(4)
Environment for Sensorimotor Exploration
Schedule and Transition Considerations
124(2)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Environment for Toddlers
126(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments: For Preschoolers
129(32)
What Are Preschoolers Like?
130(2)
What Do Preschoolers Do?
132(1)
What Do Preschoolers Need?
132(17)
Dimensions of Environments
Environment for Initiative
Environment for Creativity
Environment for Learning through Play
Outdoor Play
Environment for Self-Control
Schedules for Preschoolers
149(4)
The Kindergarten Dilemma
153(3)
Things Not Seen in a Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environment for Preschoolers
156(5)
Developmentally Appropriate Physical Environments: For Primary-Aged Children
161(26)
What Are Primary-Aged Children Like?
162(3)
What Do Primary-Aged Children Do?
What Do Primary-Aged Children Need?
165(1)
Differences in Physical Environments for Primary-Aged Children
166(12)
Environment for a Sense of Industry
Environment for Literacy
Environment for Relationships
Schedule
178(1)
What about Recess?
179(2)
After-School Childcare
181(2)
Things Not Found in Developmentally Appropriate Primary Classrooms
183(4)
SECTION THREE Developmentally Appropriate Social Emotional Environments
187(100)
Guest Editorial
186(2)
Caroline Pratt
Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Environments: For Infants
188(17)
Social/Emotional Issues in Infancy
189(4)
Developmentally Appropriate Interaction Practices
193(12)
Respect
Sensitivity of Responsiveness
Close Physical Contact
Repetition and Consistency
Recognition of Limitations
Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Environments: For Toddlers
205(22)
Social/Emotional Issues of Toddlerhood
206(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Interaction with Toddlers
209(18)
Fostering Autonomy
Fostering Emotional Development
Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Environments: For Preschoolers
227(35)
Social/Emotional Issues of the Preschool Years
228(2)
Prosocial Behavior versus Aggression
230(1)
Helping Preschoolers with Emotional Control
231(8)
Nurturing Individual Identity
239(14)
Guidance Toward Self-Control
253(9)
Developmentally Appropriate Social/Emotional Environments: For Primary-Aged Children
262(25)
Social/Emotional Issues for the Primary Years
263(2)
Implications for Teachers Planning Social/Emotional Environments
265(12)
Helping Primary-Aged Children with Moral Development
277(2)
Helping Primary-Aged Children with Emotional Growth
279(8)
SECTION FOUR Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments
287(110)
Guest Editorial
286(2)
John Holt
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments: For Infants
288(22)
Understanding Sensorimotor Intelligence
290(20)
Language Development
Principles for Cognitive Development
Materials Appropriate at Various Stages
Appropriate Adult Roles to Nurture Cognitive Growth
Nurturing Language Development
Unsupportive Cognitive/Language Environments
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments: For Toddlers
310(21)
Understanding Toddler Cognitive Development
311(2)
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive Environments
313(4)
Burton White on Toddler Education
Principles of Teaching Toddlers
Planning
317(10)
Unsupportive Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments
327(4)
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments: For Preschoolers
331(32)
Preoperational Thinking
332(2)
Teachers' Roles in Providing for Play
334(14)
Language/Literacy Environments
348(15)
Early Literacy
Group Time
Unsupportive Language/Literacy Environments
Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language/Literacy Environments: For Primary-Aged Children
363(34)
Preoperational and Concrete Operational Thinking and Developmentally Appropriate Practice
365(32)
Other Aspects of Readiness for School Learning Tasks
Cognitive/Language/Literacy Goals of Primary Education
Components of Developmentally Appropriate Cognitive/Language Environments
Assessment versus Standardized Testing
SECTION FIVE Steps Toward More Developmentally Appropriate Practice
397(58)
Guest Editorial
396(2)
Howard Gardner
Helping Teachers Change to More Appropriate Practice
398(14)
Change Is Difficult
399(13)
A Plan for Change
Helping Families and Communities Understand Developmentally Appropriate Practice
412(17)
Reciprocal Relationships with Families
413(3)
Facilitating Understanding of Developmentally Appropriate Practice
416(3)
Key Issues
419(2)
Principles for Enlisting Support
421(2)
Strategies to Resolve Issues with Parents and the Community
423(6)
A Consideration of Various Curriculum Models
429(26)
The Montessori Approach---History and Philosophy
430(3)
The Bank Street Approach---History and Philosophy
433(4)
The Reggio Emilia Approach---History and Philosophy
437(6)
High/Scope Approach---History and Philosophy of the Model
443(3)
The Creative Curriculum---History and Philosophy
446(9)
Glossary 455(6)
Index 461


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...