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Discovering Arguments : An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Writing with Readings,9780131895676
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Discovering Arguments : An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Writing with Readings

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780131895676

ISBN10:
0131895672
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Summary

This book uses logos, pathos, and ethos in critical thinking, active reading, and persuasive writing. Accessible and stimulating, the versatile manual can be used as a rhetoric, a reader, a guide on research writing, and a guide on style. Through its chapters, users learn to excel at what they say; through our style interchapters users earn to excel at how they say it.Cheating, conservation, race, politics, male/female communication styles, gun control, abortion, same-sex marriage, stem cell research many diverse and mature readings on these subjects engage readers and writers in analytical thinking and stimulate them to react with thoughtful discussions and compositions.For individuals who want to communicate clearly, argue persuasively, and analyze and evaluate what they read.

Table of Contents

Preface xxv
Communication and Persuasion: Logos, Pathos, Ethos
1(42)
Noticing and Thinking
1(3)
The process of thinking
2(1)
The paradigm shift
3(1)
Communicating Clearly and Effectively
4(6)
Amy Wu, Stop the Clock
5(2)
Specific evidence
7(1)
Brian A. Courtney, Freedom from Choice
8(2)
Writing an Opinion Essay
10(2)
Finding your subject
11(1)
Writing Persuasively
12(1)
The Persuasive Appeals
13(15)
Logos
13(3)
Recognizing Logos
16(1)
S. I. Hayakawa, On Human Survival
16(2)
Pathos
18(3)
Recognizing Pathos
21(1)
Bob Greene, His Name Was Eric; He Wouldn't Steal, So His Life Was Stolen
22(1)
Ethos
23(1)
Recognizing Ethos
24(1)
John Edwards, A Trust Worth Winning
25(3)
Thesis Statements
28(2)
Evaluating your thesis statement
28(2)
Engaging Your Audience: Titles, Introductions, Conclusions
30(12)
Features of good titles
30(1)
Titles to avoid
31(1)
Features of good introductions
31(1)
Introductory strategies
31(2)
Introductions to avoid
33(1)
Features of good conclusions
33(1)
Concluding strategies
33(3)
Conclusions to avoid
36(1)
How to Annotate
37(1)
Ryan Grady Sample, Bigger, But Not Better
38(3)
A note on defining grammar, mechanics, and usage
41(1)
A Critical Thinker's Guide for Evaluating Writing
42(1)
Style and Voice
43(24)
Diction
43(5)
Monosyllabic words
43(3)
Multisyllabic words
46(1)
Pretentious Writing
47(1)
Other Features of Diction
48(6)
Specific or general
49(1)
Concrete or abstract
50(1)
Literal or figurative
51(1)
Literal Language
51(1)
Figurative Language
51(1)
Avoid cliches
52(1)
Precise words
52(2)
Language and Thought
54(2)
Voice
56(3)
Medicine Attacks Cold Virus
58(1)
The writing situation and voice
58(1)
Tone
59(2)
Analyzing attitude toward readers
59(1)
Analyzing attitudes toward subject and self
60(1)
Sentence Tools
61(4)
Simple sentences
61(1)
Joining complete thoughts: coordination
62(1)
Using Semicolons to Join Complete Thoughts
63(1)
Using Semicolons with Formal Transition Words
64(1)
Solving Two Common Sentence Problems
65(2)
Comma splices and run-on sentences
65(1)
Comma Splices
65(1)
Run-on Sentences
66(1)
Arguments and Controversies
67(65)
Critical Reading and Writing: Agree, Disagree, or Maybe Both?
67(4)
Deborah Tannen, How to Turn Debate into Dialogue
68(3)
Reading Tools
71(2)
Asking questions
71(1)
Noticing insights
72(1)
Noticing assumptions
72(1)
Noticing overgeneralizations
72(1)
Analyzing and Evaluating Two Essays on a Controversy
73(12)
Analysis and evaluation of Mitch Albom's essay
73(1)
Mitch Albom, Don't Shoot Holes in Gun Control Bills
74(2)
Albom's Writing Situation
76(1)
Albom's Introduction
76(1)
Noticing Albom's Insights, Assumptions, and Overgeneralizations
76(1)
Responding to Other Arguments
77(1)
Albom's Use of Logos, Pathos, and Ethos
78(1)
What Is the Solution?
