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Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-In-Environment Assessment and Intervention,9780205298891
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Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-In-Environment Assessment and Intervention

by ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780205298891

ISBN10:
0205298893
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $88.80
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  • Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-in-Environment Assessment and Intervention
    Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-in-Environment Assessment and Intervention
  • Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-in-Environment Assessment and Intervention
    Diversity, Oppression, and Social Functioning : Person-in-Environment Assessment and Intervention




Summary

This diversity practice book teaches readers how to work with a broad range of diverse populations, using the "Person-In-Environment" (PIE) theoretical framework. The diverse populations presented in the book are described within an ecological, strengths perspective. The authors' thesis is that, in order to work effectively with diverse populations, it is necessary to take into consideration the complex dynamics of social functioning and social oppression. The "Person-In-Environment" theoretical framework provides a basis for analysis of the social, economic, and political reality of these diverse populations. The text presents an affirmative practice approach, and builds on the available diversity practice literature. For anyone working in a diverse population or looking to gain knowledge in this area.

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
James M. Karls
Preface xiii
Framework for Practice with Diverse and Oppressed Clients
1(15)
George A. Appleby
Theory for Practice
6(8)
Ecological Framework for Practice
7(2)
Diversity and Strengths Perspective
9(1)
Value Base for Practice
10(1)
Assessment and Intervention Framework
11(3)
Conclusion
14(1)
References
14(2)
Culture, Social Class, and Social Identity Development
16(20)
George A. Appleby
Culture
18(8)
Norms
19(1)
Values
20(2)
Language and Culture
22(1)
Cultural Change
23(3)
Subcultures
26(1)
Social Class
26(4)
Education and Social Class
29(1)
Social Identity Development
30(2)
Social Categorization
30(1)
Social Comparison
31(1)
Person-in-Environment Classification System
32(2)
Conclusion
34(1)
References
34(2)
Dynamics of Oppression and Discrimination
36(17)
George A. Appleby
Oppression and Power
37(5)
Sexual Oppression
39(2)
Racial Oppression
41(1)
Discrimination
42(1)
Diversity
42(2)
Identity
44(1)
Stigma and Stigma Management
45(5)
Effects of Stigmatization
47(3)
Conclusion
50(1)
References
51(2)
Racism: People of Color
53(17)
Julia Hamilton
Defining Racism and Race
54(1)
Race and Developmental Process
55(2)
Who Are People of Color?
57(1)
Theories of Racism
57(5)
Micro Level Theories of Racism
57(1)
Macro Level Theory of Racism
58(3)
Perceptions of Whites
61(1)
The Changing Meaning of Race
62(1)
The Hidden Injuries of Race
62(1)
Assessment
63(2)
Assessment Process for the Social Worker
65(1)
Case Study
65(3)
Referral Issues
66(1)
Assessment Issues
67(1)
PIE Assessment of David
68(1)
Conclusion
68(1)
References
69(1)
Women and Sexist Oppression
70(22)
Barbara Worden
Case Study
72(8)
The PIE Classification System for Problems in Social Functioning
73(1)
PIE Assessment of Jean
74(1)
The Empowerment Framework
75(1)
Male Models of Structured Reality
76(2)
Madness as a Feminist Construct
78(2)
Macro-Analysis: Feminist Epistemologies and the Nature of Knowledge Making
80(4)
What Do We Mean By the Oppression of Women?
83(1)
Women and Work
84(1)
Family Policy, Welfare, and Gender Roles
84(2)
Feminization of Poverty
86(2)
Conclusion
88(1)
Helpful Web Sites
88(1)
References
89(3)
A Multidiversity Perspective on Latinos: Issues of Oppression and Social Functioning
92(17)
Edgar Colon
Hispanic versus Latino Terms
93(1)
Sociodemographic Profile
94(3)
Racial and Ethnic Identity
94(1)
Poverty and Social Status
95(1)
Labor Force Participation
95(1)
Latino Immigration
95(2)
Latino Normative and Cultural Values
