9781571103765

Do I Really Have to Teach Reading? : Content Comprehension, Grades 6-12

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781571103765

  • ISBN10:

    1571103767

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2/1/2004
  • Publisher: Stenhouse Pub

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Summary

"Do I really have to teach reading?" This is the question many teachers of adolescents are asking, wondering how they can possibly add a new element to an already overloaded curriculum. And most are finding that the answer is "yes." If they want their students to learn complex new concepts in different disciplines, they often have to help their students become better readers.Building on the experiences gained in her own language arts classroom as well as those of colleagues in different disciplines, Cris Tovani, author ofI Read It, but I Don't Get It, takes on the challenge of helping students apply reading comprehension strategies in any subject. InDo I Really Have to Teach Reading?, Cris shows how teachers can expand on their content expertise to provide instruction students need to understand specific technical and narrative texts. The book includes: examples of how teachers can model their reading process for students; ideas for supplementing and enhancing the use of required textbooks; detailed descriptions of specific strategies taught in context; stories from different high school classrooms to show how reading instruction varies according to content; samples of student work, including both struggling readers and college-bound seniors; a variety of "comprehension constructors": guides designed to help students recognize and capture their thinking in writing while reading; guidance on assessing students; tips for balancing content and reading instruction. Cris's humor, honesty, and willingness to share her own struggles as a teacher make this a unique take on content reading instruction that will be valuable to reading teachers as well as content specialists.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vi
Introduction: ``I'm the Stupid Lady from Denver . . .''
1(10)
The ``So What?'' of Reading Comprehension
11(12)
Parallel Experiences: Tapping the Mother Lode
23(14)
Real Rigor: Connecting Students with Accessible Text
37(14)
``Why Am I Reading This?''
51(16)
Holding Thinking to Remember and Reuse
67(22)
Group Work That Grows Understanding
89(12)
``What Do I Do with All These Sticky Notes?'' Assessment That Drives Instruction
101(16)
``Did I Miss Anything? Did I Miss Everything?'' Last Thoughts
117(6)
Appendix
123(14)
Double-Entry Diary
Comprehension Constructor with Connections Guide
``The Three Bears'' Translation
Sample Text Set Guide Sheet
Instructional Purpose
My Answer Comprehension Constructor
Template for Reading Response Logs
Silent Reading Response Sheet
Weekly Calendar
Double-Strategy, Double-Entry Diary
Highlight and Revisit
Group Observation Form
Bibliography 137

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