78(1)
Albom's Conclusion
79(1)
Analysis and evaluation of Thomas Sowell's essay
79(1)
Thomas Sowell, Mass Shootings and Mass Hysteria
79(1)
Two Methods for Analyzing an Essay: Outlining and Summarizing
80(1)
Summary of Sowell's essay
81(2)
Sowell's Writing Situation
83(1)
Sowell's Introduction
83(1)
Noticing Sowell's Insights, Assumptions, and Overgeneralizations
83(1)
Responding to Other Arguments
84(1)
Sowell's Use of Logos, Pathos, and Ethos
84(1)
What Is the Solution?
84(1)
Sowell's Conclusion
84(1)
Albom and Sowell: What do you conclude?
85(1)
Kinds of Evidence for Arguing: Examples, Reasons, Authorities, Statistics
85(6)
Using examples
85(1)
Using reasons
86(1)
Using authorities
87(1)
Using statistics
88(3)
Writing an Essay about a Local Issue
91(1)
Writing a Report to Analyze and Evaluate an Argument
91(1)
Five Essays on Controversial Issues for a Report
92(9)
National service
92(1)
David S. Broder, A Call for Service
92(2)
Women in combat
94(1)
Linda Chavez, Women in Combat Will Take Toll on Our Culture
94(1)
College or pro sports
95(1)
David Shields, Why Not Go Pro?
95(2)
Donating organs
97(1)
Maureen Dowd, A Lyrical Gift
97(1)
Stem cell research
98(1)
Michael Kinsley, Cure Me If You Can
98(3)
Writing an Essay with Sources about a Controversy
101(4)
Organizing an essay about a controversy
102(1)
Present the Other Side First
102(1)
Rogerian Argument
103(1)
Ending Your Essay
104(1)
Readings on Controversial Issues: Three Case Studies
105(7)
Cheating for success
105(1)
Michael Josephson and Melissa Mertz, From Honor Above All
106(1)
ABCNEWS, Cheaters Amok, A Crisis in America's Schools--How It's Done and Why It's Happening
107(2)
ABCNEWS, Full-Service Fakery Inside the Life of a Professional Essay Writer and Test Taker
109(2)
Joe Smith, Mark Pogge, Jane Doe, Student Comments on the Ethics of Cheating
111(1)
Same-Sex Marriage
112(20)
Rochelle Hollander Schwab, I Want to Go to My Daughter's Wedding
112(2)
Andrew Sullivan, Integration Day
114(1)
Charles Krauthammer, When John and Jim Say, ``I Do''
115(2)
President George W. Bush, President Calls for Constitutional Amendment Protecting Marriage
117(1)
Meg A. Riley, What Shall I Tell My Daughter? An Open Letter to President Bush
118(2)
Maggie Gallagher, The Message of Same-Sex Marriage
120(1)
Affirmative action
121(1)
Interview by Peter Robinson, Shelby Steele: The Content of His Character
121(4)
National Organization for Women (NOW), Talking about Affirmative Action
125(2)
Wesley Clark, Success of Military Diversity Proves Affirmative Action Works
127(1)
Linda Chavez, Affirmative Action Doctors Can Kill You
128(2)
Perry Bacon Jr., How Much Diversity Do You Want From Me?