97(3)
Latino Racial and Class Identity
97(1)
Respect, Dignity, and Personalism
98(1)
Help Seeking Behaviors
98(1)
Latino Family
99(1)
Gender Roles
99(1)
Family Support System
100(1)
A PIE Perspective of Working with Issues of Oppression and Social Functioning
100(5)
Assessing for Social Functioning Problems
101(1)
Assessing for Mental Health Problems
102(1)
Assessing for Health Problems
102(3)
Case Study
105(1)
Factor I: Problems in Social Functioning
105(1)
Factor II: Problems in the Environment
105(1)
Conclusion
106(1)
References
107(2)
Native Americans: Oppression and Social Work Practice
109(22)
Jack Paul Gesino
History of Racism
110(2)
Present Day: Social and Health Problems
112(4)
Mental Health
114(1)
Family, Beliefs, and Rituals
115(1)
Values and Traditions
116(1)
Spiritual Traditions of Native Americans
116(1)
Practice Implications
117(6)
Intervention
121(2)
The PIE System and Native Americans
123(1)
Case Study
124(4)
PIE Assessment of Mary
124(4)
Conclusion
128(1)
References
128(3)
Asian Americans: Ethnocentrism and Discrimination
131(14)
Michie N. Hesselbrock
Cheryl Parks
Immigration and Resettlement Patterns and Consequences
133(4)
Chinese
133(1)
Japanese
134(1)
Filipinos
135(1)
Koreans and Asian Indians
136(1)
Southeast Asians
136(1)
Norms, Beliefs, and Cultural Stereotypes
137(3)
Common Beliefs
138(2)
Implications for Social Work Practice
140(2)
Case Study
142(1)
PIE Assessment of Mr. Yee
142(1)
Conclusion
143(1)
References
143(2)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People Confront Heterocentrism, Heterosexism, and Homophobia
145(34)
George A. Appleby
History
150(3)
Historical Oppression in Context
153(1)
Definitions
154(2)
The Roots of Oppression
156(12)
Gender Ideology
157(1)
Heterosexual Privilege
158(1)
Religion
158(2)
Psychiatry/Psychology
160(1)
Law and Policy
160(1)
AIDS and HIV Disease
161(2)
Popular Culture and Attitudes
163(3)
Violence and Gay Bashing
166(2)
Internalized Homophobia
168(1)
Case Study
169(4)
PIE Assessment of Jack
172(1)
Conclusion
173(1)
References
173(6)
Ableism: Social Work Practice with Individuals with Physical Disabilities
179(16)
P. Minou Michilin
Silvia Juarez-Marazzo
Historical Overview
182(1)
The Nature of Disability
183(6)
Functional Disability versus Socially Imposed Disability
184(1)
Early Age of Onset
185(3)
Later Age of Onset
188(1)
Person-in-Environment Assessment
189(1)
Case Study
190(3)
The Social Worker's Role
191(1)
PIE Assessment of Ms. S.
192(1)
Intervention
193(1)
Conclusion
193(1)
References
194(1)
Religious Bigotry and Religious Minorities
195(22)
Constance L. Mindell
Religious Minorities
196(5)
The Role of Religion
198(1)
Beliefs and Customs
199(2)
Person-in-Environment Assessment
201(6)
Historical Overview
207(7)
Religious Bigotry as Historic Context for Understanding Religion
207(7)
Conclusion
214(1)
References
215(2)
Ableism: Mentally and Emotionally Challenged People
217(22)
Jaak Rakfeldt
Theoretical Framework
218(10)
Mental Disorders as Social Roles
219(5)
Self-Concept
224(3)
Social Roles/Relationships and Psychiatric Disability
227(1)
Case Study
228(7)
PIE Assessment of Steve
234(1)
Theories of Practice: Person-in-Environment Analysis
235(1)
Conclusion
235(1)
References
236(3)
Affirmative Practice with People Who Are Culturally Diverse and Oppressed
239(18)
Edgar Colon
George A. Appleby
Julia Hamilton
A Paradigm for Affirmative Practice
240(1)
Culture and Diversity: A Transactional View
240(13)
The Power of Personal Experience
241(1)
Diversity and Worldviews
241(2)
Interrelatedness and Interconnectedness of Human Experience
243(1)
Interlocking Systems of Oppression
243(1)
Practice Implications: Women
244(1)
Practice Implications: Gays and Lesbians
245(2)
Practice Implications: Latinos
247(1)
Practice Implications: African Americans
248(1)
Practice Implications: Native Americans
248(1)
Practice Implications: The Chronically Mentally Ill and the Physically Challenged
249(1)
Micro Systems Intervention
249(2)
Mezzo Intervention
251(1)
Cultural Competence and the Profession
252(1)
Macro Intervention
253(1)
Conclusion
253(2)
References
255(2)
Appendix: PIE Assessment Forms for Factors I and II 257(6)
Contributors 263(2)
Index 265


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