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Digging In : Literature for Developing Writers,9780130493880
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Digging In : Literature for Developing Writers

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130493880

ISBN10:
0130493880
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/16/2003
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $97.20

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Summary

This book was written with the belief that teaching developmental composition with literature offers exciting possibilities for both students and instructors. Featuring poetry and short stories in addition to essays, DIGGING IN will engage your students like no other text. An introductory chapter on reading literature and a glossary following the last chapter give students all the resources they need to be successful. Most of the readings are contemporary, and the topics cover a broad extent of human experience. The chapters-Family History. GrowingUp/Growing Old, Learning and Teaching, The Emotional Side, Work and Dreams, and Issues/Positions-offer instructors an opportunity to teach within a theme. For each of the over 60 selections, the author has included: A short biography of the author. A Before Reading prompt. This prompt will start students thinking about the topic of the piece before they encounter the author's treatment of that topic, engaging them more thoroughly in the work. To Understand questions. Some of these test a student's basic understanding of what has happened in the piece. Others require more critical thinking and ask students to ponder particular parts or aspects of the work. To Write questions. These ask for personal responses to the literature. Ideas for Writing. These writing prompts address the general theme of the chapter (though not one particular work) and are meant to offer opportunities for formal paper writing.

Table of Contents

(Note:Each chapter concludes with an Ideas for Writing list.)
Reading Literature: A Brief Introduction
Family History
Birthday Poem
A Photo of Immigrants, 1903
Picture Bride
Powder
My Father's Song
Father
Nikki-Rosa
Not Skin Deep—Heart Deep
Driving Lessons
Catfish in the Bathtub
Growing Up/Growing Old
My Oedipus Complex
A Song in the Front Yard
Eleven
Death of the Right Fielder
Rite of Passage
The Chase
Junk Mail
The Woman Who Makes Swell Doughnuts
Henry Manley, Living Alone, Keeps Time
Pricing
Learning and Teaching
You Go to School to Learn
Yuba City School
Books
The Sanctuary of School
Lynda Barry
Office Hour
The Struggle to Be an American Girl
Manners
Miss Hicks
Advice I Wish Someone Had Given Me
The Lesson
The Emotional Side
Marks,Linda Pastan
Homage to My Hips
Daddy Tucked the Blanket
Leslie in California
Oranges
Paper Pills
Winter Love
It's Over
Loyal
Two on Two
Work and Dreams
What Work Is
Work
The Witness
The Case Against Chores
The Circuit
Cannery Town in August
The Fisherwoman
$100 and Nothing!
The Men We Carry in Our Minds
To Work
Issues/Positions
Say Yes
Beginning
The Eye of the Beholder
The Immigrants
Mother Tongue
Videotape
The Swimming Pool
Richard Cory
Ethics
Traveling Through the Dark
Popular Mechanics
Glossary
Author and Title Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

Excerpts

To the Instructor If you are holding this book in your hands, you are at least considering the notion of teaching your developmental composition class with literary selections. I applaud you for this. For years I''ve been asking myself why we don''t assign literature to our students who are just beginning to develop their writing skills. So much accessible and enjoyable fiction, poetry, and nonfiction could be offered to our students, yet traditionally we have taught our classes with the same kinds of readings they have been exposed to over and over again--articles about current issues. I don''t intend to criticize that approach; one can certainly teach reading and writing skills successfully with that kind of text. However, I hope you agree that teaching developmental composition with literature offers exciting possibilities for both students and instructors. What You Will Find in this Book This book starts with an introduction to the three genres of literature I''ve included: poetry, short stories, and essays. (Certainly, drama is another important literary genre, but for space considerations, I have not included any plays.) This chapter gives students a brief introduction to reading literature with a focus on some essential questions they can ask of each genre. I offer the basic vocabulary for discussing literature but keep it deliberately simple and not focused on memorizing terms or concepts. More than anything, this chapter is aimed at helping students feel comfortable with literature. The main feature of this book is the literature itself. I''ve included poems, short stories, and essays. You will find that most of the selections are accessible for students who are still developing their reading skills. A range exists, of course. Pieces like Tim O''Brien''s "Beginning" might challenge students a bit, but I have taken care to choose selections that are generally comprehensible on a first read. Most of the readings are contemporary, by well-known and lesser-known writers, and the topics cover a broad extent of human experience. The chapters--Family History, Growing Up/Growing Old, Learning and Teaching, The Emotional Side, Work and Dreams, and Issues/Positions--offer instructors an opportunity to teach within a theme, although you will find that an individual selection in one chapter might easily have been placed in another. Each chapter starts with a brief introduction to its theme and a preview of the literary selections. Students can read this to get a general sense of what they can look forward to in the chapter. Each selection of literature is preceded by a short biography of the author as well as a Before Readingprompt. This prompt will start students thinking about the topic of the piece before they encounter the author''s treatment of that topic, engaging them more thoroughly in the work. Following each poem, story, or essay, students will find To Understandand To Writequestions. Some of the To Understandquestions test a student''s basic understanding of what has happened in the piece. Others require more critical thinking and ask students to ponder particular parts or aspects of the work. The To Writequestions ask for personal responses to the literature. These can be used in several ways. You can assign them as take-home journal assignments, or you might use them as quick-write prompts at the beginning of class. Either way, students will be more prepared for class discussion if they have done some writing in response to the literature. These prompts might also be used for formal writing assignments, depending on the goals you have for those assignments. In general, the language in both the To Understandand To Writequestions is not the language of literary analysis nor of literary criticism. Students should be able to read the work and answer the questions without being intimidated by terminology or theory. At the end of each chapter, you will find a list of Ideas for Writing.These writing prompts address the general theme of the chapter (though not one particular work) and are meant to offer opportunities for formal paper writing. You might have students choose one assignment (or you might choose one for them) after they have read all or some of the literary selections for that chapter. I''ve phrased these prompts so you can use them for paragraph or essay assignments, depending on the direction of your class. A glossary following the last chapter is a final feature of this book. Although the literature in this text is quite accessible, you may find it helpful to direct your students to the glossary for words that are not familiar to them. Overall, I hope this book provides both students and instructors an enjoyable classroom experience. -- Albert Garcia


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