130(2)
Voice and Emphasis
132(14)
Diction and Repetition
132(3)
Repeating words for emphasis
132(1)
Alliteration
133(2)
Sentence Tools
135(7)
Joining complete and incomplete thoughts: subordination
135(2)
Colons and dashes and voice
137(1)
Colons
137(2)
Dashes
139(1)
Using Double Dashes
140(1)
Italics (underlining) and voice
141(1)
Parentheses and voice
142(1)
Fine-tuning Sentences
142(4)
Sentence fragments: pros and cons
142(1)
Conciseness
143(1)
Omit needless words I
144(1)
Omit needless words II
145(1)
Strategies of Argumentation
146(64)
Arguing by Induction and Deduction
147(3)
Induction
147(1)
Deduction
148(2)
Arguing by Illustration
150(1)
Arguing by Narration and Description
151(3)
Narration
151(1)
Description
152(2)
Arguing by Refutation
154(1)
Arguing from Comparison
155(2)
Organizing comparison: block and alternate patterns
156(1)
Arguing from Contraries
157(8)
Using contradictions and paradoxes
159(1)
Contradictions
159(2)
Paradoxes
161(1)
Kelly Betzold, Quiet's Noise
162(1)
Paradox and Tolerance for Ambiguity
163(1)
Either/or Thinking
164(1)
Arguing from Analogy
165(5)
Explaining the mind
168(2)
Arguing from Classification
170(2)
Arguing from Cause and Effect
172(3)
Arguing from Definition
175(6)
Digging for roots of words
179(2)
Analyzing and Evaluating an Essay
181(6)
John Gray, Wallets and Purses
181(1)
Stephen King, Why We Crave Horror Movies
182(2)
Susan Ager, Cool Comfort Steals Summer's Seasoning
184(1)
Langston Hughes, That Word Black
185(2)
Using the Toulmin Strategy to Argue
187(11)
Kinds of arguments--kinds of claims
188(1)
Laws and Policies
188(1)
Reality, Facts
189(2)
Values, Morals, Taste
191(1)
Warrants
192(1)
Stating the Warrant
193(1)
Finding the Claim
194(4)
Toulmin and the Psychology of Argument
198(2)
Uncovering hidden values, beliefs, and attitudes
199(1)
Using the Toulmin Strategy to Analyze and Evaluate an Argument
200(5)
Thomas Sowell, Human Parasites Are Infesting Society
200(2)
Analyzing and evaluating Sowell's argument
202(1)
Sowell's Claim
203(1)
The Grounds
203(1)
Sowell's Warrant
204(1)
Essays to Analyze and Evaluate with the Toulmin Strategy
205(5)
Brent Staples, What Adolescents Miss When We Let Them Grow Up in Cyberspace
205(2)
Mitch Albom, A Serious Look at Wacky Weed and Suffering
207(1)
Ellen Goodman, Linking Crime, Abortion Rates Makes Everyone Queasy
208(2)
Strategies of Repetition
210(13)
Sentence Tools
210(4)
Parallelism
210(2)
Anaphora
212(2)
Epistrophe
214(1)
The Power of Threes in Sentences
214(9)
Susan Ager, Baby, Baby, Baby, 3 Has Its Charms
215(1)
Using threes in sentences: rising order or not
216(1)
Varying sentence beginnings: three ways
217(1)
Using -ing Phrases
217(2)
Misusing -ing Phrases: Dangling Modifiers
219(1)
Using -ed or -en Phrases
220(1)
Using To Phrases
221(2)
Problems in Reasoning
223(36)
Finding the Facts
223(1)
Implications, Assumptions, and Inferences
224(7)
Implications
225(1)
Assumptions
225(2)
Inferences
227(4)
Fallacies
231(1)
Problems of Insufficient Evidence
232(6)
Overgeneralizing
233(2)
Card stacking
235(1)
Ad ignorantium
236(1)
Post hoc ergo propter hoc
236(2)
Problems Based on Irrelevant Information
238(9)
Ad baculum
239(1)
Ad hominem
239(1)
Fallacy of opposition
240(1)
Genetic fallacy
240(1)
Guilt by association
240(1)
Ad misericordiam
240(1)
Ad populum
241(1)
Bandwagon
242(1)
Plain folks and snob appeal
242(1)
Ad verecundiam
243(1)
Red herring
243(1)
Weak opponent
