The Divine Comedy I: Inferno

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  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 8/29/2006
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics

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The most famous of the three canticles that comprise The Divine Comedy, Infernodescribes Dante’s descent in Hell midway through his life with Virgil as a guide. As he descends through nine concentric circles of increasingly agonizing torture, Dante encounters doomed souls that include the pagan Aeneas, the liar Odysseus, the suicidal Cleopatra, and his own political enemies, damned for their deceit. Led by leering demons, Dante must ultimately journey with Virgil to the deepest level of all—for it is only by encountering Satan himself, in the heart of Hell, that he can truly understand the tragedy of sin. BACKCOVER: The perfect balance of tightness and colloquialism... likely to be the best modern version of Dante. —Bernard O’Donoghue This version is the first to bring together poetry and scholarship in the very body of the translation—a deeply informed version of Dante that is also a pleasure to read.” —Professor David Wallace, University of Pennsylvania

Author Biography

Dante Alighieri (1265-ű1321) wrote The Divine Comedy, it is believed, between 1308 and 1320.

Robin Kirkpatrick is a widely published Dante scholar. He is fellow of Robinson College and professor of Italian and English literature at Cambridge University.

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