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Digital Design,9780130621214
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Digital Design

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130621214

ISBN10:
0130621218
Format:
Hardcover w/CD
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $120.00
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Summary

For sophomore courses on digital design in an Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, or Computer Science department. & Digital Design, fourth edition is a modern update of the classic authoritative text on digital design.& This book teaches the basic concepts of digital design in a clear, accessible manner. The book presents the basic tools for the design of digital circuits and provides procedures suitable for a variety of digital applications.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Binary Systems
1(32)
Digital Systems
1(2)
Binary Numbers
3(2)
Number Base Conversions
5(2)
Octal and Hexadecimal Numbers
7(2)
Complements
9(4)
Signed Binary Numbers
13(3)
Binary Codes
16(8)
Binary Storage and Registers
24(3)
Binary Logic
27(6)
Boolean Algebra and Logic Gates
33(31)
Basic Definitions
33(1)
Axiomatic Definition of Boolean Algebra
34(3)
Basic Theorems and Properties of Boolean Algebra
37(3)
Boolean Functions
40(4)
Canonical and Standard Forms
44(7)
Other Logic Operations
51(3)
Digital Logic Gates
54(5)
Integrated Circuits
59(5)
Gate-Level Minimization
64(47)
The Map Method
64(6)
Four-Variable Map
70(4)
Five-Variable Map
74(2)
Product of Sums Simplification
76(4)
Don't-Care Conditions
80(2)
NAND and NOR Implementation
82(7)
Other Two-Level Implementations
89(5)
Exclusive-OR Function
94(5)
Hardware Description Language (HDL)
99(12)
Combinational Logic
111(56)
Combinational Circuits
111(1)
Analysis Procedure
112(3)
Design Procedure
115(4)
Binary Adder-Subtractor
119(10)
Decimal Adder
129(2)
Binary Multiplier
131(2)
Magnitude Comparator
133(1)
Decoders
134(5)
Encoders
139(2)
Multiplexers
141(6)
HDL For Combinational Circuits
147(20)
Synchronous Sequential Logic
167(50)
Sequential Circuits
167(2)
Latches
169(3)
Flip-Flops
172(8)
Analysis of Clocked Sequential Circuits
180(10)
HDL For Sequential Circuits
190(8)
State Reduction and Assignment
198(5)
Design Procedure
203(14)
Registers and Counters
217(38)
Registers
217(2)
Shift Registers
219(8)
Ripple Counters
227(5)
Synchronous Counters
232(7)
Other Counters
239(5)
HDL for Registers and Counters
244(11)
Memory and Programmable Logic
255(36)
Introduction
255(1)
Random-Access Memory
256(6)
Memory Decoding
262(5)
Error Detection and Correction
267(3)
Read-Only Memory
270(6)
Programmable Logic Array
276(4)
Programmable Array Logic
280(3)
Sequential Programmable Devices
283(8)
Register Transfer Level
291(51)
Register Transfer Level (RTL) Notation
291(2)
Register Transfer Level in HDL
293(6)
Algorithmic State Machines (ASM)
299(5)
Design Example
304(6)
HDL Description of Design Example
310(7)
Binary Multiplier
317(4)
Control Logic
321(5)
HDL Description of Binary Multiplier
326(3)
Design With Multiplexers
329(13)
Asynchronous Sequential Logic
342(56)
Introduction
342(2)
Analysis Procedure
344(8)
Circuits With Latches
352(8)
Design Procedure
360(7)
Reduction of State and Flow Tables
367(7)
Race-Free State Assignment
374(5)
Hazards
379(5)
Design Example
384(14)
Digital Integrated Circuits
398(39)
Introduction
398(2)
Special Characteristics
400(4)
Bipolar-Transistor Characteristics
404(4)
RTL and DTL Circuits
408(2)
Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL)
410(10)
Emitter-Coupled Logic (ECL)
420(1)
Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS)
421(2)
Complementary MOS (CMOS)
423(4)
CMOS Transmission Gate Circuits
427(3)
Switch-Lever Modeling With HDL
430(7)
Laboratory Experiments
437(45)
Introduction to Experiments
437(5)
Binary and Decimal Numbers
442(3)
Digital Logic Gates
445(1)
Simplification of Boolean Functions
446(2)
Combinational Circuits
448(2)
Code Converters
450(2)
Design with Multiplexers
452(1)
Adders and Subtractors
453(3)
Flip-flops
456(2)
Sequential Circuits
458(2)
Counters
460(1)
Shift Registers
461(4)
Serial Addition
465(1)
Memory Unit
465(2)
Lamp Handball
467(4)
Clock-Pulse Generator
471(2)
Parallel Adder and Accumulator
473(2)
Binary Multiplier
475(3)
Asynchronous Sequential Circuits
478(1)
Verilog HDL Simulation Experiments
478(4)
Standard Graphic Symbols
482(19)
Rectangular-Shape Symbols
482(3)
Qualifying Symbols
485(2)
Dependency Notation
487(2)
Symbols For Combinational Elements
489(2)
Symbols For Flip-Flops
491(2)
Symbols For Registers
493(3)
Symbols For Counters
496(2)
Symbol For RAM
498(3)
Answers to Selected Problems 501(10)
Index 511