243(1)
Tu quoque
244(1)
Oversimplification
245(2)
Problems of Ambiguity
247(4)
Amphibole
247(1)
Begging the question
247(1)
Equivocation
248(1)
Loaded language
248(1)
False analogy
249(2)
Problems of Faulty Reasoning
251(5)
False dilemma (either/or thinking)
251(1)
Non sequitur
252(1)
Rationalization
252(1)
Reductio ad absurdum
252(1)
Slippery slope
253(3)
Reading and Writing Activities
256(3)
David Rothenberg, How the Web Destroys the Quality of Students' Research Papers
256(3)
Style and Contraries
259(10)
Sentence Tools
259(5)
Antithesis
259(2)
Antithesis and balanced sentences
261(1)
Loose and periodic sentences
262(2)
Fine-tuning Sentences
264(5)
False starts
264(1)
Active and passive verbs
265(4)
Visual Arguments
269(50)
Photographs
269(11)
News photographs
269(4)
Staged Images
273(2)
Documentary photographs
275(2)
Fotolog: a new photo phenomenon
277(1)
Student essays analyzing and evaluating photographs
277(2)
Like a photograph, a painting
279(1)
Advertisements
280(10)
Commercial ads
280(3)
Ads for social causes
283(5)
Student essays analyzing and evaluating advertisements
288(2)
Cartoons
290(13)
Cartoons and creativity
292(1)
Creativity and Humor
293(2)
Serious cartoons
295(1)
Editorial cartoons
296(4)
Student essays analyzing and evaluating cartoons
300(3)
Film
303(16)
Andrew Sullivan, Blinded by the Light, Is Michael Moore Actually Mel Gibson's Alter Ego?
303(1)
Writing about a film
304(4)
Finding and synthesizing sources
308(2)
Student film reviews
310(9)
Analyzing and Evaluating Style
319(17)
Tools of Style
319(2)
Analyzing and Evaluating the Style of a Passage
321(3)
Analyzing and Evaluating the Style of an Essay or a Speech
324(5)
Rick Reilly, The Swooshification of the World
325(4)
Essays for Analysis and Evaluation
329(7)
Leonard Pitts, Jr., September 12, 2001: We'll Go Forward from This Moment
329(2)
Anna Quindlen, Whoever We Are, Loss Finds Us and Defines Us
331(1)
Martin Luther King, Jr., I Have a Dream
332(4)
Critical Thinking About Poetry, Fiction, and Literary Nonfiction
336(53)
Reading and Writing about Poetry
336(9)
The language of poetry
339(2)
Elements of poetry
341(1)
Diction
341(1)
Imagery
342(1)
Figures of Speech: Metaphors, Similes, and Symbols
342(1)
Tone
343(1)
Speaker
343(1)
Sound Patterns
343(1)
Structure
344(1)
Line Breaks
344(1)
Reading Notebook
345(2)
Writing an Essay about a Poem
347(5)
Student essay analyzing and evaluating a poem
349(3)
Poems to Consider for Writing an Essay
352(9)
Reading and Writing about Fiction
361(5)
Stuart Dybek, Lights
362(1)
Stuart Dybek, Maroon
363(1)
Anne Caston, Flying Out with the Wounded
364(1)
Elements of fiction
365(1)
Plot and Conflict
365(1)
Character
365(1)
Point of View
366(1)
Setting
366(1)
Moral Issues
366(1)
Writing an Essay about a Story
366(2)
Stories to Consider for Writing an Essay
368(7)
Kate Chopin, The Story of an Hour
368(2)
Ernest Hemingway, The End of Something
370(2)
Stuart Dybek, Pet Milk
372(3)
Reading and Writing about Literary Nonfiction
375(6)
Richard Selzer, Brute
376(5)
Writing about a Literary Nonfiction Essay
381(8)
Richard Selzer, Abortion
381(4)
Richard Selzer, Toenails
385(4)
Library Strategies
389(28)
Research Writing Options
389(1)
The informational report
389(1)
The argument paper
390(1)
Modern Research
390(1)
Start in the Library
391(2)
Preliminary reading
392(1)
Locating Your Research Question
393(1)
Strategy One: Finding Background Material
393(4)
The general encyclopedias
393(1)
Always Use the Indexes
393(1)
Specialized encyclopedias
394(1)
The Growth Phenomenon: A Research Problem
395(1)
Critical thinking in a research notebook
395(1)
Notes and Note Cards
396(1)
Strategy Two: Looking for Books
397(4)
Bibliographies
398(1)
Online databases and bookstores
398(1)
The Library of Congress online
398(1)
The Library of Congress main catalog
399(1)
Other online sources
399(1)
The public access catalog
400(1)
Strategy Three: Look for Articles
401(4)
Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature
401(1)
Newspaper Online Archives
402(1)
FirstSearch and ProQuest
402(1)
To use popular sources or not
403(1)
Divide your work into steps or phases
403(1)
Start Where You Are
403(1)
Professional, technical, and specialty journals
404(1)
Strategy Four: Look for Reports, Other Specialized Information
405(3)
Government documents, reports
405(1)
Statistical information
405(1)
Biographical sources
406(1)
Book reviews
407(1)
Strategy Five: Use Electronic Sources and Microform Readers
408(1)
Microform readers
409(1)
The Working Bibliography
409(1)
Writing a Research Proposal
410(7)
Giving the background research
410(1)
Example background
411(1)
Describing your project
412(1)
Example description
412(1)
Explaining your methods and procedures
412(1)
Example methods and procedures
413(1)
Anticipating problems and requirements in your project
413(1)
Example problems or requirements
414(1)
Discussing the significance of your project
414(1)
Example significance
414(1)
Listing your works cited or references
415(1)
Example works cited for your proposal (MLA style)
415(1)
Example references for your proposal (APA style)
415(2)
Evaluating Evidence
417(35)
Research and the Internet
417(1)
Evaluation and the Internet
417(1)
Millions of hits
418(1)
Print out Internet material
418(1)
What Is a Reliable Site?
418(1)
Evaluating Web sites
418(1)
Criteria for Web Sites
419(3)
Who Is the Author?
422(4)
Identifying authors
423(1)
Caution on the Internet
424(1)
Authority
425(1)
The establishment bias: An exception
425(1)
Reliable Information: On the Net and Off
426(3)
Context
426(1)
Timely data
427(1)
Documentation and credibility
427(1)
Hoaxes, jokes, conspiracies, and frauds
428(1)
Understanding Evidence
429(11)
Active reading
429(1)
An Active Reading Technique
429(1)
Harry Schwartz, Cloning Dolly May Be Biggest News of Our Lives
430(2)
Questioning evidence
432(1)
Primary and secondary evidence
433(1)
A Problem-Solving Approach to Research
434(1)
The weight of evidence
434(1)
Magazines and journals
435(1)
What Are Professional Journals?
435(1)
Researchers' Rule
436(1)
Examining Testimony
436(1)
Reliable Testimony
437(1)
Statements of Fact
437(1)
Inferences
438(1)
``Mere'' Opinions Versus Critical Judgments
438(1)
Considering the evidence itself
438(1)
A Priori Reasoning
438(1)
Prima Facie Reasoning
439(1)
De Facto Reasoning
439(1)
Ex Post Facto Reasoning
439(1)
Defining your terms
440(1)
Occam's Razor: The Rule of Simplicity
440(6)
Remaining impartial
441(1)
Remaining objective
441(1)
Determining relevance
442(1)
Significance
442(1)
Claim
443(1)
Persuasion
443(1)
Judging probability
443(1)
Evaluating statistical data
443(1)
Problems of questionnaires
444(2)
Evaluating the Data: A Test Case
446(6)
Summing up the evidence
449(1)
Charles Krauthammer, Why Lines Must Be Drawn
450(2)
Documentation
452(39)
How Much Documentation?