Excerpts

Digital design is concerned with the design of digital electronic circuits. Digital circuits are employed in the design and construction of systems such as digital computers, data communication, digital recording, and many other applications that require digital hardware. This book presents the basic tools for the design of digital circuits and provides the fundamental concepts used in the design of digital systems. It is suitable for use as a textbook in an introductory course in an electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science curriculum. Many of the features in this third edition remain the same as those of the previous editions except for rearrangement of the material or changes in emphasis due to changes in the technology. Combinational circuits are covered in one chapter instead of two, as in the previous edition. The sequential circuit chapter emphasizes design withDflip-flops instead ofJKandSRflip-flops. The material on memory and programmable logic are combined in one chapter. Chapter 8 has been revised to include register transfer level (RTL) design procedures. The main revision in the third edition is the inclusion of sections on Verilog Hardware Description Language (HDL). The HDL material is inserted in separate sections so it can be covered or skipped as desired. The presentation is at a suitable level for beginning students that are learning digital circuits and a hardware description language at the same time. Digital circuits are introduced in Chapters 1 through 3 with an introduction to Verilog HDL in Section 3-9. Further discussion of HDL occurs in Section 4-11 following the study of combinational circuits. Sequential circuits are covered in Chapters 5 and 6 with corresponding HDL examples in Sections 5-5 and 6-6. The HDL description of memory is presented in Section 7-2. The RTL symbols used in Verilog HDL are introduced in Sections 8-2. Examples of HDL descriptions in the RTL and structural levels are provided in Section# 8-5 and 8-8. Section 10-10 covers switch-level modeling corresponding to CMOS circuits. Section 11-19 supplements the hardware experiments of Chapter 11 with HDL experiments. Now the circuits designed in the laboratory can be checked by means of hardware components and/or by HDL simulation. The CD-ROM in the back of the book contains the Verilog HDL source code files for the examples in the book and two simulators provided by SynaptiCAD. The first simulator is VeriLogger Pro, a traditional Verilog simulator that can be used to simulate the HDL examples in the book and to verify the solutions of HDL problems. The second is a new type of simulation technology, called an Interactive Simulator. This simulator allows engineers to simulate and analyze design ideas before a complete simulation model or schematic is available. This technology is particularly useful for students, because they can quickly enter Boolean and D flip-flop or latch input equations to check equivalency or to experiment with flip-flops and latch designs. Tutorials are available as HTML files in the CD-ROM Flash display and as MS Word files in the SynaptiCAD installed directory under Book Tutorials. Additional resources are available in a companion Website at http://www.prenhall.com/mano . It includes all the Verilog HDL examples from the book for downloading, all of the figures and tables in the book in PDF format, tutorials on the use of the Verilog software in the CD-ROM, and more. The following is a brief description of the topics that are covered in each chapter with emphasis on the revisions that were made for the third edition. Chapter 1presents the various binary systems suitable for representing information in digital systems. The binary number system is explained and binary codes are illustrated. Examples are


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