453(1)
Research Problems to Avoid
453(3)
The string of pearls
453(1)
Underresearched paper
454(1)
Overworking the data
454(1)
Underdocumentation
454(1)
Plagiarism
454(1)
The Original Material
454(1)
Correct Use of Borrowed Information in a Research Paper
455(1)
Plagiarism, Accidental (Maybe)
455(1)
Plagiarism, Deliberate
455(1)
Plagiarism, Deliberate
456(1)
Summarizing and Paraphrasing
456(1)
Parenthetical References
457(1)
What to Document
458(3)
Direct quotations
458(1)
Words and ideas from a source
458(1)
Paraphrases and restatements
458(2)
Discussing the same source
460(1)
Source within a source
460(1)
Content notes
461(1)
What Not to Document
461(2)
Common knowledge
461(2)
In-Text Rules: MLA Style
463(3)
Use author's name and signal phrase
463(1)
Works Cited Entry for Two or Three Authors
464(1)
Works Cited Entry for Four or More Authors
464(1)
Name and Date Style in Your Paper, More than Two Authors
464(1)
Name and Date Style in Your References, Give All Authors' Names, in Reverse Order
464(1)
Use name and title for more than one work by same author
464(1)
Use shortened titles
465(1)
Use page numbers
465(1)
Works with Numbered Sections or Lines
466(1)
Bibliography
466(2)
Authors' names
466(1)
Titles
467(1)
Place of publication
467(1)
Shorten publishers' names
467(1)
Copyright date
467(1)
Basic Works Cited Model, Book (MLA)
468(1)
Basic Works Cited Model, Periodical (MLA)
468(1)
Books: MLA Works Cited Models
469(2)
One author
469(1)
More than one book by same author
469(1)
Author of one book, coauthor of another
469(1)
Two or more authors
469(1)
Committee or group author
470(1)
Book with editor(s)
470(1)
Essay, chapter, or selection in anthology, edited work
470(1)
Translation
470(1)
Multivolume work
470(1)
Part(s) of multivolume work
470(1)
Reprint of older work
470(1)
Edition
471(1)
Introduction, preface, foreword
471(1)
Bible, sacred works
471(1)
Anonymous works
471(1)
Dictionary
471(1)
Periodicals: MLA Works Cited Models
471(3)
Weekly magazine article
471(1)
Magazine article, no author given
472(1)
Monthly magazine article
472(1)
Newspaper article
472(1)
Newspaper article, unsigned
472(1)
Editorial, signed and unsigned
472(1)
Letter to the editor
472(1)
Book review
473(1)
Film review
473(1)
Music review
473(1)
Professional, technical, or specialty journal, each issue starting with page 1
473(1)
Professional, technical, or specialty journal, pages numbered continuously throughout year
473(1)
Titles and quotes within titles
474(1)
Other Sources: MLA Works Cited Models
474(2)
Handout or unpublished essay
474(1)
Lecture, speech, public address
474(1)
Film
474(1)
Video recording: television or film
474(1)
Play, performance
475(1)
Musical performance
475(1)
Musical composition
475(1)
Recording
475(1)
Individual selection from a recording
475(1)
Television show
475(1)
Work of art
475(1)
Poem published separately
475(1)
Poem in a collection
475(1)
Letter, personal
475(1)
Letter(s), published
475(1)
Personal interview
476(1)
Telephone interview
476(1)
Published interview
476(1)
A chart, diagram, map, or table
476(1)
A cartoon
476(1)
An advertisement
476(1)
Electronic Sources: MLA Works Cited Models
476(3)
Article from a magazine
477(1)
Article from an online newspaper
477(1)
Article from an online professional or technical journal
477(1)
Online book
478(1)
Part of an online book
478(1)
Online government publication
478(1)
CD-ROM
478(1)
Work from an online database
478(1)
Name and Date Method of Documentation: APA Style
479(1)
Guidelines for References in Your Text: APA Style
480(1)
Extended discussion
480(1)
Two or more authors
480(1)
No author
481(1)
Author (committee or group) with long name
481(1)
Two authors with same name
481(1)
Same author, same year
481(1)
In References List
481(1)
Multiple references
481(1)
References List in APA Style
481(1)
Basic Reference Form, Book (APA)
482(1)
Basic Reference Form, Periodicals (APA)
482(1)
Books: Reference List Models, APA Style
483(3)
One author
483(1)
More than one book by same author
483(1)
Author of one book, coauthor of another
484(1)
Two or more authors
484(1)
Committee or group author
484(1)
Book with editor(s)
484(1)
Chapter or section in an edited work
484(1)
Translation
485(1)
Multivolume work
485(1)
Part(s) of multivolume work
485(1)
Unsigned work
485(1)
Reprint of older work
485(1)
Edition
485(1)
Introduction, preface, foreword
485(1)
Dictionary
485(1)
Periodicals: Reference List Models, APA Style
486(1)
Weekly magazine article
486(1)
Magazine article, no author given
486(1)
Monthly magazine article
486(1)
Newspaper article
486(1)
Newspaper article, unsigned
486(1)
Editorial, signed and unsigned
486(1)
Letter to the editor
486(1)
Book review
486(1)
Film review
487(1)
Music review
487(1)
Professional, technical, or specialty journal, each issue starting with page 1
487(1)
Professional, technical, or specialty journal, pages numbered continuously throughout volume
487(1)
Titles and quotes within titles
487(1)
Other Sources: Reference List Models, APA Style
487(2)
Handout or unpublished essay
487(1)
Lecture, speech, public address
487(1)
Film
488(1)
Video or DVD: film or television
488(1)
Television show
488(1)
Play, performance
488(1)
Recording
488(1)
Individual selection from a recording
488(1)
Work of art
488(1)
Poem published separately
488(1)
Poem in a collection
488(1)
Letter, personal
488(1)
Letter(s), published
488(1)
Personal interview
488(1)
Published interview
489(1)
A chart, diagram, map, or table
489(1)
A cartoon
489(1)
An advertisement
489(1)
Electronic Sources: Reference List Models, APA Style
489(2)
Internet articles based on a print source
489(1)
Article from a professional or technical journal
489(1)
Article from an online journal, no print source
489(1)
Article from a magazine
489(1)
Article from an online newspaper
490(1)
Online book
490(1)
Online government publication
490(1)
Work from an online database
490(1)
Writing Your Research Paper
491(77)
Researchers as Writers
491(1)
Writing an Informational Report
491(5)
A model informational report
492(4)
Organizing Informational Reports
496(1)
Writing an Argument Paper
497(2)
Shaping your thesis
497(1)
The Arguable Proposition
497(1)
Discovering order
497(1)
Working through your project
498(1)
Understanding Audience
498(1)
Controlling Your Voice
498(1)
Taking Your Time
499(1)
Substantiating Your Data
499(1)
The Formal Outline
499(1)
Revising the preliminary outline
500(1)
The Formal Outline Model
500(2)
The Abstract
502(2)
Title, Introduction, Conclusion
504(1)
The title
504(1)
The introduction
504(1)
The conclusion
504(1)
Organizing Your Paper
505(1)
Chronological
505(1)
Order of importance
505(1)
Making concessions
505(1)
Writing Clear Paragraphs
506(1)
Use unifying devices
507(1)
Works Cited or References
507(1)
The bibliography rule
507(1)
A Model Argument Paper
508(9)
Typing Your Paper
517(3)
MLA guidelines
517(1)
APA guidelines
518(1)
Example title page based on APA guidelines
519(1)
APA page models after title page
519(1)
Illustrations and Tables
520(3)
CONCISE HANDBOOK ON GRAMMAR, MECHANICS, AND USAGE
Sentences
523(16)
Punctuation
539(14)
Mechanics
553(8)
Glossary of Usage
561(7)
Credits 568(6)
Index 574


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